Maurice (Bernard) Sendak

1928 - 2012

(1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award)

 

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award was first given to its namesake in 1954 by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. The award, a bronze medal, honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. Between 1960 and 1980, the Wilder Award was given every five years. From 1980 to 2001, it was awarded every three years. Beginning in 2001, it has been awarded every two years. The award information was retrieved from the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award website. The call numbers for the books owned by the UMD library are provided after the citation.

Author/Illustrator

Sendak, Maruice. (2011). Bumble-ardy. New York : Harper Collins. PRIM-FIC S4746bu

Bumble-ardy the pig has missed eight birthdays in a row. So for his ninth birthday he has a party without telling his aunt. What will happen when she comes home

Sendak, Maurice. (1962). Chicken soup with rice; a book of months. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746CH

 Tells about every month -- and chicken soup with rice.

Sendak, Maurice. (1967). Higglety pigglety pop! or, There must be more to life. New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746HI

When Jennie, the sealyham terrier, goes out into the world looking for something more than everything, she finds out that the World Mother Goose Theatre is preparing a production of Higglety pigglety pop but she needs experience to become its leading lady.

Sendak, Maurice. (1970). In the night kitchen. New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746IN

A little boy’s dream-fantasy in which he helps three fat bakers get milk for their cake batter.

Sendak, Marurice. (1984, c1956). Kenny's window. New York : Harper Collins. PRIM-FIC S4346ke

 With some help from his dog, two toy soldiers, and his teddy bear, Kenny learns that to get to the garden of your dreams, you must never give up on hopes or dreams, no matter how hard they seem to achieve.

Sendak, Maurice. (2006). Mommy? (Scenario by Arthur Yorinks; pager engineering by Matthew Reinhart). New York : Michael di Capua Books/Scholastic. PRIM-FIC S4746mo

 While looking for his mother in a haunted house, a little boy plays pranks on the monster inhabitants. Features pop-up illustrations on foldout pages.

Sendak, Maurice. (1962). Nutshell library. New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746nu Vols. 1-4

 Four small books: [1] Alligators all around; an alphabet.--[2] Chicken soup with rice; a book of months.--[3] One was Johnny; a counting book.--[4] Pierre; a cautionary tale in five chapters and a prologue.

Sendak, Maurice. (1990). One was Johnny : a counting book. New York : HarperCollins. PRIM-FIC S4746on

Johnny welcomes, and counts a stream of visitors, 10 in all.

Sendak, Maurice. (1981). Outside over there. (Calligraphy by Jeanyee Wong). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746OU

With Papa off to sea and Mama despondent, Ida must go outside over there to rescue her baby sister from goblins who steal her to be a goblin’s bride.

Sendak, Maurice. (1988). The sign on Rosie's door. New York : HarperCollins Publishers. PRIM-FIC S4746si

Rosie and her friends have many adventures when she transforms herself into "Alinda."

 Sendak, Maurice. (1976). Some swell pup : or, Are you sure you want a dog? (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. PRIM-FIC S4746so

The Wise Passerby helps two children establish a happy relationship with their new rambunctious puppy.

Sendak, Maurice. (2005, c1985). Very far away. New York : Harper Collins. PRIM-FIC S4746ve

Martin goes off to find someplace "very far away" and runs into a horse, a bird, and a cat who are all looking for their "ideal spot."

Sendak, Maurice. (1963). Where the wild things are. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC S4746WH

 A naughty little boy, sent to bed without his supper, sails to the land of the wild things where he becomes their king.

Illustrator

Chanover, Hyman and Alice. (n.d.) Happy Hanukah everybody. (Illustrations by Maurice Sendak). New York : United Synagogue Commission on Jewish Education. 296.43 C458h

Tells of how a family celebrates Hanukah.

De Jong, Meindert. (1958). Along came a dog. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. INTR-FIC D327ALO

 A stray dog earns a home for himself by protecting a little red hen and her chicks from a preying hawk.

De Jong, Meindert. (1956). The house of sixty fathers. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. INTR-FIC D327HOU

 Alone in a sampan with his pig and three ducklings, a little Chinese boy is whirled down a raging river, back to the town from which he and his parents had escaped the invading Japanese, and spends long and frightening days regaining his family and new home.

De Jong, Meindert. (1953). Hurry home, Candy. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York, Harper. INTR-FIC D327HUR

 A pup forced into the lonely, precarious existence of a stray eventually finds a warm lasting companionship.

De Jong, Meindert. (1955). The little cow and the turtle. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. INTR-FIC D327LI

 A little cow befriends three hoboes who feed her honey, two little boys who feed her apples, and a turtle on a valiant journey to the lake.

De Jong, Meindert. (1953). Shadrach. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. INTR-FIC D327SHA

 Davie finds it almost unbelievable that he has a pet rabbit all his own, and he’s devastated on the day he goes out to the barn and finds that Shadrach has slipped out of his hutch and disappeared.

