MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM

 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

 

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DULUTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIELD MANUAL

http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/field.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 2010

 

 

 

     

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

Kathy Heltzer                                     218-726-8935                               kheltzer@d.umn.edu

Director of Field

 

 

See updated information on our web site for other field faculty contact numbers/e-mails.

http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/field.html

Department of Social Work Phone Number is 218-726-7245 or 1-888-534-9734

FAX number is 218-726-7025. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

I.      Department of Social Work Mission, Goals and Objectives................. 3

iI.    Field Program mission.................................................................................................... 4

iii.   descriptions of field i and field ii.......................................................................... 5

A.    What is Field I about?............................................................................................................. 5

B.    What is Field II about?............................................................................................................ 5

iv.   field i objectives................................................................................................................ 5

V.     FIELD II Objectives.............................................................................................................. 6

VI.   PRE-REQUISITES...................................................................................................................... 7

VII. CONCURRENT PLACEMENTS............................................................................................... 7

VIII. BLOCK PLACEMENTS............................................................................................................ 7

IX.   FIELD PLACEMENT POLICIES............................................................................................... 7

A.    Agency Affiliation................................................................................................................. 7

B.    Process..................................................................................................................................... 8

C.    Criteria for Selection of Agencies....................................................................................... 8

D.    Criteria for Selection of the Agency Supervisors............................................................. 9

E.    Ongoing Agency Responsibilities....................................................................................... 12

F.    Agency Terminations........................................................................................................... 13

G.    Student Responsibilities...................................................................................................... 13

H.    Insurance............................................................................................................................... 14

I.    Hours....................................................................................................................................... 14

J.    Compensatory Time................................................................................................................ 14

K.    Field Days.............................................................................................................................. 14

L.    Holidays/Other Days Off.................................................................................................... 14

M.    Absences................................................................................................................................ 15

N.    Transportation..................................................................................................................... 15

O.    Seminars................................................................................................................................. 15

P.    Periods in Field...................................................................................................................... 15

Q.    Duration of Placement........................................................................................................ 15

R.    Credit for Hours Worked.................................................................................................... 15

S.    Repeating Placements.......................................................................................................... 15

T.    Using Employment for Field Placement........................................................................... 16

U.    Students with Handicaps..................................................................................................... 16

V.     Using an Outside MSW-Supervisor..................................................................................... 16

W.    Child Welfare Scholar Placement Requirements......................................................... 16

X.    No Field Credit for Previous Work Experience............................................................... 18

Y.     Application of Kolb Learning Style Theory................................................................... 18

Z.    Four Step Teaching Process Model................................................................................... 18

AA. International Field Placements........................................................................................ 19

X.     DIRECTOR OF FIELD/FACULTY LIAISON RESPONSIBILITIES.................................. 19

A.    Director of Field:................................................................................................................. 19

B.    Faculty Liaison:.................................................................................................................... 20

XI.   FIELD PLACEMENT PROCEDURES.................................................................................... 20

A.    Background Checks............................................................................................................ 20

B.    First Year Placements......................................................................................................... 21

C.    Second Year Placements..................................................................................................... 21

D.    Early Termination of Placement....................................................................................... 21

E.    Requests for Approval for Using Employment as Field.................................................. 22

F.    Requests for Approval for Using an Outside MSW-Supervisor..................................... 22

G.    Questions Which Students Should be Prepared to Answer When They Interview with the Field Agency Supervisors  23

XII.   THE LEARNING CONTRACT.............................................................................................. 23

A.    Purpose.................................................................................................................................. 23

B.    Field Guidelines Explained................................................................................................ 23

C.    How to Develop a Learning Contract............................................................................... 24

D.    First Year Learning Contract Guidelines....................................................................... 25

E.    Second Year Learning Contract Guidelines.................................................................... 33

A.  Evaluation of Student Performance.................................................................................... 41

B.  Studentís Evaluation of the Agency.................................................................................... 41

C.  Summer Field Placement Evaluations.................................................................................. 42

D.  Calendar for Student Evaluations...................................................................................... 42

XIV. Grading Procedures for Field................................................................................. 44

APPENDIX A:   Agency Application...................................................................................... 46

APPENDIX B:   Agency Contract......................................................................................... 52

APPENDIX C:   Student Evaluation.................................................................................... 56

APPENDIX D:   Student Evaluation of Field/Agency................................................ 68

APPENDIX E:  Background check forms....................................................................... 74

APPENDIX E:  CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards..... 78


UMD SOCIAL WORK FIELD MANUAL

I.      Department of Social Work Mission, Goals and Objectives

The mission of the Department of Social Work at the University of Minnesota Duluth is:

1)    To promote the well-being of all individuals, families, groups and communities and

2)    To advance social justice through teaching, research, and service.

The Department provides student-centered graduate social work education to prepare advanced practitioners for northern Minnesota and beyond.  Priorities of the Department include preparing culturally competent advanced generalist social workers, emphasizing services with American Indians and their communities, services to children and families, and social work education for practice in rural settings.

The Goals of the Social Work Department are:
  1. To develop highly skilled, culturally competent advanced generalist social workers who actively seek to promote social justice and human well-being.
  2. To contribute to social work knowledge development and effective social service delivery through research conducted with diverse populations.
  3. To provide service and outreach based on high ethical standards, to diverse communities on the local, regional, national, and international levels.
  4. To promote American Indian family and community preservation as part of a larger overall effort to reduce discrimination in society.
  5. To provide teaching, research, and service to increase the effectiveness of rural social work practice.
  6. To promote the well-being of children and families through curriculum content, research, student support, and outreach to the community.
The Program Objectives of the Social Work Department are:
  1. Apply critical thinking skills and a systematic problem solving approach within professional context, including synthesizing and applying appropriate theories and knowledge to practice interventions.
  2. Practice within the values and ethics of the social work profession and with an understanding of, and respect for, the positive value of diversity with an emphasis on American Indian families and communities.
  3. Demonstrate the professional use of self through opportunities for reflection and feedback in the identification, development and evaluation of a personal practice model.
  4. Describe the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and the strategies and skills of change that advance social and economic justice.
  5. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the history and evolution of the social work profession and its current structures and issues.
  6. Apply the knowledge and skills of an advanced generalist social work perspective to practice organized around direct service, organizational and community systems levels.
  7. Apply the knowledge and skills of an advanced generalist social work with an emphasis on practice with American Indian and rural communities and with children and families.
  8. Critically analyze and apply knowledge of biopsychosocial variables that affect individual development and behavior, and use theoretical frameworks to understand the interactions among individuals and between individual and social systems (i.e., families, groups, organization, communities, society, culture and global systems).
  9. Advance analysis of social policies affecting American Indian communities and demonstrate skills for influencing policy formulation and change.
  10. Evaluate relevant research studies and apply findings to practice, and knowledge dissemination.
  11. Conduct empirical evaluations of their own practice interventions and those of other relevant systems.
  12. Demonstrate cultural competence with a variety of client populations, colleagues, and members of the community.
  13. Use and provide supervision and consultation appropriate to advanced generalist practice.
  14. Function within the structure of organizations and delivery system change.

 

iI.    Field Program mission

Based on general systems theory and the understanding of the person-in-environment, the general program goal is to graduate students with advanced knowledge and skills in strengthening individuals, groups and families, and organizations and communities, through interventions at the direct service, administration and community levels.  Furthermore, graduates will have acquired skills to move into positions of leadership, both within the profession, as well as in the community.  To accomplish this goal, an integrated sequence of courses has been developed to meet the needs of the students.

Effective helping at any system level requires a combination of approaches.  The effective helping process requires that students have a broad base of knowledge in psychological, social, economic, political and societal problems and the skills to solve them.

Graduates will have developed self-awareness, as well as have acquired an ďadvanced generalistĒ base of knowledge and skills.  Accordingly, students are prepared to work in a variety of social and health settings, and at a variety of levels of system intervention.  Working with American Indians receives a special emphasis in the program.

iii.   descriptions of field i and field ii

A.  What is Field I about?

Field I is the equivalent of the Field experience that the BSW students received.  The focus is on generalist social work at the direct practice, organizational and community level.  This year is also referred to as the foundation year.  The learning experiences and content are operationalized in the studentís learning contract. They must prepare the student for the concentration year by including the core interviewing skills and the development and application of the problem-solving model, within the context of systems theory.  Case management and individual/family advocacy are appropriate assignments, as well as work on agency committees and community organizing projects.

B.  What is Field II about?

Field II is designed to help students develop the knowledge and skills needed for effective advanced generalist practice.  Accordingly, the seminar is focused on integrating classroom theories and intervention methodologies with applied agency practice at the micro and macro levels of the advanced generalist model.

 

iv.   field i objectives

1.  Integrate within a social work practice setting the theories and principles of generalist practice learned in the classroom, including the ecological-systems perspective, the strengths perspective, and multi-level intervention and the use of eclectic theory.

2.  Effectively utilize a problem –solving process within a generalist practice framework, including the steps of engagement, data collection assessment, planning, intervention, termination and follow-up.

3.  Examine social work values and ethics in a critical manner and to apply them in a professional setting and tolerate ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts.

4.  Demonstrate knowledge and skills for working with diverse populations, especially with American Indian people (i.e. ethnic, racial, cultural, spiritual, sexual orientation, socioeconomic and gender diversity).

5.  Effectively practice within an organizational structure by developing a working knowledge of the mission, policies, procedures and structure of the agency, effectively using supervision and consultation, and attending to professional social work roles and boundaries.

6.  Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to appropriately use health and social service resources available in the community, including scientific and technological developments relevant to the field setting.

7.  Utilize effective interpersonal skills in relating to clients and colleagues, including the ability to receive and provide feedback.

8.  Demonstrate a beginning understanding regarding the impact of social policy issues and promote changes to improve the quality of social services.

9.  Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly by engaging in career long learning.

 

V.     FIELD II Objectives

In order to satisfactorily complete Field II, students must demonstrate the following practice behaviors in relationship to Advanced Generalist Practice.

1.     Take independent initiative to negotiate, mediate, and advocate with client clients.

 

2.     Engage in self-reflection, self-monitoring and self-correction with particular attention to issues of diversity.

 

3.     Assume appropriate professional roles and maintain appropriate boundaries with particular attention to diverse populations

 

4.     Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication in challenging and difficult situations

 

5.     Develop a plan for post-MSW, career-long learning and ways to contribute to the professional knowledge base

 

6.     Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice

 

7.     Autonomously apply models of assessment, prevention, intervention and evaluation

 

8.      Demonstrate clear and concise oral and written communication

 

9.      Seek out situations beyond oneís comfort zone in an attempt to broaden cultural understanding and professional competence.

 

10.   Plan for ongoing professional development of cultural competence both in oneís practice and      

within agency and community settings.

