Kathryn A. Martin Library

Roger Duvoisin

1904 - 1980

(1976 Kerlan Award)

 

The Kerlan Award is given "in recognition of singular attainments in the creation of children's literature and in appreciation for generous donation of unique resources to the Kerlan Collection for the study of children's literature." The books listed below are owned by the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD) Library.

Author/Illustrator

Duvoisin, Roger. (1952). A for the Ark. New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC D9876af

When God commands Noah to take two of every kind of animal into the Ark, Noah goes straight through the alphabet to make sure he doesn't miss any.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1945). The Christmas whale. New York: Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876wh

When Santa's reindeer get the flu a week before Christmas, the whale comes to the rescue.=

Duvoisin, Roger. (1973). The crocodile in the tree. New York : Knopf; distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC D9876cr

A crocodile befriended by the barnyard animals tries to prove to the farmer's wife that he can be her friend too.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1977). Crocus. New York : Knopf ; distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC D9876cro

The barnyard friends of Crocus the crocodile love and admire him for his fierce-looking teeth. When he must have them pulled, life changes for all the animals.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1954). Easter treat. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876ea

Santa Claus decides that he wants to see the spring flowers and Easter time, so he orders a mail-order suit and travels incognito, but the children recognize his beard, nose and twinkle.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1980). The importance of Crocus. New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC D9876im

Crocus the crocodile discovers his special talents when the Sweetpeas build a pond on their property.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1973). Jasmine. New York : Knopf; distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC D9876ja

When Jasmine the cow begins wearing a hat, the other barnyard animals criticize her for trying to be different.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1963). Lonely Veronica. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D2765Lo

Relates how Veronica the hippopotamus was brought to America, locked up in a partially constructed building, and was at last taken to live in the country.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1950). Petunia. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876pe

Petunia, the goose, learns that possessing knowledge doesn't’t mean carrying a book around constantly.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1951). Petunia and the song. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876pes

Petunia's efforts to find the source of a song within the farm house result in catching an apple thief.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1965). Petunia, I love you. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876pei

A raccoon tricks Petunia into walking in the forest with him, in hopes of a goose dinner, but his plans are foiled and they end up as true friends.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1979). Snowy and Woody. New York : Knopf : distribution by Random House. PRIM-FIC D2765sn

A polar bear and a brown bear help camouflage each other.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1963). Spring snow. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC D9876sp

Story of an incredible snow storm on the first day of spring. Of how it snowed for days and nights until the sun came out from behind the clouds and discovered the only thing it could see was snow.

Duvoisin, Roger. (1941). The three sneezes and other Swiss tales. New York : Knopf. 398.2 D9875t

Thirty-seven folk tales from the French and German areas of Switzerland.

Illustrator

Calhoun, Mary. (1962). The hungry leprechaun. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Morrow. PRIM-FIC C1528hu

Once upon a time when everyone in Ireland was poor and hungry, young Patrick O’Callahan plans to get rich by catching a leprechaun, but the one he catches is also poor and hungry and moreover he has almost forgotten how to make his magic work.

Calhoun, Mary. (1958). Wobble, the witch cat. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Morrow. PRIM-FIC C1528wo

Wobble the witch cat can’t hold on to Maggie the witch’s slippery new broom and tries to avoid riding with her until an unexpected solution to the problem presents itself.

Carlson, Natalie Savage. (1952). The talking cat : and other stories of French Canada. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Harper. 398.2 C284t

Seven tales that helped comprise the evenings' entertainment for French Canadians before radio and television.

Courlander, Harold (Ed.). (1955). Ride with the sun; an anthology of folk tales and stories from the United Nations. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey of McGraw-Hill. 398.21 C8614r

Folk tales from The Pacific, Eastern and South Asia, Asian and African Middle East, Africa, Europe, and The Americas includes each of the sixty countries which make up the United Nations.

Dayton, Mona. (1969). Earth and sky. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC D2765EA

The earth and sky debate their respective merits and continue living together happily.

