University of Minnesota Duluth Skip to Content Search | People | Departments | Events | News
College of Liberal Arts
Center for Social Research
UMD College of Liberal Arts - Center for Addiction Studies - Common Characteristics, Orientations, and Actions Shared by Drinking Categories at UMD, St. Scholastica, and Lake Superior College

Common Characteristics, Orientations, and Actions Shared by Drinking Categories at UMD, St. Scholastica, and Lake Superior College

The research findings produced by the UMD Center for Addiction Studies in the past two years have identified numerous features that typify different categories of drinkers at three Duluth-area colleges. While a brunt of the research focused on UMD and St. Scholastica students, some features of alcohol using students at Lake Superior College also fit into common threads seen in the other two schools.

Populations of interest at each school, usually divided by gender, were further divided into three categories- at or above the mean drinkers, below the mean drinkers, and nondrinkers- based on calculations of the mean number of drinks on the last partying occasion for each population. While the means varied greatly for each population, the trends found within them did not. These trends are the topic of the present report, and can be described as similarities in characteristics, orientations, and actions of the three drinking categories. What follows is a summary of similarities in these three areas between at or above the mean drinkers, below the mean drinkers, and nondrinkers at UMD and St. Scholastica. In a few cases Lake Superior College is included, as noted below.

Characteristics

Orientations

Actions

While many similarities can clearly be drawn between alcohol users and nonusers on these three campuses, it must be noted that intervention and prevention strategies aimed at lessening the harm caused by heavy alcohol consumption should not be “one size fits all.” They must be tailored to individual institutions and environments. But with an understanding of generalities regarding heavy and nondrinkers, these efforts are afforded a common starting ground and a good place for multi-institution efforts to begin. With implementations of prevention and intervention efforts on the three campuses will come a greater understanding of what each campus needs, which could lead to the beginning of truly unique efforts tailored to specific populations and institutions.