 

11.   Actively participate in a variety of community activities and events to promote social and

economic justice

 

12.   Systematically collect, analyze and report information that can inform relevant practice

decisions

 

13.   Apply policy practice skills to advanced generalist practice

 

14.   Apply scientific and technological knowledge to effectively serve clients

 

15.   Provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes in service delivery and practice to  improve the quality of social services

 

16.   Demonstrate empathy and other interpersonal skills in advanced generalist practice

 

17.   Utilize a problem-solving model to autonomously collect, organize, and interpret client

 data, assess strengths and limitations, develop mutually agreed upon outcomes, goals and

 objectives, implement appropriate prevention and interventions strategies, facilitate

 transitions and endings and critically analyze, monitor and evaluate interventions in order

 to help diverse clients to resolve problems and enhance client capacities.

      18.  Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals in advanced generalist practice.

 

VI.   PRE-REQUISITES

8801 Field Placement I (3 cr/sem. or credit arranged; enrollment required for entire academic year or summer sessions; pre-req, admission to MSW program; co-reqs., SW 8111 & 8112) (S-N only).  Students may, with special practice faculty approval, complete SW 8111 and 8112 (our foundation practice methods courses) before enrolling in Field I.  At a minimum, this requires having had six months of paid social work related experience (so that they can adequately participate in SW8111 & 8112).

8802 Field Placement II (4cr/sem. or credit arranged; pre-reqs. admission to MSW program and completion of SW 8801; co-reqs. SW 8441, 8551, & 8661; enrollment required for entire academic year or summer sessions (S-N only).

VII. CONCURRENT PLACEMENTS

These placements span 16 hours per week over the course of the nine-month academic year.  A full classroom course load is carried by full-time students. 

 

VIII. BLOCK PLACEMENTS

Only the summer sessions can be used for block placements, which require twelve weeks of placement at forty hours per week.  All prerequisites apply.

 

IX.   FIELD PLACEMENT POLICIES

A.  Agency Affiliation

The Social Work Department seeks formal affiliations with public and private non-profit agencies whose policies and programs are consistent with the mission of the Social Work Department.

B.  Process

The potential placement agency's capability to provide the setting, experiences, supervision and instruction, is assessed and approved by the Field Staff using the following procedure:

  1. Identification of Potential Placement: Agency personnel, community persons, students and faculty may identify potential placements by contacting the Director of Field.
  2. Application:  Application materials are sent to identified agencies by the Director of Field    (Appendix A).
  3. Agency Review and Determination of Acceptance: The Director of Field reviews completed application materials and generally follows this with a telephone or face-to-face discussion with the agency applicant.  An important factor to assess is whether the agency can provide the appropriate resources and learning opportunities required by the Department.  A determination is made concerning the appropriateness of the learning experiences.
  4. Agency Confirmation and Agreement: If the evaluation is mutually satisfactory to the agency and the Director of Field, students may be referred to the agency for placement.
  5. Agency must sign an Affiliation Agreement with the University that covers a 5 year time period.
  6. Agencies are re-contacted annually to determine their interest in having field students for the next year.  Field staff evaluates the match between the agency and the program.

C.  Criteria for Selection of Agencies

Agencies are selected based on their ability to give a student the opportunity to gain practice experience through directed instruction and supervision in activities and settings reflective of the Field Guidelines for each level of the Field Program.  The following criteria are used to assess the agency's capability to provide appropriate field placements:

  1. Commitment to actively participate as a partner in professional education for the students.  This is a primary criterion and involves a commitment to service compatible with the values and ethics of social work.
  2. Acceptance of the basic goals of the Field program, and a readiness to invest time and effort in the educational process.  Cooperative planning is required by both the Field Staff and agency to facilitate the arrangements needed to enhance the student's learning.
  3. Ability to provide the MSW supervisory staff.  It is expected that workloads may be adjusted for such staff in order to assure adequate time to meet the learning needs of the students.  The agency considering a partnership with the Department should assess both its capability to assume the obligations involved and the advantages derived from the association.  A substantial investment of interest and staff time is essential.  The MSW Supervisor will function as the teacher/mentor.  The Supervisor also serves as the educational coordinator for the student, ensuring that all field experiences optimally contribute to the student's learning contract.  It must be understood that some students will require more than the minimum of one teaching hour per week.
  4. The agency should be able to assure the availability of an appropriate variety, quality and quantity of practice learning experiences with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  5. The agency will provide the physical facilities necessary to accommodate students.  When possible these include desk space, facilities for privacy in interviewing and instruction, resources for necessary travel, including home visits, and essential clerical services.  The Department expects agencies to provide an accessible environment for people with disabilities.
  6. Whenever possible, agencies are encouraged to provide educational stipends. 
  7. Agencies will meet the programís expectation that students will be given the opportunity to work with people of color, lesbian/gay/bi-sexual/transgender, other oppressed populations and rural communities.
  8. Agencies will annually fill out and submit a Field Placement Contract (Agreement to Placement form), which signifies their compliance with the requirements of the Field Program, for each student.

D.  Criteria for Selection of the Agency Supervisors

  1. Agency Supervisors will be expected to:

a.     Hold an MSW degree from an accredited program and have two years post-MSW experience.

b.     Have been employed at the agency for at least six months prior to becoming an Agency Supervisor for this program.

c.     Develop a clear learning contract with the student about performance expectations. 

The expectations are to be stated in terms of behavioral learning goals, methods of achievement, and standards of measurement.  The conceptualization of the learning

contract is shared between the Agency Supervisor and the student.  The Agency

Supervisor must inform the student about the activities possible to meet each of the goals

in the learning areas, as there is no way the student can know these ahead of time.  The students will write the contract.

d.     Provide instruction on a regular basis in an individual supervisory conference, at least one hour a week.  The Agency Supervisor must be willing to serve as the teacher/mentor and educational coordinator for the student and provide feedback to the student on an ongoing basis.

e.     Develop specific practice opportunities, which will enable the student to fulfill the expectations of the learning contract.  This includes arranging for specific learning activities that address issues of diversity.

f.      Communicate with the student and the Faculty Liaison about any unusual opportunities, conditions or problems as soon as they are evident.

g.     Participate with the student in the preparation of the student performance evaluations during the middle and final evaluation times.

h.     Participate in Field Program meetings regarding the program curriculum and/or effective field instruction.  All Field Supervisors are required to complete the Department of Social Work Field Supervisor Training program prior to being eligible to supervise an MSW student.

  1. The agency may provide MSW supervision through one of its MSW board members or through a community MSW not formally associated with the agency.  However, both require a written agreement explaining the roles and responsibilities of the MSW and of a specifically designated on-site agency supervisor.  The on-site supervisor serves as the studentís day-to-day mentor, teacher, and educational case manager.  They are expected to meet regularly (at least monthly) with the MSW to ensure that there is a close coordination between the studentís daily work and their MSW supervision/mentoring.  The student is primarily accountable to their MSW supervisor for completion of their learning contract and, in this role, the MSW may sometimes have to work with the on-site supervisor to ensure that the student is sufficiently focused on their contract learning objectives.  Both the MSW and the on-site supervisor are expected to attend, and actively participate in, the contract formulation and mid- and end-of-the-placement evaluations. [Note that the Department encourages, but does not require, the agency financially remunerating the outside MSW for their efforts.  Under no circumstances can the student be expected to pay for their supervision.]

For new applications, both the on-site and MSW supervisors must attend orientation sessions with the Field Faculty.

  1. This section clarifies the roles and responsibilities of Field Agency Supervisors in the UMD-MSW Field Program.

Definition of supervision (Maypole, 1997):

For the purposes of this paper, supervision is considered to have three components, which interact to achieve the goals of the agency and the UMD-MSW Field Program:

      to ensure the student's accountability to the agency and to the UMD-MSW Field Program

      to ensure the professional education of the student and

      to provide emotional support for the student's learning.

Supervisor administrative roles (accountability):

Although there are different ways in which field placement programs can be structured, the field agency/field program "contractual model" (Bogo and Globerman, 1995) is used at UMD.  This model entails close coordination between the Agency Supervisor and the Field Program's Faculty Liaison.

The Field Agency Supervisor is the administrative "linking pin" (Plunkett, 1983) between the agency and the UMD-MSW Field Program.  In this role, the Supervisor functions as the channel of communication between the two.

In addition, this role connotes "accountability" to both the agency and to the Field Program. This "accountability," however, may create both "role conflict" and "role ambiguity" for the Supervisor (Plunkett, 1983).  The former occurs when the agency and the UMD-MSW Field Program make competing demands in relation to administrative issues and the student's learning and the latter occurs when the demands of the agency and the Field Program are unclear.  Both the agency and the Field Program have a responsibility to avoid these problems.  However, it is expected that Supervisors will contact the Field staff to clear up conflicts and ambiguities expeditiously.

In working with the student, it is the Supervisor's responsibility to ensure that the student follows the policies and procedures of the agency and the Field Program.

Supervisor Educational Roles (teaching):

In addition to serving as the overall "educational coordinator" for the student's learning experiences in the agency and community, the supervisors are (1) coach/teacher (to actualize the student's learning contract to develop specific skills/competencies in the advanced generalist curriculum model), (2) judge/evaluator (to continually assess the student's progress toward the professional education goals), (3) advocate (to intervene in agency situations which are detrimental to the student's learning, e. g., harassment or role conflicts), (4) role model (to facilitate the student's learning), and (5) problem-solver (to assist the student in gaining critical thinking skills).

Emotional Support:

Graduate social work education is not easy.  Learning at all levels of practice are emotionally charged and frequently challenging.  The emotions created by the studentís being in new situations, which themselves are emotionally charged and frequently problematic, must be dealt with by the supervisor.  Unresolved emotions can impede further learning.  The studentís emotionally charged learning are dealt with in the field seminar, but must be dealt with on the spot by the supervisor.

These roles, of course, are conducted within an unequal power relationship with the student.  This requires the supervisor to be aware of this differential and its potential positive or negative impact on the student.  Different students come to the placements needing different levels of task assignments and monitoring.  Accordingly, there is no ďone size fits allĒ type of supervisory style.

 
 
Related Research:

Ellison, M L. 1994. Critical field instructor behaviors: Student and field instructor views.  Arete. 18 (2), 12-20.

In this study, MSW students and their supervisors reported on what behaviors contributed to and what behaviors detracted from quality field instruction.  The most frequently selected behaviors follow (p. 16):


Effective Supervisor Behaviors

 

 

Ineffective Supervisor Behaviors

 

*  Provides needed information

 

 

*  Inadequate supervisory contacts

*  Provides opportunity for student to express concerns

 

 

* Lack of needed information express   

concerns

*  Provides evaluative feedback

 

 

*  Poor role modeling

*  Validates student's feelings as normal 

 

 

*  Lack of monitoring of student's work/workload

*  Clarifies student's role with the student and others

 

 

*  Limits student's learning opportunities

*  Encourages student to examine and solve problems

 

 

These studies clearly describe the tasks and the expressive (emotional) dimensions of supervision.  Both must receive the supervisor's attention.  Other studies have shown that students are concerned about the quality of their relationship with the Supervisor.  Within the context of all the other sources of anxiety for the student in his/her graduate education processes, the positive relationship with the supervisor is considered to be a major facilitator of learning.