Fatio, Louise.(1954). The Happy Lion. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw-Hill. PRIM-FIC D253ha & Teaching LB1573 .S325 1990x Suppl. K-1-16

The happy lion in the zoo gets away and finds a friend.

Fatio, Louise. (1964). The Happy Lion and the bear. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. PRIM-FIC F253HAQ

The Happy Lion and the new bear are both afraid of each other and spend their days roaring and growling until the zoo-keeper's son needs their help.

Fatio, Louise. (1955). The Happy Lion in Africa. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. PRIM-FIC F253HAR

When the Happy Lion is kidnapped from the zoo, he flees from his kidnapper, first into the hold of a ship bound for Africa, and then into the African forest, where he finds life very strange and difficult.

Fatio, Louise. (1957). The happy lion roars. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. PRIM-FIC F253HAS

The Happy Lion is extremely unhappy because he is lonesome, so when a circus comes around and he sees the Beautiful Lioness, he brings her back to the zoo with him.

Fatio, Louise. (1961). The Happy Lion's quest. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. PRIM-FIC F253HAT

The Happy Lion is so sad because he misses his friend, the keeper’s son, that he sets out to visit the boy at the lycée, and is helped unknowingly by those who are trying to capture him.

Fatio, Louise. (1974). The Happy Lion’s rabbits. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw-Hill. PRIM-FIC F253hau

The Happy Lion and François discover that to offer protection from hunters to one rabbit is to be soon overrun by rabbits.

Fatio, Louise. (1971). The Happy Lion's treasure. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw-Hill. PRIM-FIC F253HAW

Even though he isn't sure what his treasure is, the Happy Lion wants to share it with his friends.

Fatio, Louise.(1967). The Happy Lion's vacation. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw-Hill. PRIM-FIC F253hav

A story about the happy lion and the problems that he encounters when he attempts to take a vacation with the zoo keeper’s son.

Fatio, Louise. (1975). Marc and Pixie, and the walls in Mrs. Jones's garden. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw. PRIM-FIC F253ma

The Siamese cat changes the atmosphere, especially for a fat chipmunk, in the Jones's happy garden.

Fatio, Louise. (1959). The three happy lions. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. PRIM-FIC F253TH

The Happy Lion and the lioness send their cub, Francois, out into the world to find an occupation.

Frost, Frances Mary. (1949). The little whistler. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : McGraw-Hill. 811 F9393L

Poems written about the four seasons.

Ginsburg, Mirra. (1976). Which is the best place? (Adapted from the Russian of Pyotr Dudochkin by Mirra Ginsburg ; Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Macmillan. PRIM-FIC G4935WH

The rooster on the fence and the goose on the grass argue about which place is best and get a different answer from each animal friend they consult.

Hall, William Norman. (1948). Christmas pony. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : A. A. Knopf. PRIM-FIC H1813ch

Chris the pony and his friends the turkey and the rabbit get their Christmas wish when they can all stay together on a new farm.

Hertz, Grete Janus. (1964). Teddy. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop. PRIM-FIC J355te

In this picture book for very small children Teddy Bear tells youngsters about the objects most familiar to them. He points out his bib, his little chair, his bed, and other objects.

Lipkind, William. (1966). Nubber Bear. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Harcourt, Brace & World. PRIM-FIC L7646NU

Nubber Bear wants honey, even if he has to disobey and get punished for doing it.

Martin, Patricia Miles. (1959). The pointed brush. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC M3824po

Little Sixth Son feels helpless to assist his family when Elder Uncle is falsely accused of theft until he discovers that his ability to write is the key to helping free his uncle.

Menotti, Gian Carlo. (1952). Amahl and the night visitors. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House. INTR-FIC M5474AM

The story of a crippled shepherd boy who entertains the Wise Men on their way to Bethlehem, the simple gift he gives them for the Christ Child, and the miraculous gift he receives in return.

Moran, Jim. (1954). Sophocles, the hyena : a fable. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Whittlesey House . PRIM-FIC M8294so

When a fast-talking cat named Morris convinces a dog, a duck, and a mole to go with him to Cat School to learn how to meow, they are joined by a hungry hyena with dangerous plans.

