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Minnesota
Minerals Education Workshop

 


19th Annual MMEW
June 21-23, 2016
Gustavus Aldophus College

Registration Link (Eventbrite)

IMPORTANT DATES
June 6 - Early Registration Deadline (registration fees increase)
June 10 - Deadline for requesting refunds for registration and dorm rooms

General Information
Workshop Schedule
Short Course Offerings
Field Trips
Tuesday Evening Event
Meals
Lodging
Certificate of Participation
Registration
Short Course Selections
Sponsors
Volunteers
More Information
Campus Map

GENERAL INFORMATION

The MMEW is a three-day workshop for K-12 Earth science educators and pre-service teachers that offers short courses and field trips focused on the geology and mineral resources of Minnesota. The upcoming 19th annual MMEW will be held June 21-23, 2016 at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, MN.  On the first day of the workshop, participants may choose among 16 different short course topics taught by professional geologists, academics, government scientists, and K-12 educators.   Many of the courses introduce curriculum ideas for various grade levels. The second and third days of the workshop will involve field trips and mine tours that are designed to familiarize participants with the geology and mineral resources of south central Minnesota.

Participants will receive a variety of resource materials including rock and mineral samples, lesson plan ideas, posters, maps, videos, and other useful information.   Upon completion of the workshop, attendees will be provided with a certificate of participation indicating total contact hours.

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

The schedule of events for the three-day workshop is listed below. The registration table will be located on the first floor of Nobel Hall (NH), by the world floor maps. All short courses will take place in classrooms in Nobel Hall (NH). Group gatherings will be in Wallenberg Auditorium (WA) in Nobel Hall. Breakfast each day and lunch on Tuesday will be taken in the Gustavus College Dining Center (DC) (see campus map).

Tuesday, June 21

7:00-8:20 Breakfast Buffett (DC), Registration (NH 1st floor)
8:20-8:30 Welcome and Introductions (WA)
8:35-9:50 Short Course Session 1
9:50-10:00 Morning Break (NH-2nd Floor Atrium)
10:00-11:15 Short Course Session 2
11:20-12:00 Midday Presentation (WA)
       Anthony Runkel, Minnesota Geological Survey
        Talk Title: Industrial Mineral Resources of South Central Minnesota with Emphasis on World Class Silica (“Frac”) Sand Deposits
12:05-1:15 Lunch Buffet (DC)
1:30-2:45 Short Course Session 3
2:45-3:00 Afternoon Break (NH-2nd Floor Atrium)
3:00-4:15 Short Course Session 4
4:15-4:45 Overview of Field Trips and Wed/Thurs Field Trips (WA)
4:45-5:00 Collect Materials for Resources Bag (WA)
5:00-5:50 Break
5:50-6:00 Board bus at Nobel Hall for evening picnic
6:00-6:30 Drive to Minneopa State Park
6:30-8:30 Picnic Dinner and Presentation about River Warren and Quaternary Geology of Minneopa State Park
        Guide: Carrie Jennings, Geologist, MN Department of Natural Resources
8:30-9:00 Bus returns to Nobel Hall

Wednesday, June 22

7:00-7:45 Breakfast (DC)
8:00 Depart Gustavus (Front of Nobel Hall) for field trips.
6:00 Return to Gustavus; Dinner on own;
7:30-8:30 Optional evening activity - Tour of Chester Johnson Geology Museum and Linneaus Arboretum

Thursday, June 23

7:00-7:45 Breakfast (DC)
8:00 Depart Gustavus (Front of Nobel Hall) for field trips.
5:00 Return to Gustavus

End of Workshop

 

SHORT COURSE OFFERINGS

The 16 courses being offered during the fiveshort course sessions are described below.  Click on the short course title to see a description of the course. To download a short course selection form, click here: pdf or Word. Participants are asked to identify their first and second choice of courses for each session and the

 

