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Executive Report on Results of Spring 2013 UMD Climate Surveys
Faculty and Staff Survey and Student Survey
August 2013

Background Information
For nearly three years, our campus community has been working to create an inclusive campus for all who learn and work at UMD.  The vision to have a positive and inclusive campus climate was established as Goal 2 of the UMD Strategic Plan in May 2011.  Action Step 5 of Goal 2 of this plan is to

Conduct a longitudinal survey and assessment of campus climate and diversity initiatives… disseminating results and integrating findings into academic and student life.

A Subcommittee of the Campus Change Team (CCT) developed, vetted, and piloted two climate surveys based on assessment instruments used by the campus in 2002, 2009, and 2010.  The CCT and the Leadership Team reviewed and approved the final surveys.  One of the surveys was sent to 1828 UMD faculty and staff members in January 2013.  The response rate was 19.4% (355 respondents).  The other was sent to 9809 UMD undergraduate students in March 2013. The response rate was 4.0% (393 respondents).

Recognizing the importance of assessing the campus climate using multiple approaches, two Student Focus Group studies (http://www.d.umn.edu/chancellor/climate/surveys.html) and a Campus Labs student survey have been completed since June 2011.  Finally, a protocol for the administration of surveys at UMD was developed in June 2012 (http://www.d.umn.edu/vcaa/institutionalresearch/Documents/Survey%20Protocols.pdf).

Spring 2013 UMD Climate Surveys
This table provides links to the

  • Faculty and Staff (1) survey, (2) analysis of quantitative results from all respondents, (3) analysis of results by gender, race/ethnicity, length of time employed at UMD, primary appointment, and tenure status, and (4) summary of written comments.
  • Student (1) survey, (2) analysis of quantitative results from all respondents, (3) analysis of results by gender, race/ethnicity, class standing, collegiate unit, and (4) summary of written comments.     

 

Note:  The items below are links.


Spring 2013 UMD Campus Climate Survey - Faculty and Staff

Spring 2013 UMD Campus Climate Survey - Student

Survey

Survey

Overall Analysis of all responses – Report Part A

Overall Analysis of all responses – Report Part A

Group Analysis (gender, race/ethnicity, length of employment, primary position, etc.) – Report Part B

Group Analysis (gender, race/ethnicity, class standing, etc.) – Report Part B

Summary of written comments

Summary of written comments

Recommendations Based on Spring 2013 UMD Climate Survey Results

 

Summary of Spring 2013 UMD Campus Climate Faculty Staff Survey Results
Response Rate:   The response rate (19.4%) was encouraging but efforts will be made to increase the participation percentage for the 2015.

Overall Analysis:   Based on the mean response values, faculty and staff respondents experience a satisfactory campus climate.  There is consensus that diversity is necessary to create a culture of academic excellence (Question 3) and that the current priority the campus places on diversity is appropriate (Question 17).  The Chancellor is viewed as an effective leader in promoting diversity on campus, followed by supervisors, and then Deans and Directors (Question 3).

However, the survey reveals that there are some areas of expression that the campus environment suppresses; these areas include conservative views and religious beliefs (Question 3). 

Respondents (17.5% of respondents) who have witnessed insensitive or derogatory comments/behaviors by students, faculty or staff cite the most common targets as people with conservative political beliefs, women, racial/ethnic backgrounds and non-English speakers.  Respondents who have witnessed insensitive or derogatory comments/behaviors by administrators cite the most common targets as women, people with conservative political beliefs, racial/ethnic backgrounds and whites (Question 8).  Taking all responses together, the most common sources of these comments and behaviors are faculty, staff, and administrators (Question 10).

Respondents (13.8% of respondents) who have experienced harassment cite the most common reason for this harassment as due to gender and age.  Taking all responses together, the most common sources of harassment are faculty and students (Question 9).

In terms of UMD resources to assist faculty and staff who have experienced or witnessed harassment, the least familiar are the Employee Assistance Program, the online incident reporting form, and the Office of Student Conduct.  For those who utilized any of the UMD resources, there was least satisfaction with the Department of Human Resources and Equal Opportunity and the online reporting form (Question 5).