De Jong, Meindert. (1962). The singing hill. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. INTR-FIC D327SIN

 A little boy moves to the country with his family and gets a new hat which floats down a stream, gets chewed by a horse, and protects a skunk’s house from the rain.

De Jong, Meindert. (1954). The wheel on the school. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. INTR-FIC D327WH

 Six students in a tiny Dutch sea town engage practically the whole population in an effort to attract storks to nest on the town’s roofs again.

DeRegniers, Beatrice Schenk. (1953). The giant story. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak ). New York : Harper & Brothers. PRIM-FIC D431gi

 Tommy’s day as a giant was wonderful until he made the mistake of saying giants never get sleepy.

De Regniers, Beatrice Schenk. (1988). Sing a song of popcorn : every child's book of poems. (Illustrated by Marcia Brown and eight other Caldecott Medal artists). New York : Scholastic Inc. 808.81 S6175

 A collection of 115 poems by a variety of well-known authors with illustrations by nine Caldecott medalists.

De Regniers, Beatrice Schenk. (1955). What can you do with a shoe? (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC D431ma

 Asks what you can do with various things.

Graves, Robert. (1985, c1962). The big green book. (Illustrated by Maurice Sendak). New York : Macmillan. PRIM-FIC G7764BI

 A little boy finds a big green book in the attic and learns many handy magic spells that he uses with surprising results.

Grimm. (1973). The juniper tree, and other tales from Grimm. (Selected by Lore Segal and Maurice Sendak. Translated by Lore Segal, with four tales tanslated by Randall Jarrell.Pictures by Maurice Sendak ).  New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 398.2 K51

 Twenty-seven newly translated fairy tales from Grimm including many old favorites as well as such lesser-known tales as "The Juniper Tree," "Many-Fur," and "Brother Gaily."

Grimm, Jacob. (1973). King Grisly-Beard; a tale from the brothers Grimm. (Translated by Edgar Taylor. Pictures by Maurice Sendak ). New York : Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 398.2 G864ko

Because of her hateful pride, the king gives his daughter in marriage to the first beggar that comes to the door.

Hoffmann, E. T. A. (1984). Nutcracker. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Crown. INTR-FIC H7115NU

 After hearing how her toy nutcracker got his ugly face, a little girl helps break the spell and changes him into a handsome prince.

Jarrell, Randall. (1965). The animal family. (Decorations by Maurice Sendak). New York : Pantheon Books. INTR-FIC J376A

 After a mermaid comes to his island cottage, the hunter brings home a bear and a lynx to live with them, and one day the bear and the lynx bring home a boy.

Jarrell, Randal. (1964). The bat-poet. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Macmillan. INTR-FIC J376B

 A bat who can’t sleep days makes up poems about the woodland creatures he now perceives for the first time.

Joslin, Sesyle. (1958). What do you say, dear? (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Young Scott Books. PRIM-FIC J835WH

 Uses exotic and humerous examples to present guidelines for handling the social situations children must commonly cope with.

Krauss, Ruth. (2005). Bears. (Pictures by Maurice Sendeak; hand lettering by Tom Starace). New York : HarperCollins. PRIM-FIC K919be

 A familiar boy in a wolf suit heads for bed with his teddy bear. But before the boy can fall asleep, his jealous dog snatches the bear and runs away, hiding among a great many bears in a great many places. A story written with 27 words.

Krauss, Ruth. (1957). The birthday party. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York, Harper. PRIM-FIC K919BI

 David goes to his first birthday party, which turns out to be his own.

Krauss, Ruth. (1952). A hole is to dig : a first book of first definitions. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Brothers. PRIM-FIC K919ho

 A book for young children that explains and illustrates simple and easily understood defintions such as a hole is to dig, hands are to hold, and arms are to hug.

Krauss, Ruth. (1953). A very special house. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC K919VE

 The little boy of this story knows just what a very special house should be. It would have a bed to bounce on, a table "very special where to put your feet" and it would be a place to bring friends -- a lion, a giant, some monkeys. Best of all, it would always suggest "MORE" and be a place where "NOBODY ever says stop."

Kushner, Tony. (2003). Brundibar. (Pictures by Maruice Sendak ; after the opera by Hans Krása and Adolf Hoffmeister). New York, NY : Michael di Capua Books/Hyperion Books for Children. 782.1 K97b

Aninku and Pepicek find their mother sick one morning, they need to buy her milk to make her better. The brother and sister go to town to make money by singing. But a hurdy-gurdy grinder, Brundibar, chases them away. They are helped by three talking animals and three hundred schoolchildren, to defeat the bully. Brundibar is based on a Czech opera for children that was performed fifty-five times by the children of Terezin, a Nazi concentration camp in 1943.

MacDonald, Betty Bard. (1954). Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle's farm. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). Philadelphia : Lippincott. INTR-FIC M135MPF

 Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle is back with special cures for the not truthful, the pet forgetter, the fraidy-cat, the destructive child, and the child who continually says, "I can’t find it."