A

B

C

D

Session 1
9:00-10:15

What’s Under Your House?
Kevin Hanson

Karst Geology
Scott Alexander

History of Hydrogeology
Greg Brick

CANCELLED

Geology of Southern Minnesota
Jim Miller

Session 2
10:30-11:45

Rock and Mineral ID
Andrea Reed

Trials and Tribulations of Geologically Protected Aquifers
Bruce Olsen

Flood Protection
Paul Eickenberg

The Long Glacial History of Southern MN
Carrie Jennings

Session 3
1:45-3:00

Sustainablity of Mineral Resources
Jim Miller

A Recipe for “Asphalt”
Christina Morrison

Origin of MN Iron Ores
Dick Ojakangas

Physical Properties of Industrial Sand
Sara Welna & Stephanie Theriault

Session 4
3:15-4:30

Mineral Resources - Occurrences & Uses
Ken Reid

Construction Aggregates of Southern MN
Steve Bjerke

Soudan Mine
Scott Alexander

Sediment and Nurtient Pollution in Rivers & Lakes
Patrick Baskfield

SESSION 1

1A) WHAT’S UNDER YOUR HOUSE?
       Kevin Hanson, Geographic Information Systems Analyst, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources  
With a simple click a new web map allows users access to the geologic information below their house. The web map application called 'What's Under Your House' was developed by the Minnesota DNR and put on display at the 2015 Minnesota State Fair. Geologic information includes soils data from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and glacial geology, depth to bedrock, and bedrock geology data from the Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS). All of the original data was simplified by the DNR with assistance from the MGS. Participants of the course will be given the tools and resources to navigate the web map in order to educate students from 4th grade to 12th grade on Minnesota's geology. The course will also preview more complex Minnesota geology web maps for greater geologic detail.
GRADE LEVEL – ES, MS, HS

1B) KARST GEOLOGY IN MINNESOTA
       Scott Alexander, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota
The karst environment in Minnesota includes sinkholes, caves, and springs in both limestones and sandstones.  These bedrock units are some of our state's most productive water supplies.  They also provide access to a deeply buried environment that hosts many important species (bats) and has preserved a record of past climate and biota.  Scientists are studying climate records preserved in stalagmites as well as the bones of animals trapped long ago in the caves (including saber toothed tiger kittens).
GRADE LEVEL - (ES), MS, HS

1C) HISTORY OF HYDROGEOLOGY   CANCELLED   
       Greg Brick,
Instructor, University of Minnesota            
Teaching a subject can sometimes be made easier by finding a historical anecdote, human situation, or segue that students can relate to. In this fast-paced survey you’ll learn the story of groundwater from its earliest roots to the present, providing you with unique perspectives. Topics include hydromythology, the water cycle, groundwater supply, the theory of groundwater flow and well hydraulics, geochemistry, contaminant hydrogeology, and karst hydrogeology. Minnesota examples will be used for illustration where possible. Classroom interactive exercises will be offered. Never before has the history of hydrogeology been formally presented in Minnesota—and rarely elsewhere!
GRADE LEVEL - ES, MS, HS

1D) THE 3.6 BILLION YEAR GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
     Jim Miller, Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Geological Science, University of Minnesota Duluth,
The rocks of southern Minnesota preserve a geological record of Earth history that spans more than 3.6 billion years – more that 80% of geological time.  This course will present an overview of this ancient geological history and focus on the rocks that tell this story.  Participants will be given a suite of rock samples represent the major geological events that culminated in the creation of the southern part of our stat.
GRADE LEVEL – MS (HS)

SESSION 2

2A) MINERAL AND ROCK IDENTIFICATION
      Andrea Reed, Mineral Resource Geologist, MN Dept. of Natural Resources
In this largely discussion- and hands-on-based course, attendees will be introduced to mineral and rock identification at a level appropriate for elementary and middle school students. The course will cover mineral characteristics and properties, basic mineral and rock classification categories, and the rock cycle.  It will also provide worksheets and flow charts that can be used as a classroom aid for mineral and rock identification as well as links to educational rock and mineral resources.
GRADE LEVEL - ES, MS

2B) THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF GEOLOGICALLY PROTECTED AQUIFERS
     Bruce Olsen, Hydrogeologist, MN Geological Survey/MN Department of Heath (retired)
The area along the Minnesota River Valley from Shakopee to Mankato exhibits a variety of subsurface hydrogeologic conditions that provide excellent examples of the groundwater management and protection issues relating to geologically protected aquifers.  Many people think that there are no impacts that people have on a “protected” aquifer or that water quality in a deeper aquifer is of any concern to human health.  This course is intended to be 75% hands on classroom demonstration with a minimal amount of time spent with lecture.  Participants may take home a set of the classroom activities that have been prepared to demonstrate the groundwater management and public health issues related to geologically protected aquifers.
Classroom size is limited to 16 attendees.
GRADE LEVEL – (ES), MS, (HS)