Group Analysis:  This analysis shows statistically significant differences in campus experiences and perceptions about the campus climate by group (gender, race/ethnicity, length of employment, primary position, etc.).  The first four groupings of questions included 45 questions about the campus climate (Questions 1-4).

  • Staff members experience a statistically more positive campus climate than do faculty (22 out of 45 questions).
  • White faculty and staff members experience a more positive campus climate than do Non-White members (10 out of 45 questions).
  • Men experience a more positive campus climate than do women (7 out of 45 questions)

Responses to Question 7 show that staff members, more than faculty members, and White employees, more than Non-White employees, feel that the overall campus community values diversity. 

Responses to Questions 14b and 15b show that (1) women, more than men, (2) Non-White members, more than White members, and (3) staff, more than faculty, participate in diversity training programs and presentations.

Responses to Questions 16, 17a, and 17b show different perceptions by group membership to how much diversity is or should be valued by respondents themselves and by the campus.

Summary of Spring 2013 UMD  Campus Climate Student Survey Results
Response Rate:    The response rate (4.0%) was disappointingly low, therefore the results represent the experiences and opinions only of the students who participated in the study. While the results provide valuable information in understanding campus climate, caution should be exercised in generalizing the results of this survey to the student body.

Overall Analysis:   Based on the mean response values, student respondents experience a campus environment that is generally satisfactory and supportive (Questions 1, 2 and 4).  There is consensus that diversity is necessary to create a culture of academic excellence (Question 3) and that the current priority that campus places on diversity is appropriate (Questions 29 and 30).

Students feel that among the various groups at UMD, students value diversity the least (Question 8).

Respondents (27.6%) who have witnessed harassment or discriminatory behavior cite other students as the main source of this behavior (Question 19 and 22).  In addition, students say that the behavior was based most frequently on race followed by gender and sexual orientation (Question 20).

Respondents (20.7%) who have experienced harassment cite other students, then faculty as being the sources of the harassment (Questions 12 and 15).  In addition, students say that the behavior was based most frequently on gender, race, political beliefs, and sexual orientation (Question 13).

In terms of UMD resources to assist students who have experienced or witnesses harassment, the least familiar are the online reporting form and the Office of Equal Opportunity.  The most utilized resources are Health Services and faculty or department heads.  For those who utilized any of the UMD resources, there was least satisfaction with the Office of Student Conduct and the online reporting form (Questions 5 and 6).

Group Analysis:                 
This analysis shows statistically significant differences in campus experiences and perceptions about the campus climate by group (gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, etc.).  The first four groupings of questions included 43 questions about the campus climate (Questions 1-4).

  • White students experience a more positive campus climate than do Non-white students (29 out of 43 questions).
  • Heterosexual students experience a more positive campus climate than do GLB students (26 out of 43 questions).
  • Survey results show that for 7-8 questions out of 43, students from a higher socioeconomic class and non-transfer students experience a more positive campus than do students from a lower socioeconomic class and transfer students.
  • Analysis by gender includes 16 questions in which responses differed between men and women.  However, for 9 of the 16 questions, men experience a more positive climate and for 7 of the 16 questions, women experience a more positive climate.

Women, White students, higher socioeconomic, and non-transfer students more than men, Non-white lower socioeconomic, and transfer students feel that interacting with people different from themselves positively affects their campus experiences (Question 15).

Where there are differences,

  • Heterosexual and White students, more than GLB and Non-white students, feel that UMD values diversity (Question 16).
  • Women, GLB, Non-white, and lower socioeconomic students, more than heterosexual, White, and higher socioeconomic students, value diversity (Question 37).
  • White students and lower socioeconomic students feel that UMD has made diversity a higher priority than do Non-white and higher socioeconomic students (Question 38).
  • Women, GLB, Non-white and higher socioeconomic students feel that diversity should be a higher priority than do men, heterosexual, Non-white and lower socioeconomic students. (Question 39).

Acknowledgements

CCT Assessment Subcommittee:  John Arthur, Jennifer Mencl, Bilin Tsai, Susana Pelayo Woodward
Statistical Analysis:  Jennifer Mencl, Collin VanRyn (MS – Applied and Computational Mathematics)
Report: Bilin Tsai, Susana Pelayo Woodward, Paula Pedersen


 

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