Kathryn A. Martin Library

Theodor S. Geisel (Dr. Seuss)

1940-1991

(1980 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award)

 

The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award was first given to its namesake in 1954 by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association. The award, a bronze medal, honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. Between 1960 and 1980, the Wilder Award was given every five years. From 1980 to 2001, it was awarded every three years. Beginning in 2001, it has been awarded every two years. The award information was retrieved from the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award website. The call numbers for the books owned by the UMD library are provided after the citation.

Author/Illustrator

Seuss, Dr. (1938). The 500 hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. New York : Vanguard Press. PRIM-FIC S496FI

 At first, Bartholomew Cubbins had just one hat, but when the King ordered him to take it off, he found that he cound not--each time there was another on his head.

Seuss, Dr. (1937). And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street. New York : The Vanguard Press. PRIM-FIC S496AN

A boy imagines a series of incredible sights on his way home from school so that he will have an interesting report to give his father.

Seuss, Dr. (1989, c1937). And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496an 1989

A boy imagines a series of incredible sights on his way home from school so that he will have an interesting report to give his father.

Seuss, Dr. (1977). Bartholomew and the oobleck. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496bar

The King, tired of rain, snow, sun, and fog, commands his magicians to make something else come down from the sky, but when oobleck falls, in sticky, greenish droplets, Bartholomew Cubbins shames the king and saves the kingdom.

Seuss, Dr. (1984). The butter battle book. New York : Random House.  PRIM-FIC S496bu

Engaged in a long-running battle, the Yooks and the Zooks develop more and more sophisticated weaponry as they attempt to outdo each other.

 Seuss, Dr.. (1985, c1957). The cat in the hat. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496CAT

 Two children sitting at home on a rainy day are invited by the cat in the hat who shows them some tricks and games.

Seuss, Dr. (1958). The cat in the hat comes back! New York: Random House. PRIM-FIC S496CAV

The cat in the hat comes back to play one snowy afternoon.

Seuss, Dr. (1963). Dr. Seuss's ABC. New York : Beginner Books. PRIM-FIC S496D

 Dr. Seuss rhymes letters with all sorts of words to show the sounds of letters and how the letters grow into words.

Seuss, Dr. (1965). Fox in socks. New York : Beginner Books. PRIM-FIC S496FO

The smart fox uses difficult tongue twisters to get the confused Mr. Knox in trouble with his tongue.

Seuss, Dr. (1960). Green eggs and ham. New York : Beginner Books; distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC S496GR

 The principle that things are not always what they might appear to be is illustrated in rhyme.

Seuss, Dr. (1988). Green eggs and ham. New York : Beginner Books. PRIM-FIC S496gr 1988

Sam-I-am relentlessly pursues a furry top-hatted creature trying every way he can think of to get the creature to eat green eggs and ham. The well-known, cleverly illustrated creatures and the silly rhyming text are perpetual favorites of young children.

Seuss, Dr. (1959). Happy birthday to you! New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496HAP

Describes a birthday celebration in Katroo presided over by the Birthday Bird.

Dr. Seuss.(1991, c1963). Hop on Pop. New York : Beginner Books. PRIM-FIC S496hn

 Pairs of rhyming words are introduced and used in simple sentences, such as "Day. Play. We play all day. Night. Fight. We fight all night."

Seuss, Dr. (1940). Horton hatches the egg. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496HO

When a lazy bird hatching an egg wants a vacation, she asks Horton, the elephant, to sit on her egg--which he does through all sorts of hazards until he is rewarded for doing what he said he would.

Seuss, Dr. (1954). Horton hears a Who! New York : Random

 House. PRIM-FIC S496HRE A city of Whos on a speck of dust are threatened with destruction until the smallest Who of all helps convince Horton’s friends that Whos really exist.

Dr. Seuss. (1978). I can read with my eyes shut. New York : Beginner Books. PRIM-FIC S496IAE

 The Cat in the Hat takes Young Cat in tow to show him the fun he can get out of reading.

Seuss, Dr. (1956). If I ran the circus. New York :

 Random House. PRIM-FIC S496ie A young boy imagines the fantastic animals and incredible acts he will have for his greatest of all circuses.

Seuss, Dr. (1950). If I ran the zoo. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496IF

If Gerald McGrew ran the zoo, he’d let all the animals go and fill it with more unusual beasts--a ten-footed lion, an Elephant-Cat, a Mulligatawny, a Tufted Mazurka, and others.