2C) FLOOD PROTECTION
     Paul Eickenberg, Principal Engineer/Geologist, Braun Intertec Corporation
Communities, their citizens, and the environments they live in are at risk seasonally or under event-specific circumstances where exposed to flood hazards. The risk can be natural, associated with seasonal flooding of major rivers or event-based storm water discharge into local drainage ways. The risk can also be manufactured, associated with the release of water or sludge from a stock pond or tailings dam. Water is the most critical variable in a flood hazard evaluation. Water affects material strength and generates large and destabilizing forces on the structures built to protect communities from the risk; its flow through and/or below flood protection structures is complex and difficult to model. Flood protection structures must also be operated and maintained. This session will explore the elements impacting flood hazard evaluation, flood protection structure design and construction, and the regulations governing design and construction. Case studies will include flood protection projects in the Fargo-Moorhead area, a MCES wastewater treatment plant project in the Twin Cities metro area, and Unimin’s sand and gravel facility in Ottawa, Minnesota.
GRADE LEVEL - HS

2D) THE LONG GLACIAL HISTORY OF SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
     Carrie Jennings, Geologist, MN Dept. of Natural Resources
Did you know that there have been glaciations off and on in Minnesota for the last 2 ½ million years? And that there were way more than four events?  What happened to the Kansan and Nebraskan?  Have these questions answered and get up to speed on the incredible record of continental glaciation that is preserved in your back yard.  The last time around (during what we now call Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2-4 aka the Wisconsinan), Minnesota lay at the southern margin of the Laurentide ice sheet and was affected by dynamic ice lobes from multiple ice catchment areas.  But these MIS 2 deposits are underlain by similar units from Middle and possibly Early Pleistocene time. The total thickness of glacial sediment commonly exceeds 100 m.  The entire, preserved glacial section is well exposed along the Minnesota River valley and its tributaries as a result of the incision of glacial River Warren by discharge from glacial Lake Agassiz 13,400 years before present (BP) (11,500 radiocarbon BP.  Recent Minnesota Geological Survey mapping projects in Blue Earth, Sibley and Nicollet Counties have placed these units into the context of a recently formalized regional stratigraphy.  Take a virtual tour of the places where these units are exposed and learn where you can take your students for easy access to this long history of continental glaciation.
GRADE LEVEL - MS, HS

SESSION 3

3A) SUSTAINABILITY OF MINERAL RESOURCES
     Jim Miller,
Assoc. Professor, University of Minnesota Duluth
The environmental buzzword of the new millennium is sustainability.  “Sustainable Development” according to the 1984 United Nations Convention is defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”.  When it comes to mineral resources, which are by their nature finite and non-renewable, how can we develop such resources sustainably?   This class considers this seeming contradiction and explores how sustainability of earth resources can be maintained through promoting recycling and reuse and through advocating the discovery of new resources.
GRADE LEVEL - MS, HS

3B) A “RECIPE” FOR ASPHALT: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE ENGINEERING AND GEOLOGY OF PAVING AND MATERIALS
     Christina Morrison, Tiller Corp.
Ever wondered what asphalt tastes like? If you make it right, it tastes like chocolate and peanut butter! This course introduces the engineering and geology of paving and materials to fourth through seventh grade students. Through a hands-on activity, students will gain an understanding of the “recipe” for how asphalt is made and road construction techniques used in paving. Discussion will include the geology of the materials used in the production of asphalt and where those materials are mined in Minnesota.
Each participant will receive their own asphalt core to keep on display in the classroom which provides a cross-sectional view of the asphalt portion of a road.
GRADE LEVEL – ES, MS  