Perrault, Charles. (1959). Favorite Fairy tales told in France. (Retold from Charles Perrault and other French storytellers by Virginia Haviland. Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). Boston : Little, Brown and Co. 398.2 H388f

The twelve dancing princesses.-Puss in boots.-Beauty and the beast.-The sleeping beauty in the wood.-Drakestail.

Puner, Helen W. (1946). Daddies, what they do all day. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. PRIM-FIC P9843da

Rhyming text describes a number of different vocations.

Showalter, Jean B. (1966). Around the corner. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). Garden City, N.Y. : Doubleday. PRIM-FIC S5597ar

New things are in store for the inquisitive young reader who follows Jiimy around the corner in pursuit of a runaway duck.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1951). Autumn harvest. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799AU

Shows the progression of autumn harvest from first chill and first harvest to frost, final storage of crops, and bare trees.

Tresselt, Alvin. (1958). The frog in the well. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. PRIM-FIC T799FR

When his well dries up, a frog goes out into the world.

Tresselt, Alvin. (1948). Johnny Maple-Leaf. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. PRIM-FIC T799JO

Shows the cycle of leaves in the forest.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1970). The beaver pond. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. 574.92 T799b

The beavers dam a stream and create a pond which is valuable to many creatures.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1950). Follow the wind. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799Fo

No animals or mountains can follow or stop the wind, until at last it grows tired and gentle and rocks itself to sleep.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1950). "Hi, Mister Robin!" (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799HI

Despite the cold and dreary weather, Mr. Robin helps a little boy discover the hidden signs of spring.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1965). Hide and seek fog. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799HID

A fog rolls in from the sea for three days and only the children enjoy it.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1954). I saw the sea come in. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. PRIM-FIC T799I

A little boy spends the morning playing on the beach as the tide comes in.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1949). Sun up. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799su

Follows the activities of a farmer and his son from sunrise to sunset on a hot summer day.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1957). Wake up city! (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799WAC

Describes the way a city wakes up.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1955). Wake up, farm! (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard. PRIM-FIC T799WAF

Relates the morning activities and sounds of a variety of farm animals, and the last one on the farm to wake up, a little boy in the big farmhouse.

Tresselt, Alvin R. (1947). White snow, bright snow. (Illustrated by Roger Duvoisin). New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. PRIM-FIC T799WH

When it begins to look, feel, and smell like snow, everyone prepares for a winter blizzard.

Tworkov, Jack. (1951). The camel who took a walk. (Pictures by Roger Duvoisin). New York : E.P. Dutton. PRIM-FIC T9746ca

A suspense story of what didn't happen to the camel when he reached the spot where "the shadow of the tree falls across the road."

 

Author/Illustrator Information

Berman, R. (2001). Roger Duvoisin. The Kerlan Awards in children's literature, 1975-2001 (pp. 24-25). St. Paul: Pogo Press. Children REF PN 497 .K47 2001

Eclipse Mother Goose: A Scolarly Exploration: Roger Duvoisin. http://eclipse.rutgers.edu/goose/zam/duvbio.aspx

Roger Duvoisin Papers (de Grummond Collection, University of Southern Mississippi) http://www.lib.usm.edu/~degrum/html/research/findaids/duvoisin.html

Duvoisin, Roger (Antoine) 1904- 1980. (1983). In Something about the author (Vol. 30, pp. 101-107). Detroit: Gale. PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

Duvoisin, Roger (Antoine) 1904- 1980. (1981). In Something about the author (Vol. 23, pp. 68). Detroit: Gale. PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

Duvoisin, Roger (Antoine) 1904- . (1971). In Something about the author (Vol. 2, pp. 95-97). Detroit: Gale. PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 

For more information, contact:
Martha Eberhart, Reference Librarian
Email: meberhar@d.umn.edu
Phone: 218-726-8733
Fax: 218-726-7481
416 Library Drive
Duluth, MN 55812

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Revised and updated 6/17/13

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