E.   Ongoing Agency Responsibilities

The agency is an important teaching/learning component of the Field Program.  The Agency Supervisors are expected to function as "educational coordinators."  It is expected that the Agency Supervisors will be actively supportive of social work, as a profession, and model social work values and ethics. Agencies are expected to:

  1. Annually submit the availability questionnaire for the next year.
  2. Ensure that opportunities are provided as appropriate for the Field I & II Learning Contract requirements, including diversity exposure.
  3. Relate to the student, as a student, and not as a paid employee.  There are definite differences between the two sets of role expectations.  For example, it would be inappropriate to assign students the "beeper" type of program emergency coverage responsibilities during non-work times.
  4. Assess the studentís developmental (knowledge and skills) levels and provide appropriate learning activities in their Learning Contract assignments.
  5. Responsibility for the studentís personal safety while in the field placement rests with the agency and the supervisor(s).  It is assumed that all human service agencies have policies and procedures to ensure the personal safety of the staff and other clients.  Risk assessment for working with particular clients is specifically the obligation of the Agency Supervisor.  It must be understood that many of the MSW students do not have sufficient experience or expertise to perform this risk assessment themselves.  Moreover, it must be understood that students may be reticent to admit to such a problem directly because they are concerned it might affect their evaluations.  If the student disagrees with an assignment, he/she will discuss it with the Agency Supervisor and the Faculty Liaison.
  6. Time should be provided to the Agency Supervisor to attend orientation and training meetings conducted by the Field Program staff.
  7. It is expected that the agencies will maintain the optimal environment for student learning.  Any form of harassment of the student, such as racial or sexual, will result in the Field Liaison requesting a meeting with the Agency Supervisor and the student. If the victimization continues, the placement will be terminated.  Students can not learn nor perform their jobs well in an environment of discrimination.
  8. Agencies will have appropriate MSW supervision for the students.
  9. Agencies will provide appropriate opportunities for students to work with diverse client populations.

F.   Agency Terminations

Each year, the field faculty will evaluate the appropriateness of agency participation (MSW, agency responsibilities, quality of supervision, 480 hours, provision of teaching model, provision of organizational and community activities in Field II, etc.).  A critical item, which will be evaluated each year, will be whether or not any of the students experienced personal safety problems.

Agencies experiencing difficulties in meeting these requirements at any time during the year will be contacted and problematic areas will be discussed.  The option will be provided to the agency staff for a meeting to discuss corrective actions, including termination of the agency in the program.

G.  Student Responsibilities

The students are expected to take the initiative in the assigned placement to actively seek the types of practice experiences which will enable them to develop and expand their professional skills.  It is expected that students will meet the following requirements:

1.   Adherence to the NASW Code of Ethics.  This is a critical area, which will be reviewed in the seminars.

2.   Adherence to the attendance policies for seminars and placements as established by the program.

3.   Discussion of learning needs and career plans with the Director of Field, who will suggest possible appropriate placement settings.  The students implement the "Field Placement Procedures".

4.   The development of a learning contract, in conjunction with the Agency Supervisor, which is submitted to the Faculty Liaison six weeks after placement begins (concurrent) or no more than two weeks for block. 

5.   The initiation and follow- through of all field responsibilities, as designated by the Agency Supervisor.  This includes regular and prompt attendance at supervisory meetings with the Agency Supervisor.

6.   Adequate recording to document the quality and effectiveness of the student's work.

7.   Demonstrate an understanding of the need for strict confidentiality of information gained during work hours.

8.   Recording of practice hours in the agency.

9.   The completion with the Agency Supervisor of all written evaluations to be submitted to the Department of Social Work.

10.  The notification of the Faculty Liaison of difficulties encountered which they are unable to resolve with the Agency Supervisor.

11.  Completion of the student evaluation of the agency.  Specific student tasks regarding development of the learning contract are described in the Learning Contract section.

H.  Insurance

1. Professional Liability

The University of Minnesota covers all students who are properly placed and supervised under its self-insurance program for purposes of professional liability (including "malpractice").  Students are not covered for tasks they agree to perform outside of or after they have received the grade for the 480 hours for Field II and 420 hours for Field I.  Students who are being paid for their field placement are not covered by the University.  Professional liability insurance can be purchased through the National Association of Social Workers for student members and non-members.

2.  Automobile Liability

Students are covered by the University's policies (if doing assigned field placement work) for a maximum of $200,000 liability on top of their own auto insurance.  However, agencies are expected to provide insurance coverage also for students' conducting assigned work in placement.  It is the students' responsibility to check this out before transporting any clients. All usual accident reporting procedures must be followed.

I.    Hours

Students are responsible for observing agency working hours.  A minimum of 480 hours of field experience per academic year (Field II) and 420 hours (Field I) is required by the University of Minnesota, Duluth in order to adequately meet the standards set by the Council of Social Work Education.  The agency should keep records to enable it to certify a specific number of practice hours for students at the end of each semester or summer session.

J.   Compensatory Time

Occasionally the student's field responsibilities may require work during non-regular hours.  This may be treated as overtime, for which compensatory time promptly will be given.  It may not be saved in order to shorten the semester/summer session or enable students to leave early for vacation.

K.  Field Days

Field days are assigned by the Department in conjunction with class schedules.  To allow for scheduling or classes, students must be free to attend classes on the days that are not assigned to the field.  Field days may be arranged by mutual agreement of agency and school only if they cause no conflict with class schedules or other school requirements.

L.   Holidays/Other Days Off

Students must work 480 hours for Field II and 420 hours for Field I in their placement.  They are allowed those holidays observed by the agency and also those observed by the University.  Students are not expected to work in their field placements during the final examination weeks nor during regularly scheduled academic breaks.

M. Absences

Students are expected to telephone the Agency Supervisor at the beginning of the field day to report illness or any other emergency requiring absence during the student's field time.  Absence, which exceeds two consecutive field days, should be reported by the Agency Supervisor to the Field Liaison.  It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements for the make up of missed time by the end of the grading period (i.e., semester or summer session).

N.  Transportation

Students are responsible for transportation to and from the agency.  However, unless prevented by law or agency policy, it is expected that the agency assume the expenses for all agency-delegated activities that include travel.  The Social Work Department does not reimburse students for field travel expenses.

O.  Seminars

For students in our Duluth-based program, there are 10 one-and-one half-hour seminars per semester.  Summer session field seminars are arranged between the Instructor and seminar students. Distance Education seminars will, whenever possible, be held near distance sites.

Students will stay in the same seminar group for the duration of the placement.  This is necessary for learning continuity purposes.

P.   Periods in Field

The school year placement at the UMD Department of Social Work is concurrent, i.e., students are enrolled in class and field education simultaneously.  Students requesting a block placement must complete the methods courses at the appropriate level prior to enrolling in field.

Q.  Duration of Placement

Concurrent placements are for the academic year, i.e., two consecutive semesters in one agency placement.  Student requests for change in placement once placement has begun will be considered only if there are irresolvable issues in the placement that inhibit the student's learning opportunities.  Block placements are for twelve consecutive weeks during summer terms only.

R.  Credit for Hours Worked

If the student withdraws from enrollment in the field course, no credit for hours completed will be applied to the next enrollment in field.

S.  Repeating Placements

Students are discouraged from completing their field placement in one agency setting/department for two year-long placements.  A special request must be made to the Director of Field outlining the rational for completing field requirements in the same agency twice, specifically explaining how Field II learning objectives will be achieved and what new learning opportunities will be available.  Students are encouraged to use different MSW supervisors for their Field I and Field II field placements.

T.   Using Employment for Field Placement

An employment setting may be used as a field placement if all the regular department requirements of agencies and Agency Supervisors are met in the setting and if, for the hours regarded as the field placement time, the student is assigned tasks and supervision different from his/her regular job.  Also, the field placement is an educational experience, which requires controlled, limited, and closely monitored assignments.  The employment situation creates different expectations and thus makes it difficult to safeguard the student's learning needs.  The student is in an agency to learn; and employee is in the agency to work.  Not all employment situations will be approved for field placement and approval depends on how clearly the student and agency can describe the learning opportunity and how it is to be monitored and evaluated by the Department.  A written application (as described in the procedure section) is required.

If the student has been employed in the agency six months or less, a Field Placement proposal (refer to the procedures section) can be filed to show that her/his regular duties meet the requirements for Field I or II. A different supervisor is required.  The other requirements above apply, including the written application.

U.  Students with Handicaps

Students with handicaps, which could adversely affect their performance in the placement, should so inform the Director of Field and Agency Supervisor.  Possible adaptations can be considered.

V.   Using an Outside MSW-Supervisor

Agencies must file written applications for approval to use outside MSW-supervisors.  (Refer to the procedure section.)

W.  Child Welfare Scholar Placement Requirements

Child Welfare Scholars must complete at least one field placement* either, 1) at a Minnesota county department of social services in a unit with a focus on child welfare or else 2) at an American Indian human service agency with a focus on strengthening families and preventing out-of-home placements of at-risk children.  For Non-Advanced Standing students, this placement must be completed for the Field I requirement.   Since Advanced Standing students are involved only in Field II, they must meet these IV-E requirements through Field II. 

Examples of the above primary IV-E placements are: Itasca County Health and Human Services, Bois Forte Human Services, Cass County Human Services, Carlton County Human Services, St. Louis County Social Services, Mille Lacs Reservation Health & Human Services, White Earth Tribal Services, Beltrami County Human Services, Lake County Social Services, Fond du Lac Human Services, and Leech Lake Social Services.

Non-advanced standing students may complete their Field II in a secondary child welfare agency.  This placement needs to involve working with children at risk for out-of-home placement.  This could include preventative social work where the child clientele are not necessarily currently at risk for placement. 

Possible examples of acceptable secondary IV-E placements include residential treatment facilities for children, elementary or secondary schools, and family service collaboratives.  Community mental health clinics and hospitals are also possible if the clear focus is on serving children either individually or through family or community work.  First preference is given to placement settings under contract by county agencies to provide IV-E services.

As previously indicated, standard program students must use Field I instead of Field II to satisfy their primary IV-E placement requirement (i.e., they must arrange to have their Field I placement at a county child welfare agency or American Indian child/family agency).  Exceptions to this rule need to be approved by the Director of Field in consultation with the Child Welfare Project Scholars Coordinator.