3C) ORIGIN OF MN IRON ORES
     Dick Ojakangas, Emeritus Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Minnesota Duluth
Worldwide, there are two main types of iron-formation (defined as a rock unit containing >15% Fe), and both occur right here in Minnesota!
The Algoma-type is closely related to marine volcanism and is more than 2,500 million years old (Archean).  It is called banded iron formation  (BIF) because it is thinly laminated, with  alternating laminae of red chert (silica) and iron oxide (hematite or magnetite) precipitated on the seafloor from hydrothermal waters. Removal of the silica laminae by alkaline hydrothermal waters resulted in iron ore with 65% Fe. This can be best seen at the Soudan Underground Mine State Park. 
Lake Superior-type iron-formations, first mined and studied (obviously!) in the Lake Superior region, are found around the world. In Minnesota, this type includes the large and active Mesabi Iron Range and the smaller (now closed) Cuyuna Iron Range. The active Marquette Range in Michigan, the inactive Gogebic Range of Michigan/Wisconsin, and the never-mined Gunflint Range of Ontario/Minnesota are also Lake Superior-type. The original iron-formation was deposited about 1,850 million years ago as sediments in shallow, near-shore, tidally influenced waters of the broad Animikie marine basin. These sediments contained 20 – 30 % Fe and 70 – 80% silica; alteration after burial and lithification transformed it into the rock called taconite, much of it containing the magnetic mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). Where the silica was removed by alkaline waters moving through broken rock along fault zones, the insoluble Fe was left behind as hematite (Fe2O3) deposits with 55 % Fe.  These high-grade deposits were mined from their discovery in 1892 until exhaustion in the late 1950s.  Hundreds of mines were developed and were instrumental in making the United States an industrial giant and in the winning of WWI and WWII. The taconite process, developed in 1956, involves the crushing of taconite, the removal of magnetite by strong magnets and forming the finely-ground magnetite into pellets for shipping.
GRADE LEVELS - MS, HS

3D) PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF INDUSTRIAL SAND
      Sara Welna and Stephanie Theriault, Barr Engineering
The Minnesota and Mississippi River Valleys play host to numerous sand deposits; however, not all sand deposits meet the requirements for use in industrial applications, including proppant in hydraulic fracturing by the oil and natural gas industry. Certain physical properties, such as grain size, shape, distribution, and mineralogy, make a sand deposit more or less desirable for use as a proppant. These physical properties are dictated by the geologic environment in which the sand was deposited and are observable in the field when conducting a geologic assessment of the deposit. This course will focus on the geologic history of sand deposits in the Minnesota River Valley, how sand is processed in an industrial facility, and will include a hands-on session to evaluate some of the physical properties of sand deposits that are conducted in a laboratory.
GRADE LEVEL – MS, HS

SESSION 4

4A) MINERAL RESOURCE: OCCURRENCES AND USES
     Ken Reid, Emeritus Professor, Mineral Resources Research Center, University of Minnesota
The fact that every material thing we take for granted in life is either made from minerals or depends on minerals for its production and/or transportation is not commonly recognized or understood. Examples of common everyday items will be traced back to their mineral source to show how modern civilization is totally dependent on mining. Materials available from The SME Minerals Education Coalition (www.mineralseducationcoalition.org) and Caterpillar Inc (www.cat.com) will be discussed and portions of DVDs and CDs covering documentaries and class demonstration projects will be discussed and shown, time permitting.
GRADE LEVEL - ES, MS, HS

4B) CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES OF SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
     Steve Bjerke, Oldcastle Aggregates
(This short course is part of an aggregate track and will complement the previous aggregate course on asphalt)
How do you make a road? Become familiar with materials needed in the construction aggregate industry. This course will include an overview of the construction industries aggregate needs for grading, base, concrete and hot mix asphalt production. The discussion will have an emphasis on how local resources such as quartzite, limestone and natural sands and gravels are produced and incorporated in construction projects to meet physical and volumetric quality requirements.
GRADE LEVEL – ES, (MS), HS

4C) SOUDAN MINE STATE PARK, GEOLOGY AND SO MUCH MORE!
     Scott Alexander, Research Scientist, Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota
While the Soudan Underground Mine offers a peek into the mining history of Minnesota it also provides a unique access to the deep subsurface for geologists, physicists, hydrologists, and microbiologists.  The deep subsurface is alive with microbiology that thrives is waters three times saltier than seawater.  This talk will explore the research, beyond the fundamental physics experiments, that is on-going at this deep research site.  Topics include early evolution of the Earth and its atmosphere, development of life on our planet and the potential for life on other planets.
  GRADE LEVEL - MS, HS