MacDonald, George. (1976). The golden key. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). (2nd ed). New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. INTR-FIC M1354GO

 A boy and a girl, Mossy and Tangle, lead a mysterious life full of travels and wonders.

MacDonald, George. (1977). The light princess. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). (2nd ed). New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. PRIM-FIC M135LI

Because she is not invited to the christening of the princess, the King’s sister casts a spell depriving the child of gravity and the ability to weep tears.

MacDonald, George. (1969). The light princess. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. PRIM-FIC M135L

 Because she is not invited to the christening of the princess, the King’s sister casts a spell depriving the child of gravity and the ability to weep tears.

Marshall, James. (1999). Swine Lake. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : HarperCollins Publishers. PRIM-FIC M368sw

An old wolf goes to the ballet to eat some pigs, but becomes so enthralled with the dancing he jumps on the stage to join in, making a guest appearance as the monster of the story.

Maurice Sendak. (2007?). In Artist to artist : 23 major illustrators talk to children about their art (pp. 74-77). New York : Philomel Books. 741.6 A787

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1959). Father Bear comes home. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC M663FA

 Describes the adventures of Little Bear in which he goes fishing, has the hiccups, looks for a mermaid, and welcomes Father Bear home from the sea.

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1968). A kiss for Little Bear. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC M663KI

 Little Bear’s thank-you kiss from grandmother gets passed on to him by many animals and greatly aids the skunks’ romance.

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1957). Little bear. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC M663LB

 Little Bear’s four adventures include taking a trip to the moon and having a birthday party.

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1960). Little Bear's friend. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC M663LK

 One summer Little Bear makes friends with Emily and her doll Lucy.

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1961). Little Bear's visit. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC M663Lv

 Little Bear enjoys a visit with his grandparents

Minarik, Else Holmelund. (1958). No fighting, no biting! (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC M663NO

 Sometimes Rosa and Willy behave like the two little alligators in the stories Cousin Joan tells them.

Sawyer, Ruth. (1952). Maggie Rose, her birthday Christmas. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. INTR-FIC S2718M

 An eight-year-old Maine girl determines in June to sell enough berries that summer so that she and her shiftless family can give a proper celebration for her birthday Christmas.

Sendak, Jack. (1956). The happy rain. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Brothers. PRIM-FIC S4744ha

The people of Troekan had the finest, wettest, unending rain until one day and not the the oldest man, the scientist or the philosopher could bring it back.

Sendak, Philip. (1985). In grandpa's house. (Translated and adapted by Seymour Barofsky; pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. INTR-FIC S4748IN

 A huge talking bird, a friendly giant, and other fantastic creatures help David find his missing grandfather and discover the lessons every Jewish boy should know.

Singer, Isaac Bashevis. (1966). Zlateh the goat, and other stories. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. 398.2 S617z

 Presents a stories from Middle-European Jewish folklore and legends, where the cruelties of life can be offset by visits from angels and demons.

Stockton, Frank Richard. (1964). The bee-man of Orn. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston. INTR-FIC S8664Be

 When a Sorcerer tells him that he has been transformed from another sort of being, the Bee-man sets out to discover what he was in his earlier incarnation.

Udry, Janice May. (1959). The moon jumpers. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper. PRIM-FIC U218MO

 Four children play in the moonlight before bedtime on a soft summer night.

Zolotow, Charlotte. (1962). Mr. Rabbit and the lovely present. (Pictures by Maurice Sendak). New York : Harper & Row. PRIM-FIC Z86M

 Mr. Rabbit tries to help a little girl decide on the perfect birthday gift for her mother and together they finally do find the perfect gift.

Multimedia

Bangs, L., & Jonze, S. (2010). Tell them anything you want [videorecording] : a portrait of Maurice Sendak. [New York, N.Y.] : Distributed by Oscilloscope Pictures. DVD PS3569.E6 Z945 2010

This is a deeply moving portrait of Maurice Sendak, a seminal talent who is conflicted with his success, and whose lifelong obsession with death has subtly and ironically influenced his work. Now 81, Sendak is best known for his first book, Where the wild things are, which he wrote after spending ten years as an illustrator. Through his own words, firsthand photos, and illustrations, Sendak offers a rare, intimate, and unexpected look at his exceptional life.

Author Information

Maurice Sendak (1928- ). (2006). In Something about the author (Vol. 165, pp. 192-200). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

Maurice (Bernard) Sendak (1928- ). (2000). In Something about the author (Vol. 113, pp. 160-170). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 Maurice (Bernard) Sendak (1928- ). (1982). In Something about the author (Vol. 27, pp. 180-201). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 Maurice (Bernard) Sendak (1928- ). (1971). In Something about the author (Vol. 1, pp. 190-191). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

Sendak, Maruice. (2008). 1964 Where the wild things are. In L. S. Marcus. A Caldecott celebration : seven artists and their paths to the Caldecott medal (pp. 19-25). New York : Walker & Co. 741.6 M322c

 

 

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