In order to ensure that their proposed placements qualify under IV-E, students must get this specifically approved by the Director of Field.

Child Welfare Scholars are required to also complete an "Addendum to Field Learning Contract" that includes the following:

1.     The field agency description should describe clearly the child welfare services provided by your unit and the agency

2.     An explicit statement that the student will be working with Title IV-E eligible foster care or pre-adoptive children in the field placement.

3.     Identification and assessment of child abuse and neglect:

a)     Discuss the risk assessment instruments (if any) used in your agency

b)    Discuss the process of risk assessment with appropriate workers, including discussion of risk factors, behavioral and emotional indicators of neglect, and cultural/racial issues considered in assessment.

4.     Knowledge of community: Describe and discuss with your Field Supervisor, the roles and responsibilities of the following in relation to child welfare/child protection in the community:

A. Your field agency

B.  Schools

C.  Law Enforcement

D.  Courts, prosecutors, agency attorneys

E.  Health Care System

F.  Specialized agencies, e.g. for sexual abuse, crisis nurseries, foster care, etc

5.     Learning contracts must explicitly demonstrate an understanding the student will be making a direct application of the knowledge and skills obtained from the field placement experience to their practice with children in their county social services job.

Additionally, students should consult the "Field Information for Child Welfare Scholars" link on the Department web site for specific activities which should be discussed with their Agency Supervisor as they draft their learning contracts.  This can be found at: 

http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/cwfieldinfo.html

* Those Child Welfare Scholars with 5 years of prior social work experience in a child welfare setting should consult the Child Welfare Scholars Coordinator for information regarding the waiving of this requirement.

X.  No Field Credit for Previous Work Experience

Under no circumstances may credit be given for prior work or volunteer experience.

Y.   Application of Kolb Learning Style Theory

We have found that field supervision is enhanced if supervisors and students are aware of their respective learning styles and ways they can design their supervisory interaction to complement each of their learning strengths. According to Kolb, all learning is composed of four components:

Kolb believes that people usually begin their learning about a particular task or problem with the component that represents their primary learning style.  For complete learning, they must move from their primary style through the other three types of learning.

The student's predominant learning styles must be accommodated to the extent that is practical.  For example, many students have concrete/active learning styles.  With these students, it is necessary to start at the experiencing, rather than abstract/conceptual level.  Initial discussions about theories would not meet the student's needs. 

Conversely, for some students, it would be appropriate to start at the abstract/conceptual level.  The Supervisor would then lead the student through each of the other steps to complete the full learning cycle. 

Written materials regarding Kolbs theories (including the actual Kolb Learning Style Inventories which supervisors and students can complete in about 10 minutes) are available by request from the Field Liaisons.

Z.   Four Step Teaching Process Model

Supervisors must assess the student's maturity, learning style and skill developmental levels.  This information is needed to assess where to start with the student in the UMD-MSW Field Program four-step teaching process model.  The information can be acquired from the students in interviews, in review of the student's resume or student profile, the Kolb Learning Styles Inventory and initial observations in the placement.  Then, the following model should be applied:

Preparatory assessment and training (orientation/workshops; information on agency policies and procedures and "how things are done;" introductions to staff).

Shadowing (Student observes the Supervisor and others doing tasks he/she will do; reflections/discussions with the Supervisor about the objective and subjective experiences).

Observation (Supervisor observes the student in assigned learning tasks, which could include videotaping and role playing, and provides information and feed- back; discussions on theories and meanings of objective and subjective learnings for practice; generalizations and conclusions made).

Semi-independent practice (Supervisor provides information and feedback on specific skills as needed by the student, continuation of reflecting and the relating to and construction of practice theories).

As it can be seen, a beginning-level student should not be assigned learning tasks at the 4th level.  The notion of "one size fits all" supervision is not appropriate for use with the students.  Generally, it is desired that the student will attain the skills to operate at the semi-independent practice level in various tasks, such as interviewing or community data-gathering, by the end of the school year.  Some students might come to the field placement with 3rd or 4th-level skills in some tasks, but be at the 1st or 2nd in other tasks.

AA. International Field Placements

Students may develop international placements, but all of the policies, procedures and learning expectations listed in the Field Manual must be met, without exception.

X.     DIRECTOR OF FIELD/FACULTY LIAISON RESPONSIBILITIES

A.  Director of Field:

The Director of Field is the general facilitator of the Field Program in the Department's curriculum.  This includes but is not limited to:

Developing the framework within which the program takes place

Maintaining the currency of the Field Manual and the policies and procedures relating to the Program

B.  Faculty Liaison:

Liaison Roles:

  1. Advisor: Provides assistance to students in career planning, which includes identification of learning needs and educational experiences designed to meet those needs.
  2. Monitor: Carries out on-going assessment of agency, Agency Supervisor and studentís learning experiences to ensure the student's learning objectives and school's expectations are met.
  3. Consultant: Assists Agency Supervisor in developing supervisory skills, techniques, and identification of learning styles; provides course outlines, other materials.
  4. Teacher: Assists students with integration of coursework and practicum and serves as role model to the students.  Provides the seminar.
  5. Mediator: Assists in resolving problems between student and Agency Supervisor or other agency personnel.
  6. Advocate: Provides relevant information when necessary to evaluate the student's field and academic performance and to determine the student's future educational experience.

Liaison Functions:

  1. Linkage: Interprets school policies, procedures, and expectations to agencies; assesses the fit between school curriculum and educational experiences provided by the agency.
  2. Evaluation: Evaluates students, Agency Supervisor and agency; recommends or assigns students' grades; makes recommendations for continued use of agency and Agency Supervisor.
  3. Administration: Ensures completion of placement forms and students' evaluations.

(Faria, Brownstein & Smith (1988) Model Adaptation)

XI.   FIELD PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

A.  Background Checks

Any student placed for academic credit in a UMD department in which there is direct contact with minors or other vulnerable populations must undergo a background check.  This includes all MSW students.   HireRight, Inc. must be used for students who are required by UMD to have background checks for their placements.  A HireRight background check is considered valid for two years from the calendar date that the background check was completed. (The background check does not need to be repeated if the student changes location of her/his placement.) The Department of Human Resources will facilitate these checks.

MSW students are responsible for completing the appropriate forms and providing them to the HR Department.  Forms are available on UMD Human Resources web site at http://www.d.umn.edu/umdhr/Policies/hiring/background/ 

B.  First Year Placements

During the spring or summer prior to their enrollment in the Department of Social Work, the student meets with the Director of Field to develop a placement plan based on the student's request, experience, interest, and faculty knowledge of placements.  The plan includes a recommended list of placements for each student.  Students are expected to select possible field sites which are different from their past work experiences. 

In preparation for this meeting, the student may decide to review the list of agencies that have indicated an interest in having students during the time (summer or academic year) when students want to do their placements.  They also may want to review the Field I - Placement Agencies Book that includes all agencies that have had our students over the past 5-6 years.

All students should complete the on-line Student Profile form at: http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/field.html   

Students schedule a personal interview with the Agency Supervisor. Students should plan to bring a resume with them to this interview.  [We usually recommend that students interview with at least 2-3 different agencies.]

If the student and Agency Supervisor mutually decide that the placement would be a good match, the student gives the Supervisor the Agreement to Placement Form (Agency Contract - Appendix B) to sign.  The student is responsible for seeing that this form is expeditiously returned to the Director of Field.

If the placement is not acceptable to either the Agency Supervisor or the student, an alternative placement will be worked out following the above procedures.

C.  Second Year Placements

In March, each first year student reviews the available information on agency placements supplied by the Director of Field, in the Placement Agencies Book (Field II), and on web. Students should complete the on-line Student Profile form at:  http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/field.html

Based on student requests and faculty knowledge of placements, a second year placement plan is developed with the Director of Field.

Students schedule and complete a personal interview with their proposed second year Agency Supervisor, who will confirm whether this placement is mutually acceptable through completing an Agency Agreement to Placement Form (Agency Contract - Appendix B).

This process should be completed by the end of the spring semester.

D.  Early Termination of Placement

It is expected that this procedure will be implemented only under special circumstances.

  1. Request by students:

a.   The Faculty Liaison must be informed immediately if an issue develops that potentially affects a studentís continued placement.

b.   Faculty Liaison may discuss the situation with the full Field Staff.

c.   Student/Agency Supervisor/Faculty Liaison discuss the problem/issue.

d.   If the issue is not resolved, students must submit a written request to the Faculty Liaison describing the reason for the request and the steps taken to resolve the issue.  It will be discussed by the full Field Staff.

e.   After review by the entire Field Staff which approves or disapproves the request, the decision will be communicated to the agency and the student and: (a) a new placement is developed for the student if the request is approved; or (b) efforts to resolve the problem will be continued with the Faculty Liaison, student and Agency Supervisor if the request is denied.

  1. Requests by Agency:

a.   The Faculty Liaison is notified by the agency if an issue develops that jeopardizes the student's continued placement.

b.   Student/Agency Supervisor/Faculty Liaison conference.  A specific behavioral plan will be mutually developed if all agree that the placement may continue for the present.  This plan will be evaluated in a specified time frame (1-3 weeks).

c.   Second student/Agency Supervisor/Faculty Liaison conference.  The plans in the previous conference will be evaluated.  If the student has met expectations, the placement will continue.  If not, alternative plans/expectations may be formulated or the placement may be terminated.

E.   Requests for Approval for Using Employment as Field

The student must submit in writing the rationale for approval at least four weeks prior to the beginning of the field instruction period for which the request is being made.  This request will be submitted to the Director of Field, using the following format:

  1. Reasons for request, delineating the specifics of the student's situation.
  2. Education Plan:

a.     Supervision: name and qualifications of supervisor.

b.     Agency's willingness to support, plan and sign a formal learning contract/plan with the student and the Field Program.

c.     Relationship between employment and education: description and relationship between planned learning experiences and student's regular work assignments.

d.     Descriptions of specific learning tasks to fulfill the Field I or Field II placement requirements (i.e., beginning direct service, organizational and community level tasks for Field I and more advanced direct service, organizational and community level tasks for Field II).  The inside back page of the Manual can be helpful in identifying appropriate tasks.

F.   Requests for Approval for Using an Outside MSW-Supervisor

In general, requests for approval for using an MSW not employed by the field placement agency will only be considered for Field II placements.  Field I placements should have on-site MSW supervision.  Under special circumstances, a variance to this policy may be granted.

  1. Reasons for request, delineating the specifics of the student's situation.
  2. Education Plan:

a.     Supervision: name and qualifications of supervisor(s).

b.     Agency's willingness to support, plan and sign a formal learning contract/plan with the student and the Field Program.

c.     Copy of the contract with the outside MSW supervisor explaining the coordination between the on-site and MSW supervisor.  This should provide for ongoing communication between the two parties, as well as for the on-site supervisor(s) attending the learning contact meeting and the mid-year and end-of-the-year student evaluation sessions.