4D)  HOW SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENT POLUTION AFFECTS RIVERS AND LAKES
     Patrick Baskfield
, MN Pollution Control Agency, Hydrologist
Have you ever seen live plankton?  Have you ever seen a really bad algae bloom and wondered why it smelled so bad.  Have you ever wondered how and what pollutants affect our lakes the most?  Have you ever wondered how long it takes to clean up a lake after it becomes polluted?  This presentation is designed to give kids of all ages an understanding of how excess sediment and nutrient pollution affects our rivers, streams, and lakes. Major sources of nitrogen and phosphorus and sediment are discussed along with typical delivery pathways to surface waters.   This presentation informs and shows the viewer of the benefits of nutrients and sediment to our aquatic environments when present at the appropriate levels and the consequences excess levels can have on these same systems.  This is a very “sensory,” hands on, interactive presentation that kids really love
GRADE LEVEL - (MS), HS


FIELD TRIPS

 The focus of the 2016 MMEW field trips will be on the geology of south central Minnesota from its 3.6 billion year old basement rocks to post-Quaternary evolution of the glacial river Warren into the resource-rich Minnesota River Valley we see today. Over the course of 48 hours (Tuesday evening through Thursday afternoon) attendees will be introduced to the major rock types and geologic resources found in the central Minnesota River Valley from the Precambrian Morton gneiss, basalts and Sioux quartzite to the Paleozoic dolostones and sandstones of the Hollandale embayment before concluding with tropical heat and glacial ice recorded in the Cretaceous saprolites and Wisconsin era tills. Attendees will visit southern Minnesota’s highest waterfall, ancient islands and terraces in the river Warren amidst the oxbow lakes and meanders of the modern Minnesota River flood plain before exploring how creation of this trough rejuvenated the tributary streams now carving their way down to the new base level. We will see geological resources well as local landmarks spared from resource extraction by public intervention for preservation. Field trip stops will range from Redwood Falls and Jeffers in the West, Mankato in the South, Kasota in the East and Henderson in the North.

TUESDAY EVENING EVENT

Tuesday evening we will be offering an organized outing to Minneopa State Park approximately 25 miles from Gustavus College. Transportation via school bus to Minneopa is free and will depart Gustavus at 6pm. We will eat a picnic dinner (provided) and then hear a presentation by Carrie Jennings about the Minnesota River Valley, its genesis, tributary response, ravine issues, and the directional change in the river in this region. After a short hike we will return back to Gustavus College (approximately 9-9:30pm).

MEALS

Breakfasts and lunches are provided on Tuesday June 21, Wednesday, June 22 and Thursday, June 23.  Breakfasts will be eaten in the Gustavus Dining Hall. Tuesday June 21, lunch will be provided at Gustavus Dining Hall, Wednesday and Thursday bag lunches will be provided during the field trips. A picnic dinner will be provided to the attendees of the optional Tuesday evening trip to Minneopa State Park. Wednesday dinner is on your own.  Refreshments and beverages will be provided on Tuesday during the short courses. You are encouraged to bring your own water bottle to reduce waste. Please contact Hannah Friedrich if you have any specific dietary requirements.

LODGING

Gustavus College Residence - Southwest Hall

Each person will be assigned their own room.  Each room has two single beds and has air conditioning. Each room is provided with two sheets, pillows, pillowcases, one towel and one washcloth.  Restroom facilities are communal-style shared baths. If you wish to share the room notify Hannah Friedrich (hannah.friedrich@state.mn.us) of your roommate.

Local Motel Options

AmericInn Motel & Suites

700 North Minnesota
St. Peter MN 56082
507-931-6554
507-931-2396 (fax)
americinn.com/hotels/mn/stpeter

Konsbruck Hotel

Mary Svendsen, Owner
408 S. Third St.
St. Peter MN 56082
507-934-3314
konsbruckhotel.com

St. Peter Motel

221 Union St.
St. Peter MN 56082
507-931-3100
saintpetermotel.com

Viking Jr. Motel

216 W. Martin St.
St. Peter MN 56082
507-931-3081
vikingjrmotel.com

Camping

Electric and non-electric sites are available at the Riverside Municpal Campground. http://www.saintpetermn.gov/camping. There are numerous other campgrounds in neighboring towns.

PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATE

At the end of the workshop, all participants will be given a certificate acknowledging their participation.  The number of contact hours will be listed as 24 for full participation in the short courses and two days of field trips. 

Unfortunately, graduate credit will not be able to be offered again this year.

REGISTRATION

This year, registration for the MMEW will be managed through the Eventbrite on-line registration portal. To register, simply click on tab below and select the paid and free ticketed events for which you wish to particpate.

The workshop ticketed events include:

  • Meeting registration of $40/participant ($55 after June 6)
  • dormitory room for 1, 2, or 3 nights
  • Tuesday picnic and tour (free to registants and children; $10 for adult guests)

The meeting registration fee includes:

  • workshop program and field guidebook
  • teacher resource materials including digital resources, rock and mineral samples, handlenses, and more!
  • bus transportation for field trips and Tuesday evening tour
  • 3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, and Tuesday picnic dinner

The Eventbrite site requires payment by credit card. Cancellations and refunds will be allowed up to June 8th.

SHORT COURSE SELECTIONS

Registrants are asked to make their primary and secondary selection of short courses they wish to participate in for each of the four session. To do this:

1) Download the short course selection form (in either Word or pdf format),

2) Fill in your personal information and select your first and second course for each time session.

3) Submit your selection form by email to Hannah Friedrich - hannah.friedrich@state.mn.us; write "MMEW Course Selections" in the subject line.

SPONSORS

The reason that the registration costs for this workshop can be held so low is because of the generous contributions by minerals-related industries, professional associations, and individuals to the Minnesota Center for Minerals Resource Education, which oversees the operation of the MMEW.   Contributors to the 2016 workshop as of February 2016* include:

General Waste & Recycling
Polymet Mining
Krech Ojard & Associates
Global Minerals Engineering, LLC
W.P. & R. S. Mars Co.
Conveyor Belt Service
Rendrag, Inc
Kennecott Exploration Company
Marine Tech
GPM, Inc.
Minnesota Power Foundation
ArcelorMittal USA, Inc
Lind Industrial Supply
Martin Marietta Materials
The Saint Paul Foundation

*A more complete list of contributors will be distributed at the workshop.

In addition to financial support, many governmental agencies, academic institutions, and companies allow their staffs to contribute time to the planning and production of the workshop and often cover their expenses.  These include:

Finally, we want to thank the private companies and public organizations are providing tours of their facilities for the field trips. These include:


VOLUNTEERS

Since its inception in 1997, the MMEW has relied upon individual geoscientists from academia, industry and government to volunteer their time and expertise to what we all believe is an important and valuable endeavor.   Listed below are the volunteers who are contributing to this year’s MMEW and the roles they have played.

Name  Affiliation Committee
Hannah Freidrich MN Department of Natural Resources CoChair, Workshop Planning, Registration
Dean Moosavi Gustavus Adolphus College CoChair, Meeting & Field Trip Logistics
Cheryl Sill MN Earth Science Teachers Assoc. Teacher Resources
Scott Alexander University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Instructor
Jim Miller University of Minnesota Duluth (retired) Instructor
Kevin Hanson MN Department of Natural Resources Instructor
Carrie Jennings MN Department of Natural Resources Instructor
Paul Eickenberg Braun Intertec Corp Instructor
Steve Bjerke Oldcastle Aggregates Instructor
Andrea Reed MN Department of Natural Resources Instructor
Bruce Olson MN Department of Health (retired) Instructor
Christian Schardt University of Minnesota Duluth Instructor
Sara Welna Barr Engineering Instructor
Stephanie Theriault Barr Engineering Instructor
Patrick Baskfield MN Pollution Control Agenchy Instructor
Ken Reid University of Minnesota - Twin Cities (retired) Instructor


QUESTIONS?

Hannah Friedrich (651-259-5953), hannah.friedrich@state.mn.us

Dean Moosavi (507-304-3153), smoosavi@charter.net

Gustavus Adophus CAMPUS MAP <click here to download pdf of campus map>
GAmap1

GAmap2

 



  Minnesota Center for Mineral Resource Education
501C3