Seuss. Dr. (1967, c1939). The king's stilts. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496ki

When the King’s stilts are stolen and hidden, and he can no longer enjoy his play hour, the whole kingdom is threatened with destruction until a brave page boy saves the day.

Seuss, Dr. (1971). The Lorax. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496LO

The Once-ler describes the results of the local pollution problem.

Seuss, Dr. (1972). Marvin K. Mooney, will you please go now! New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496MA

Suggests in rhyme a number of ways for Marvin K. Mooney to travel as long as he gets going--now!

Seuss, Dr. (1947). McElligot's pool. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496MAC

A boy imagines the rare and wonderful fish he might catch in McElligot’s pool.

Seuss, Dr. (1990). Oh, the places you’ll go! New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496oh

Advice in rhyme for proceeding in life; weathering fear, loneliness, and confusion; and being in charge of your actions.

Seuss, Dr. (1955). On beyond zebra. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496ON

A boy’s imagination takes over when he thinks the alphabet should go on beyond z.

Seuss, Dr. (1960). One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish. New York : Beginner Books; distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC S496oo

 A story-poem about the activities of such unusual animals as the Nook, Wump, Yink, Yop, Gack, and the Zeds.

Seuss, Dr. (1997). Seuss-isms : wise and witty prescriptions for living from the good doctor. New York : Random House. 811.52 S496se

Children's poetry.

Seuss, Dr. (1975, c1948). Thidwick, the big-hearted moose. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S944th

When a moose gives a Bingle Bug a ride on his horns, he unwillingly becomes host to a large number of freeloading pests.

Seuss, Dr. (1958). Yertle the turtle, and other stories. New York : Random House. PRIM-FIC S496YE

Includes three humorous stories in verse: Yertle the Turtle, Gertrude McFuzz, and The Big Brag.

Seuss, Dr. (2004). Your favorite Seuss : 13 stories written and illustrated by Dr. Seuss with 13 introductory essays. (Compiled by Janet Schulman and Cathy Goldsmith). New York : Random House Children's Books. PRIM-FIC S496yo

 Who is Dr. Seuss? / by Janet Schulman -- He is everybody’s inner child / by Barbara Bader -- And to think that I saw it on Mulberry Street -- You’re never too old / by Stan and Jan Berenstain -- McElligot’s pool -- Thank you, McGrew / by John Lithgow -- If I ran the zoo -- A gift worth waiting for / by Christopher Cerf -- Horton hears a who! -- And enter the cat / by Christopher Paolini -- The cat in the hat -- The true spirit of the Grinch / by Charles D. Cohen -- How the Grinch stole Christmas -- Yertle, Hitler, and Dr. Seuss / by Richard H. Minear -- Yertle the turtle -- No holiday is more important / by Barbara Mason -- Happy Birthday to you! -- We love Sam / by Starr LaTronica -- Green eggs and ham -- He taught us how to think / by Peter Glassman -- The Sneetches -- Looks like something from Seuss! / by Lane Smith -- Dr. Seuss’s sleep book -- Love it or lose it by Pete Seeger ; with the Environmental Club of Our Lady of Lourdes High School -- The Lorax -- Living with the cat / by Audrey Geisel -- Oh, the places you’ll go!

Biography

Krull, Kathleen. (2004). The boy on Fairfield Street : how Ted Geisel grew up to become Dr. Seuss. (Paintings by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher ; with decorative illustration by Dr. Seuss). New York : Random House. 921 S496k

Introduces the life of renowned children’s author and illustrator Ted Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, focusing on his childhood and youth in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Author Information

Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991). (1999). In Something about the author (Vol. 100, pp. 104-109). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991). (1994). In Something about the author (Vol. 75, pp. 65-71). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991). (1992). In Something about the author (Vol. 67, pp. 78). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991). (1982). In Something about the author (Vol.28, pp. 107-116). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991). (1971). In Something about the author (Vol.1, pp. 104-106). Detroit: Gale. Ref PN 451 .S6 & Online V. 1 - 189, 1971- 2009

 

For more information, contact:
Martha Eberhart, Reference Librarian
Email: meberhar@d.umn.edu
Phone: 218-726-8733
Fax: 218-726-7481
416 Library Drive
Duluth, MN 55812

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Revised and updated 2/7/13

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