G.  Questions Which Students Should be Prepared to Answer When They Interview with the Field Agency Supervisors

  1. What is your level and your past experiences in social work to date?
  2. What do you hope to get out of a field placement in this agency?
  3. What are your strengths and weaknesses in dealing with people?
  4. What type and field of social work job will you be seeking upon graduation?
  5. What type of supervision do you prefer?
  6. What are your time availability and constraints?
  7. What is your interest in the particular target groups served by this agency?
  8. What is your level of knowledge about the needs of certain vulnerable groups, such as   minorities, youngsters and women (i.e. what barriers do they face)?
  9. What is your ability to work both independently and in teams?

XII.   THE LEARNING CONTRACT

A.  Purpose

The major purpose of developing the Learning Contract is for guidance and accountability.  The development and completion of the contract provides a mechanism for planning, monitoring, and evaluating the student's field experience.

The contract should represent the end product of a process - a process that integrates the requirements of the Department of Social Work for certain learning goals to be accomplished in placement.  The contract is the formal agreement between the Department (represented by the Faculty Liaison), student and field agency that the student will fulfill the requirements of placement.

B.  Field Guidelines Explained

The field guidelines are derived from content in the practice courses.  They illustrate basic professional expectations the student must meet in the field and ways in which the Agency Supervisor can plan learning experiences so that the student can meet the expectations.  Each set of field guidelines has three parts.

Learning Areas: Content topics are major units of study included in the methods courses.

Goals: Reasonable expectations the student should meet during the course of the field placement.  The expectations are based on related classroom content.

Possible Learning Assignments: These are suggestions for developing learning assignments for the student to meet the expectations.  The Agency Supervisor and student should develop learning assignments which are reasonable to achieve in the field setting.  The possible learning assignments in this Manual provide suggestions of broad areas which can be covered in the assignments.  Learning assignments should include specific learning/teaching strategies, i.e., teaching interviewing by the supervisor modeling and then the student demonstrating the skill and the supervisor providing feedback. 

The assignments must be specific, measurable and tailored to the learning opportunities in the agency, possible to achieve in the specified time frame.

All of the possible field assignments listed in each set of field guidelines is considered to be reasonable and fair assignments to give to students at that level, although timing of assignments is an important consideration.

C.  How to Develop a Learning Contract

By following these steps, the student and Agency MSW Supervisor should be able to construct a Field Contract.  Review and input from the Faculty Liaison is required but they are not specified in these steps because they will occur at various times depending on the placement.

STEP I:      Orientation and Assessment: The Agency/MSW Supervisor and others should provide a complete orientation to the agency and discuss learning opportunities in the agency.

STEP II:     Student Learning Objectives: Careful exploration of the studentís interests and abilities, in conjunction with the MSW Programís learning objectives, is completed by the MSW Supervisor.

STEP III:    Time Allocation: The Agency MSW Supervisor estimates the allocation of the student's field time, appropriate to complete the objectives identified by the MSW program and the field agency.  Mutual agreement is reached pertaining to actual scheduled field hours and appropriate blocks of time that the student needs to spend in their field placement for each semester.  Summer field is done as a ďblock placementĒ and in this case special attention should be given to project/cases appropriate for a 12-week block field placement.

STEP IV:    Development of Learning Assignments:  Field I and Field II contracts each have prescribed learning objectives (see below).  Specific field activities that will facilitate the completion of each objective will be identified.  When appropriate, specific completion dates should be designated.  [Upon request, Liaisons will provide learning contracts of previous field students to serve as models.]

STEP V:     Planning of Evaluation:  Following each objective and learning assignment, specific evaluation procedures should be identified.  Such procedures might include review and evaluation by the Agency MSW Supervisor and other staff members from oral and written presentations made by the student.

STEP VI:    Learning Contract Review: The student, Field Supervisor(s), and Faculty Liaison should review the entire learning contract to be sure that it accurately reflects the requirements of the UMD MSW Field Program, as well as the placement agency.

STEP VII:  Completion of Contract: A final draft of the Learning Contract should be reviewed and signed off by the student, Agency MSW Supervisor and Faculty Liaison. Each should retain a copy.

D.  First Year Learning Contract Guidelines

Brief Program Description: The 1st year of the MSW program is designed to prepare the students to become generalist social work practitioners.  The focus of the 1st year field placement is on professional values and relationships, basic communication and interviewing theory and skills, the problem-solving process, social systems, planned interventions, evaluation and termination and the systematic use of community resources.

                      As previously noted, the possible Learning Assignments are merely general guidelines.  Tasks for a particular student must be specifically tailored to the learning opportunities of the placement agency and the studentís unique learning style.

 

Child Welfare Scholars are required to also complete an "Addendum to Field Learning Contract" that includes the following:

  1. The field agency description should describe clearly the child welfare services provided by your unit and the agency
  2. Describe clients who receive child welfare services from your agency.  What % of the clients on your caseload (or % of the agency's clients) are "IV-E eligible"? (You may need to discuss "IV-E eligibility" with your MSW supervisor or administrators of the agency in order to answer this item)
  3. Identification and assessment of child abuse and neglect:

a.     Discuss the risk assessment instruments (if any) used in your agency

b.     Discuss the process of risk assessment with appropriate workers, including discussion of risk factors, behavioral and emotional indicators of neglect, and cultural/racial issues considered in assessment.

4.     Knowledge of community: Describe, and discuss with your Field Supervisor, the roles and responsibilities of the following in relation to child welfare/child protection in the community.

A. Your field agency

B.  Schools

C.  Law Enforcement

D.  Courts, prosecutors, agency attorneys

E.  Health Care System

F.  Specialized agencies, e.g. for sexual abuse, crisis nurseries, foster care, etc

 

5.  Understand the impact of domestic violence on child welfare cases and strategies for

     responding effectively.  Complete at least 10 hours of domestic violence related activities

     to enhance this understanding from a list of opportunities provided to child welfare scholars

          (e.g., training, observation of court hearings, observing groups, touring community agencies).

 

Additionally, students should consult the "Field Information for Child Welfare Scholars" link on the Department web site for specific activities which should be discussed with their Agency Supervisor as they draft their Learning Contracts.  Link is at:  http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/cwfieldinfo.html

 

                     In developing their learning contracts, students must develop learning activities to address each major learning area and the practice behaviors that accompany them. The learning activities should be designed to allow the students opportunities to achieve and master the practice behaviors. Sample learning activities are provided below.

 

FIELD I:

1.     THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF GENERALIST PRACTICE

 

Practice Behaviors:

 

      Apply the ecological-systems perspective to case situations

      Apply the strengths perspective to case situations

      Apply a multi-level intervention to case situations

      Apply the eclectic use of theory to case situations

      Utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation

 


Sample Learning Activities:

1. Given a case assignment, the student can draw an eco-map of the relevant social systems and identify both strengths and problem areas.

2. Given a case assignment, the student can identify potential intervention strategies at the direct service, organizational and community levels of intervention.

3. Given a case assignment, the student will identify an intervention strategy based upon a major practice model and describe the rationale for the selection of the model as it relates to case factors.

Completion Date __________          

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

 

2.  USE OF THE PROBLEM-SOLVING MODEL AND STRENGTHS-BASED PERSPECTIVE

Practice Behaviors:

      Develop a mutually agreed-on focus of work and desired outcomes

      Assess client strengths and limitations

      Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives

      Select appropriate intervention strategies

      Help clients resolve problems

      Negotiate, mediate, and advocate for clients

      Facilitate transitions and endings

      Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions

      Collect, organize, and interpret client data in developing assessments

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will conduct an effective initial interview with a client system, which demonstrates relationship-building skills.

2. The student will collect relevant client data and demonstrate competency in agency data recording practices.

3. The student will develop case assessments that identify strengths, as well as problem areas, and which are useful for intervention planning.

4. Given a case assignment, the student will develop an intervention plan with the client system and present this plan to an interdisciplinary team or Agency Supervisor.

5. The student will facilitate the implementation of an intervention plan and evaluate its effectiveness with the client system.

6. The student will demonstrate skills for addressing termination with client systems and implement a plan for follow-up.

Completion Date __________    

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

3.     SOCIAL WORK VALUES AND ETHICS

Practice Behaviors:

 

      Tolerate ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts

      Apply social work values in a professional setting

 

      Make ethical decisions by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and, as applicable, of the International Federation of Social Workers/International Association of Schools of Social Work Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles

      Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will identify value-based factors that facilitate or inhibit problem-solving in a case situation.

2. The student will examine an ethical dilemma confronted and draw from the NASW Code of Ethics in the decision making process on a monthly basis.

3. The student will discuss ethical conflicts with their MSW field supervisor and demonstrate the ability to tolerate ambiguity in resolving them

Completion Date __________          

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

4.  DIVERSITY   (10% (48 hours) of the studentís field placement activities must focus on this area)

Practice Behaviors:

      Recognize the extent to which a cultureís structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power

      Gain sufficient self-awareness to minimize the influence of personal biases and      values in working with diverse groups

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will interview professionals within their placement agency and/or the community from diverse backgrounds regarding social work practice issues with diverse populations.

2. The student will work with diverse populations in their placement setting and discuss the implications for social work practice with their supervisor.

3. The student will make a site visit to at least one community agency/program that serves a diverse client base.

4. The student will discuss with their supervisor barriers to providing appropriate and culturally sensitive services to diverse populations in their placement agency.

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

5.      ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND PROCESSES

Practice Behaviors:

     Use supervision and consultation

      Effectively practice within an organizational structure

      Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals

      Demonstrate a working knowledge of the mission, policies, procedures and structure of the field agency

Sample Learning Activities:

1. Given the opportunity to review agency policy and procedure materials and to observe agency decision-making processes, the student will orally present a brief agency description paper to their Agency Supervisor or field seminar.

2. Come prepared to weekly MSW field supervision with relevant questions regarding social work roles and boundaries, as well as organizational structure issues.  Discuss reading material from MSW coursework related to professional social work roles, etc.

3. Interview agency administrators/policy-makers

4. Attend an agency Board meeting and/or other meetings where policy issues are discussed

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

6.     UTILIZING  COMMUNITY RESOURCES, INCLUDING SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS

Practice Behaviors:

      Advocate for client access to the services of social work

      Demonstrate the ability to appropriately use health and human services available in the community

      Identify scientific and technological developments relevant to provide effective services specific to the field placement setting and client population

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. Given a case assignment, the student will be able to identify appropriate community resources for their client(s) and will demonstrate the ability to make a referral and advocate, as needed.

2. The student will visit at least three other service providers/agencies in the community and gather information regarding what services are available, eligibility issues, etc.

