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 Anthropology of Food
Tuesday, 22 July 2014, 09:52 (09:52 AM) CDT, day 203 of 2014
BBC Food
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Sicilian ice-cream in a bread bun. A good solution to a local problem: the Mediterranean heat quickly melts the ice-cream, which is absorbed by the bread.
"Palermo, Sicily
Italy
A Fistful of Rice.
A Fistfull of Rice
Nepal
Claire Kathleen Roufs eating first food at 5 months.
Claire Kathleen Roufs
U.S.A.
Eating rat.
"Eating Rat At
The New Year
"
Vietnam
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Desert People, boy eating "grub worm"
Desert People
Australia

Waffles

Under Construction
Sorry for the Inconvenience

see also
 Bread
Wheat


Waffle

 Waffle

Wikimedia



In the News . . .

 

 

 
waffle
NOUN:  
  1. (countable) A flat pastry pressed with a grid pattern.
    The brunch was waffles with strawberries and whipped cream.

  2. countable, UK) A potato waffle, a savoury flat potato cake with the same kind of grid pattern.
ETYMOLOGY:   The Dutch word wafel was adopted into English in the 1700s. The Dutch word, in turn, derives from the Middle Low German wāfel (modern German Waffel), which was borrowed into Middle English around 1377 as wafer, and which is also the source of the French gaufre. Wāfel, in turn, derives from the Old High German waba, wabo (modern German Wabe), meaning honeycomb and ultimately related to the word weave. The verb sense "to smash" derives from the manner in which waffle-batter is smashed into its shape between the two halves of a waffle iron, and the sense "to press a waffle pattern into" derives from the pattern the waffle-iron-halves impart.
VERB:  
  1. waffle (third-person singular simple present waffles, present participle waffling, simple past and past participle waffled)
ETYMOLOGY 2:   From the Scots waffle, "to waver, to flutter", a variation of the Scots waff ("to flutter, to wave", related to wave), with the suffix -le added. Alternatively, perhaps derived from waff, an imitation of a dog's (unintelligible and thus meaningless) yelp (cf woof). Also note Old English wæflian (“to talk foolishly”).
VARIANT FORMS:   waffled
 
 

 Detail from Pieter Bruegel's Het gevecht tussen Carnaval en Vasten - among the first known images of waffles.

Detail from Het gevecht tussen Carnaval en Vasten
("The Fight Between Carnival and Lent ")
-- among the first known images of waffles

(1559)


Wikipedia

 

 Bel-Gem waffle eaters at the New York City World’s Fair, 1964.

Four Girls Eating Belgian Waffles
©Bill Cotter, All Rights Reserved
World's Fair Photos
1964-65 New York World's Fair\Set 123, #009

Bel-Gem waffle eaters at the New York City World’s Fair, 1964.
The “Belgian Waffle” was publically introduced in America on 21 April 1962
by Walter Cleyman at the "Century 21" Seattle World’s Fair,
where they became its sweet treat sensation—piled high with whipped cream and fresh strawberries.
Pumpkin Waffles
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