Eastern Europe

The Iron Range became the destination for many immigrants from Bohemia (Czechoslovakia), Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, and other countries in eastern Europe. Forcing them out were population pressures, lack of farm land, lack of employment and the fear of conscription into invading armies. The 1830's to 1860's saw the greatest influx of immigrants from these areas.

Immigration from eastern Europe and Russian peaked in 1914 and then almost entirely stopped because of the turmoil in the area during and after the First World War. Then there was the disastrous return of many Finns to Karelia in the vain hope that the Russian Revolution really meant a Utopia.

Many of the Scriptures which they brought with them were in the Cyrillic script, which underwent a modification after the Revolution, making them difficult for all but the older people to read. Then some countries rejected the Cyrillic script in favor of the Roman, which again made a separation between generations.

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Page of hand written text
New Testament in
Ancient and Modern Greek
Brittish and Foreign Bible Society, 1842
Page of hand written text
Slovenian Bible
Brittish and Foreign Bible Society, 1914
Page of hand written text
Czech
New Testament
Prague, 1872
Page of hand written text
Ukranian New Testament
Brittish and Foreign Bible Society, 1904
Page of text
Polish Psalms
Brittish and Foreign Bible Society, 1896

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