3. The student will discuss with their MSW Supervisor the role of networking in terms of improving service delivery.

4. The student will use technology to identify best practices and evidence-based research relevant to their field placement

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

7.     INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

Practice Behaviors:

      Demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues

      Use empathy and other interpersonal skills

      Demonstrate the ability to provide and receive feedback

      Attend to professional social work roles and boundaries

Sample Learning Activities

1. Given a case assignment, the student will demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills while interviewing a client, under the supervision of their MSW Supervisor.

2. The student will participate in staff meetings and other appropriate forums within the agency during which time their supervisor will have the opportunity to observe the studentís interpersonal skills with colleagues.

3. Given a case assignment, the student will demonstrate the ability to establish rapport with a client in the implementation of a case plan, including providing appropriate feedback.

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

8.  SOCIAL POLICY ISSUES

Practice Behaviors:

      Analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being

      Provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes in service delivery and practice to improve the quality of social services.

 

 

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will read historical documents pertaining to the client population served by the agency, including prior legislative initiatives and agency policies. Then, discuss with MSW field supervisor.

2. The student will review current materials pertaining to the client population served by the agency, including proposed policy changes and procedures at the local, state, and national level.

3. The student will discuss the impact of social policy issues at the direct service, organizational and community level with their MSW Supervisor.

4. The student will attend relevant meetings (City Council, County Board, Tribal meetings, Legislative hearings and regional meetings) where policy issues are discussed

5. The student will participate in ďDay at the CapitalĒ activities sponsored by NASW or another group

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials __________

 

9.  PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY AND CAREER-LONG LEARNING

Practice Behaviors:

      Practice personal reflection, and self-correction to assure continual professional development

      Engage in career-long learning

Sample Learning Activities

1. The student will have ongoing dialogue with their MSW supervisor, colleagues and others regarding the role of self-care in professional social work practice.

2. The student will identify a range of coping strategies, appropriate to their professional social work practice.

3. The student will develop and discuss a plan to engage in career-long learning

Completion Date_______

Supervisorís Initials______

 

 

 

 

 

All Learning Contracts must include cover page and signature page.  See below examples.

Cover page information:

Learning Contract

Field I or II

Date (from – to)

Placement:             Name of Agency

Address:                Agency address

                              Agency phone

Student:                 Name

                              Address

                              Phone

                              Email

MSW Supervisor: Name

                              Phone

                              Email

Faculty Liaison:    Name

                              Phone

                              Email

 

 

 

Example of Signature Page (Last page of contract)

 

____________________________________________________________

MSW student Intern                                                               Date

 

_____________________________________________________________

MSW Supervisor                                                                    Date

 

_____________________________________________________________

UMD Faculty Liaison                                                                  Date

_____________________________________________________________

On-site Agency Supervisor (non-MSW)                                Date

 

 

 

                 

 


E.   Second Year Learning Contract Guidelines

In the second year, the placement focus is on the application of major practice theories related to interventions with individuals, families, organizations, and communities within the advanced generalist model, as well as on professional and personal growth. Skill application, increased self-awareness, and growth toward autonomous practice will be expected.

As previously noted, the possible learning assignments are merely general guidelines. Tasks for a particular student must be specifically tailored to the learning opportunities of the placement agency and the studentís unique learning style.

Child Welfare Scholars are required to also complete an "Addendum to Field Learning Contract" that includes the following:

  1. The field agency description should describe clearly the child welfare services provided by your unit and the agency
  2. Describe clients who receive child welfare services from your agency.  What % of the clients on your caseload (or % of the agency's clients) are "IV-E eligible"? (You may need to discuss "IV-E eligibility" with your MSW supervisor or administrators of the agency in order to answer this item)
  3. Identification and assessment of child abuse and neglect:

a.     Discuss the risk assessment instruments (if any) used in your agency

b.     Discuss the process of risk assessment with appropriate workers, including discussion of risk factors, behavioral and emotional indicators of neglect, and cultural/racial issues considered in assessment.

4.     Knowledge of community: Describe, and discuss with your Field Supervisor, the roles and responsibilities of the following in relation to child welfare/child protection in the community.

A. Your field agency

B.  Schools

C.  Law Enforcement

D.  Courts, prosecutors, agency attorneys

E.  Health Care System

F.  Specialized agencies, e.g. for sexual abuse, crisis nurseries, foster care, etc

 

5.  Understand the impact of domestic violence on child welfare cases and strategies for

     responding effectively.  Complete at least 10 hours of domestic violence related activities

     to enhance this understanding from a list of opportunities provided to child welfare scholars

     (e.g., training, observation of court hearings, observing groups, touring community agencies).

 

Additionally, students should consult the "Field Information for Child Welfare Scholars" link on the Department web site for specific activities which should be discussed with their Agency Supervisor as they draft their learning contracts.  This can be found at: 

http://www.d.umn.edu/sw/field/cwfieldinfo.html

FIELD II: LEARNING CONTRACT GUIDELINES

In developing their learning contracts, students must develop learning activities to address each major learning area and the practice behaviors that accompany them. The learning activities should be designed to allow the students opportunities to achieve and master the practice behaviors. Sample learning activities are provided below.

1. ADVANCED MICRO PRACTICE WITH INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES AND   SMALL   GROUPS

Practice Behaviors:

    Take independent initiative to negotiate, mediate, and advocate with clients

    Demonstrate empathy and other interpersonal skills

    Utilize a problem-solving model to autonomously collect, organize, and interpret client data, assess strengths and limitations, develop mutually agreed upon outcomes, goals and objectives, implement appropriate prevention and interventions strategies, facilitate transitions and endings and critically analyze, monitor and evaluate interventions in order to help diverse clients to resolve problems and enhance client capacities

 

 Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will engage in at least two case assignments per semester involving complex practice issues with multiple systems in assessing and implementing intervention strategies with client systems.  (Examples of multiple systems: judicial, educational, health care, child welfare, and tribal).

2. Organize and facilitate on-going client group or family sessions.

Completion Date __________

Supervisor's Initials __________

 

2. ADVANCED MACRO PRACTICE WITH ORGANIZATATIONS, COMMUNITIES

Practice Behaviors:

    Actively participate in a variety of community activities and events to promote social and economic justice

    Apply policy practice skills to advanced generalist practice

    Provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes in service delivery and practice to improve the quality of social services

    Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals

 

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. Student will attend events at the local or state level that promote social and economic justice.

2. The student will participate with the (placement agency) in conducting program development activities including a needs assessment, the development of services, funding raising/grant writing, and/or program evaluation.

3. The student will assess the organizational dynamics of (placement agency) by identifying the key parts of the structure, system interrelationships, organizational culture, agency communication patterns, funding flows, and other organizational dynamics specific to the agency and initiate actions to achieve organizational goals.

4. The student will:

      identify a significant community problem and/or issue,

      systematically assess this problem through a model of community assessment (community development, social action, social planning and/or systemic change) learned through their MSW coursework,

      identify relevant points of community  intervention,

      assess the level of impact the intervention has on the community.

      Use policy practice skills to influence key decisions makers to promote change

5. The student will:

      identify a significant organizational or community issue,

      research the policy issues (at both the system and organizational level) which affect this  issue,

      identify the effects of these policies on clients, service organizations and the broader community

      present their analysis to their supervisor.

      Participate in advocacy efforts to influence the policy issue (e.g., lobbying, letter writing, attending legislative hearings etc.)

The analysis should reflect multi-level thinking and an understanding of the complex nature of this topic.

Completion Date __________

Supervisor's Initials __________

 

 

 

 

 

3. INTEGRATION OF THEORY, SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL KNOWLDEGE

Practice Behaviors:

    Autonomously apply models of assessment, prevention, intervention and evaluation

    Apply scientific and technological knowledge to effectively serve clients

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will identify and discuss with their MSW supervisor specific theoretical approaches and apply these to their placement at both the micro and macro levels.

2. The student will identify and present research findings that they have learned in their MSW coursework that can be incorporated in their practice at the (field agency).

3. The student and MSW supervisor will discuss how technology is being used in their field setting to serve clients.

Completion Date __________

Supervisor's Initials __________

 

4.       PROFFESSIONALISM

Practice Behaviors:

    Engage in self-reflection, self-monitoring and self-correction with particular attention to issues of diversity

 

    Assume appropriate professional roles and maintain appropriate boundaries with particular attention to diverse populations

 

    Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication in challenging and difficult situations

 

    Develop a plan for post-MSW, career-long learning and ways to contribute to the professional knowledge base

    Demonstrate clear and concise oral and written communication

 

Sample Learning Activities: 

1. After observing and reflecting on the different ways that agency staff functions in various organizational settings, the student will analyze how these styles would fit into their own professional technique. The student will discuss this experience with their MSW supervisor.

2. The student will engage in the assessment of their conflict management skills and participate in a conflict resolution process. The student will share this experience with their MSW supervisor.

3. The student will develop a plan for post-MSW, career-long learning and ways to contribute to the professional knowledge base

4. The student will have on-going dialogue about their unique sense of professional identity, including professional roles and setting professional boundaries and by the end of the placement the student will succinctly articulate this to their supervisor.

5. The student will systematically assess their field agency work culture and identify what administrators have done (or could do) to create cultures that are optimally positive for workers and clients.

6. The student will complete a wide variety of writing tasks relevant to their placement (e.g., formal letters, intra-agency memos, brochures, policy manuals, and grants).

7. The student will participate in agency presentations, and/or facilitate team, or subcommittee meetings.

Completion Date __________

Supervisor's Initials __________

 

5. EVALUATION

Practice Behaviors:

    Systematically collect, analyze and report information that can inform relevant practice decisions

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will reflect on the direct practice interventions they have chosen, analyzing their level of effectiveness and discuss with their supervisor. 

2. The student will develop a plan to evaluate a specific program or community project and implement it, as possible.

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials ___________

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. SOCIAL WORK VALUES AND ETHICS

Practice Behaviors:

    Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice

Possible Learning Assignments:  Each semester, the student will apply the NASW Code of Ethics to an ethical issue at the micro and macro practice levels and then systematically problem-solve around the issues.

Completion Date __________

Supervisor's Initials __________

 

7. DIVERSITY (10% (48 hours) of the studentís field placement activity must focus on this area)

    Seek out situations beyond oneís comfort zone in an attempt to broaden cultural understanding and professional competence

 

Sample Learning Activities:

1. The student will engage in opportunities to advance their knowledge and skills in understanding the worldview and life experience of diverse populations, in order to enrich their practice. The student will discuss these experiences with their MSW supervisor.

2. The student will participate in the agencyís Diversity Committee.

3. The student will attend and participate in community meetings that focus on the needs of diverse populations. (i.e. School District Desegregation Committee, City Human Rights Commission, American Indian Commission, Twin Ports Gay Pride Committee).

4. The student will participate in advocacy at the community level which may include public hearings, marches and demonstrations.

5. Studentís caseload will represent diverse clients.

6. Student will participate in activities with colleagues and community members from diverse backgrounds.

Completion Date ___________                                

Supervisorís Initials ____________

 

 

 

 

 

8.  ASSESSMENT OF CULTURAL COMPETENCY

Practice Behaviors:

    Plan for ongoing development of cultural competence both in oneís practice and within agency and community settings.

Sample Learning Activities::

1. Using the concepts and models of assessment learned in their coursework, the student will assess the cultural competency of their field agency and formulate strategies of interventions. 

2. Using a model of assessing cultural competency learned in their MSW coursework, the student will assess their own cultural competency with a range of diverse populations and develop a plan to enhance their skills.

3. The student will complete a needs assessment regarding serving diverse populations.

Completion Date __________

Supervisorís Initials ___________

 

All Learning Contracts must include cover page and signature page.  See below examples.

Cover page information:

Learning Contract

Field I or II

Date (from – to)

Placement:             Name of Agency

 

Address:                Agency address

                              Agency phone

 

Student:                 Name

                              Address

                              Phone

                              Email

 

MSW Supervisor: Name

                              Phone

                              Email

 

Faculty Liaison:    Name

                              Phone

                              Email

 

 

Example of Signature Page (Last page of contract)

 

____________________________________________________________

MSW Student Intern                                                              Date

 

_____________________________________________________________

MSW Supervisor                                                                    Date

 

_____________________________________________________________

UMD Faculty Liaison                                                                  Date

 

_____________________________________________________________

On-site Agency Supervisor (non-MSW)                                Date
XIII. FIELD EVALUATION

Field evaluation is divided into two parts:  (1) evaluation of the student and (2) evaluation of the agency.  Both of these evaluation components are explained in detail below.

A.  Evaluation of Student Performance

The Student Performance Evaluation Form is provided by the Dept. of Social Work.  The data which the Agency Supervisor and the student use to determine the studentís progress in meeting the criteria for evaluation will be drawn from a variety of sources, including: written records, oral reports of activities, tapes of the students work, direct observation, and feedback from other staff engaged with the student.

  1. At the beginning of the field placement, the student, Agency Supervisor, and Faculty Liaison collaborate in the development of a learning contract that will assist the student in meeting the field objectives.
  2. The student meets weekly with the Agency MSW Supervisor to review the studentís adjustment to the agency and the studentís progress.  The student can take this opportunity to give feedback regarding supervision.
  3.  At the end of the Fall semester, the Agency Supervisor and student complete the Student Performance Evaluation From.  A meeting is held between these two and the Faculty Liaison to examine this form and discuss and review the studentís performance in the agency.  Again, this meeting is an opportunity to share their perceptions of the various aspects of the field placement and to make changes where necessary.  Any revisions are noted in the Learning Contract.  The supervisorís evaluation will be placed in the studentís file. 
  4. The final evaluation of the student occurs at the end of the Spring Semester.  Again, the Agency Supervisor completes the Student Performance Evaluation Form.  This form serves as the basis for discussion in the final evaluation meeting between the Agency Supervisor, the Faculty Liaison, and the student.  The discussion focuses on the studentís performance.  The evaluation form is signed signifying that they have been read by the each of the three parties and placed in the studentís file.  Based on this conference and on all other aspects of the studentís work (both in placement and in field seminar) the Field Liaison submits an ďSĒ (satisfactory) or and ďNĒ (not satisfactory) grade for the student.

B.  Studentís Evaluation of the Agency

The Department of Social Work recognizes the importance of receiving student input regarding their field placements. One method by which the Department monitors and maintains a high quality field placement program is through perceptions studentsí offer.

The student can share his/her ongoing perceptions of the supervisorís role and performance throughout the field placement.  This can occur in the weekly conferences, the mid-year and final evaluations, or in whatever manner seems appropriate.  The responsibility of the agency and the Agency Supervisor are clearly outlined at the beginning of the placement.  Some of these are also written in the studentís learning contract.

The questionnaire asks students to assess the agency on a number of different criteria based on their field experiences.  The questionnaire (Appendix D) is completed by the student at the end of the field placement and returned to the Department of Social Work before the student receives a final grade.  It is expected that the student and Agency MSW Supervisor and others involved in the studentís learning experiences will discuss the studentís perceptions at the end of the placement.  The Department will not release information from specific forms.  The results of the studentsí evaluation will be kept in summary fashion.

Students should share any problems or other perceptions with the Faculty Liaison on an ongoing basis, either confidentially or in seminar.

C.  Summer Field Placement Evaluations

Evaluation of the student occurs at the end of the block placement.  Evaluation follows the same format as the academic year placement described above, although mid-term evaluations are scheduled as needed.  During the summer, agency evaluation by the student is the same as the Academic Year Placement evaluation.

D.  Calendar for Student Evaluations

The student, Agency Supervisor, and Faculty Liaison have special responsibilities for participating in the evaluation process of the student in Field.  The chart below outlines the activities and procedures for this process relating to concurrent placements.

FALL SEMESTER

  1. The student and the Agency MSW Supervisor have the responsibility for developing the Learning Contract.
  2. Sets up Faculty Liaison visit to agency.
  3. Meets with Agency Supervisor and Faculty Liaison to review progress to date (adjustment to agency) and to make necessary revisions in the Learning Contract.
  4. Completes a written self-evaluation using Student Performance Evaluation Form.
  5. Meets with Agency Supervisor and Faculty Liaison for midyear evaluation. Learning Contract additions or revisions can be made.

SPRING SEMESTER

  1. Completes a written self-evaluation using the Student Performance Evaluation Form.
  2. Meets with Agency Supervisor and Faculty Liaison for end of year evaluation.
  3. Completes an evaluation of the placement experience.

NOTE: Students must submit weekly logs to the Faculty Liaison at least three times during the semester or summer session.  The students include their accounts of their subjective and objective learning experiences, as well as integrate their classroom learning with their practical experiences in the field.  These three activities will be major contributors to the studentsí grade at the end of placement.

 

 

Agency MSW/On-Site Supervisor

FALL SEMESTER

  1. Helps the student to develop the Learning Contract.
  2. Gives ongoing feedback to students about their performance in the agency and fulfillment of the Learning Contract.
  3. Regularly review adjustment to the placement and assist in making necessary revisions of the Learning Contract.
  4. Meets with the Faculty Liaison to review #1.
  5. Completes the Student Performance Evaluation Form.  Meets with student and Faculty Liaison to discuss this, and the studentís performance to date.
  6. Assists in making additions and revisions to Learning Contract to address identified needs.
  7. Gives ongoing feedback to student.
  8. Confers with Faculty Liaison.

SPRING SEMESTER

  1. Completes the Student Performance Evaluation Form.
  2. Meets with student and Faculty Liaison to discuss studentís performance within the agency and performance of the Learning Contract and #1 above.
 
Faculty Liaison

FALL SEMESTER

  1. Assists in the development of the Learning Contract by making the field visit.
  2. Gives ongoing feedback about general performance (this can occur either in the seminar, in private, or in the journal).
  3. Makes field visit with Agency Supervisor to discuss studentís performance and written evaluations done by student and Agency Supervisor.
  4. Collects these written evaluations and places them in studentís file.
  5. Assists in making additions and revisions of Learning Contracts to address identified needs the student may have.
  6. Gives ongoing feedback to student in seminars and journals.

 

 

SPRING SEMESTER

1.     Meets with student and Agency Supervisor to evaluate the studentís performance.  Assesses all facets of the studentís work both in the field placement and in seminar.

  1. Collects the completed Student Performance Evaluation Form from the student and the agency and places them in the studentís file.
  2. Submits a ďSĒ or ďNĒ grade for student based on the above.

 

XIV. Grading Procedures for Field

The field course is graded on a satisfactory/not satisfactory basis.  The responsibility for the assignment of student grades rests exclusively with the Faculty Liaison.  The Faculty Liaison will receive a recommendation from and confer with the Agency Supervisor before assigning the final grade.  Students are to be assessed and graded on their performance in the field seminar as well as in their field placement.  Grades for field are assigned only after an entire year of fieldwork has been completed.  At the end of the Fall semester (and, for Block placements, at the end of the first summer session), students are given an X grade.  At the end of the last grading period (Spring semester or second summer session), the grades are changed to an S if the student successfully completes the entire field experience.  Students are responsible for ensuring that all required paperwork is completed, including an evaluation of their field experience.  Additional requirements as specified by the Faculty Liaison must also be completed and that the students attend all seminars.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX A:   Agency Application



UMD-MSW FIELD PROGRAM

AGENCY APPLICATION FOR THE FIELD PROGRAM

 

Agency Name _______________________________________

Date ____________________

 

Address ______________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

Contact Person ______________________________________

Position _________________

 

Telephone ______________________________

E-mail Address _____________________

 

Fax __________________________________

 

 

≠≠≠≠≠PART I. AGENCY DESCRIPTION

A.   Is your agency:  Private non-profit ____ Tribal _____ County _____ Other ____

B.  What is the mission of the agency?

 

 

 

 

C.  What is the population being served?

 

 

 

 

D.  What types of services are provided by the agency?

 

 

 

E.   What methods of intervention are used (i.e. casework, group work, community organizing, etc.)?

 

F.   Describe the experience and educational background of the MSW social worker available for student supervision (The MSW is required by our program to meet CSWE accreditation standards).  Attach a resume.

 

PART II.        STUDENT - FIELD PLACEMENT DESCRIPTION

A.  Describe the educational experiences available to students.  What tasks and responsibilities could be assigned to the student?  Differentiate between Field I and II (This section will determine if you will be assigned Field I or Field II students.  You may want to review the requirements for Field I and II in the Field Manual.  The Director of Field is available for assistance and further discussion).

 

 

 

 

 

B.  What types of clients will the student be exposed to?

 

 

 

 

C.  What resources would students have the opportunity to utilize in performing above tasks?  Will office or desk space be made available to the student?

 

 

 

 

D.    How will supervision be provided (i.e. availability and frequency of supervision)?  

No less than one hour per week of intensive, teaching, individual MSW supervision is needed.  However, to meet the educational needs of the students in the optimal fashion, this is probably only the minimum.

 

 

 

 

E.   To what extent can students participate in staff meetings relating to cases or projects?

 

 

 

 

F.   Will students be able to be exposed to/or participate in administrative meetings, research and evaluation projects (if outside their job descriptions), and policy development tasks?

 

 

G.  Will the student have the opportunity to attend and participate in workshops and training sessions?

 

 

 

H.  Does your agency provide an opportunity for students to get experience working with diverse (people of color, lesbian/gay/bi-sexual/transgender, and other oppressed populations) individuals/groups?  Please explain.

 

 

Is it necessary for students to have a car?

Yes:_____

No:______

 

If needed on the job, will you provide travel expense reimbursement?

Yes:_____

No:______

 

Are stipends or salary available?

Yes:_____

No:______

 

Hours/days needed: _____________________________________________________________

Does your agency have a web site?

Yes:_____

No:______

 

If so, please indicate the URL: _____________________________________________________

Submitted by name/title: ______________________________

Date: _______________

Agency Director signature: _________________________________

 

 

Please Return to:

Kathy Heltzer, Director of Field

220 Bohannon Hall

UMD

Duluth, Minnesota 55812

218-726-8935

kheltzer@d.umn.edu



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX B:   Agency Contract

(Agreement to Placement Form)



AGREEMENT TO PLACEMENT FORM

UMD-MSW Field Program

Agency Contract

Name of Student: ______________________________________________________________

Agency Director: __________________________________________

Phone: ____________

 

Agency: ______________________________________________________________________

Agency Address: _______________________________________________________________

FAX/E-Mail: __________________________________________________________________

MSW Supervisor: _________________________________________

Phone:____________

 

Supervisor e-mail: ________________________________________

 

 

Address if different from Agency: _________________________________________________

On-site Supervisor (if applicable): __________________________      Phone: ______________

On-site Supervisor e-mail: _____________________________________

(Non MSW)

Student Placement Level (check one):           

Field I _____________

Field II _____________

Placement Beginning (insert year):           

Fall _______________

Summer ____________

We certify that:

  1. Student Supervision

The MSW Supervisor will spend no less than one hour per week of individual, intensive, teaching supervision for the student.  The meetings will be held on a routine basis at a designated time and place each week.  The MSW Supervisor (or On-Site Supervisor if there is no on-site MSW) will coordinate the studentís work with other related personnel in the agency.

  1. Supervisor Attendance at Department Meetings

The Supervisor(s) will attend the two Field Program-sponsored meetings for the supervisors each year.

  1. Agency/Supervisor Responsibilities

We have reviewed the agency and MSW Supervisor responsibilities in the Field Manual and we agree to meet them.

  1. Learning Contract

We agree to provide the student with the educational experiences which will fulfill the requirements of the Learning Contract.

  1. Student Safety

We agree to conduct personal safety risk assessments on each case/project, which we will assign to the student and we will take appropriate protective measures, when needed.

 

  1. Outside MSW Supervisor

If an outside MSW Supervisor is needed, we agree that he/she and the On-Site Supervisor will meet to develop the studentís Learning Contract, to orient the student and both will participate in the Field Liaisonís visits to the agency to evaluate student progress.  A copy of the contract with the outside MSW Supervisor is stapled to this form (this contract should include those elements described under Criteria for Selecting Agency Supervisors)

  1. Auto Liability Insurance

If it is required that the student transports clients, the student will be covered with the agencyís auto liability insurance policy to supplement the studentís/Universityís auto policy.

  1. Compliance with these Requirements

We understand that each agency in the UMD-MSW Field Program is evaluated by the UMD-faculty each year and that non-compliance may jeopardize our participation in future years.

 

Signed by: Agency Director: ________________________________________________

 

MSW Supervisor: _________________________________________________________

 

On-Site Supervisor (if applicable):     ___________________________________________


Date:  __________________     

Please return to:

Kathy Heltzer, Director of Field

Department of Social Work

220 Bohannon Hall

University of Minnesota, Duluth

Duluth, MN  55812

kheltzer@d.umn.edu


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX C:   Student Evaluation

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: FIELD I

Student Name   ___________________________ Mid-term ______ Final __________

Agency Supervisor _____________________________  Agency __________________

Faculty Liaison ________________________ Concurrent or Block ≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠____________(year)

This evaluation should be used in conjunction with the Learning Contract to determine the degree of student learning and the grade for the Field I placement.  The focus in the Field I placement is on advanced social work practice skills. Students should demonstrate competence in the identified practice behaviors by the completion of their Field I placement. The Agency Supervisor, student, and Faculty Liaison sign the form to signify that the evaluation has been discussed. 

Please explain your ratings with specific comments and/or examples. The ratings and comments should be made on the basis of the skill levels the student should have at the end of the placement. [Note: If the student didnít have the opportunity to exhibit a particular skill, please specifically note this with an explanation, instead of trying to provide a numerical rating.] This may be the case at the time of the mid-year evaluation.

 

See header above for rating levels.

1.  Theory and Principles of Generalist Practice: Practice Behaviors

a.     Applies the ecological-systems perspective to case              1     2     3     4

situations.

b.     Applies the strengths perspective to case situations.            1     2      3     4

c.     Applies multi-level intervention to case situations.              1     2      3     4

d.     Applies the eclectic use of theory to case situations.            1     2      3     4

e.     Utilizes conceptual frameworks to guide the process           1     2      3     4

of assessment, intervention, and evaluation.

Comments:

     

 

 

 

                             

 

 

 

2.  Use of the Problem-Solving Model and Strengths-Based Perspective: Practice Behaviors

a.     Develops a mutually agreed on focus of work and                      1     2     3     4

desired outcomes.

b.     Assesses client strengths and limitations.                                     1     2     3     4

c.     Develops mutually agreed-on intervention goals and                  1     2     3     4

objectives.

d.     Selects appropriate intervention strategies.                                  1     2     3     4

e.     Helps clients resolve problems.                                                    1     2     3     4

f.      Negotiates, mediates, and advocates for clients.                           1     2     3     4

g.     Critically analyzes, monitors, and evaluates interventions.         1     2     3     4

h.     Collects, organizes, and interprets client data in developing        1     2     3     4

assessments.

Comments:

 

 

 

3.  Social Work Values and Ethics: Practice Behaviors

a.     Tolerates ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts.                     1     2     3     4

b.     Applies social work values in a professional setting.                    1     2     3     4

c.     Makes ethical decisions by applying standards of the                   1     2     3     4

National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and,

as applicable, of the International Federation of Social

Workers/International Association of Schools of Social Work

Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles.

d.     Recognizes and manages personal values in a way that                1     2     3     4

allow professional values to guide practice.

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

4.  Diversity: Practice Behaviors

a.     Recognizes the extent to which a cultureís structures                   1     2     3     4

 and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or

create or enhance privilege and power.

b.     Gains sufficient self-awareness to minimize the influence of       1     2     3     4

personal biases and values in working with diverse groups.

Comments:

 

 

 

5.  Organizational Structure and Processes: Practice Behaviors

a.     Uses supervision and consultation.                                               1     2     3     4

b.     Effectively practices within an organizational structure.               1     2     3     4

c.     Initiates actions to achieve organizational goals.                           1     2     3     4

d.     Demonstrates a working knowledge of the mission policies,       1     2     3     4

procedures and structure of the field agency.

Comments:

 

 

 

6.  Utilizing Community Resources, Including Scientific and Technological     Developments: Practice Behaviors

a.     Advocates for client access to the services of social work.          1     2     3     4

b.     Demonstrates the ability to appropriately use health and                 1     2     3     4

human services available in the community.

c.     Identifies scientific and technological developments                1     2     3     4

relevant to provide effective services specific to the

field placement setting and client population.

Comments:

 

 

 

 

7.  Interpersonal Skills: Practice Behaviors

a.     Demonstrates effective oral and written communication in          1     2     3     4

working with individuals, families, groups, organizations,

communities, and colleagues.

b.     Uses empathy and other interpersonal skills.                                     1     2     3     4

c.     Demonstrates the ability to provide and receive feedback.           1     2     3     4

d.     Attends to professional social work roles and boundaries.            1     2     3     4

Comments:

 

 

 

8. Social Policy Issues: Practice Behaviors

a.     Analyzes, formulate, and advocate for policies that                     1     2     3     4

advance social well-being

b.     Provides leadership in promoting sustainable changes                   1     2     3     4

in service delivery and practice to improve the quality

of social services.

Comments:

 

 

 

9. Professional Identity and Career-Long Learning: Practice Behaviors

a.     Practices personal self-reflection and self correction                     1     2     3     4

to assure continual professional development.

b.     Engages in career-long learning.                                                      1      2     3     4

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Practice Skills              

Overall, how would you rate this studentís present social                   1     2    3     4                                           work practice level?

Comments:

 

 

 

Learning Contract Review

Staple a photocopy of the studentís Learning Contract to this form and check off learning activities that have been completed to date.  Comment briefly on the studentís performance giving examples. Do you have any concerns with the studentís ability to complete the learning contract or demonstrate competence in the required practice behaviors?

 

 

Assessment of Practice Behaviors

What do you see as the studentís strongest practice behaviors?

What areas should the student devote further energy toward?  How can this be facilitated?

 

 

 

 

Grade

Information on the previous page must clearly document the students suggested grade.

Suggested grade ___________        S = Satisfactory      N = Not Satisfactory

MSW Supervisorís Signature:                                                Date:   __________________________________________            _________                                                

On Site Agency Supervisor (if different) Signature:              Date:                         __________________________________________            _________

Student Signature:                                                                  Date:             __________________________________________            _________

Faculty Liaison Signature:                                                     Date:         __________________________________________            _________

Other Comments:

 

 

Final Evaluation Only

I certify that the student has worked a minimum of 420 hours over the course of the placement period.

Agency Supervisorís Signature _________________________

Date __________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: FIELD II

Student Name   ___________________________ Mid-term ________ Final __________

Agency Supervisor _____________________________  Agency ___________________

Faculty Liaison ________________________ Concurrent or Block ≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠____________(year)

This evaluation should be used in conjunction with the studentís learning contract to determine the studentís level of competence and the grade for the Field II placement.  The focus in the Field II placement is on advanced social work practice. Students should demonstrate competence in the identified practice behaviors by the completion of their Field II placement.  Please explain your ratings with specific comments and/or examples. [If the student didnít have the opportunity to exhibit a particular skill, please note this with an explanation, instead of trying to provide a numerical rating. This may be the case at the time of the mid-year evaluation.]

The practice behaviors below are in relationship to Advanced Generalist Practice.  As such, they assume the ability to autonomously address complex person-in-environment issues with diverse populations in micro and macro practice.

See header for rating levels

1.     Advanced Generalist Micro Practice:  Practice Behaviors

a.   Substantively and affectively engage with client systems    1     2     3     4                                        to autonomously address complex practice situations.

b.   Autonomously develop a mutually agreed upon focus of     1     2     3     4                                        work and desired outcomes in complex practice situations.

c.   Demonstrate the ability to autonomously collect, organize, 1     2     3     4                                        and interpret client data in complex practice situations.

d.   Autonomously develop mutually agreed on intervention     1     2     3     4                                        goals and objectives in complex practice situations.

e.   Autonomously select culturally appropriate intervention    1     2     3     4                                        strategies.

f.    Autonomously implement prevention interventions            1     2     3     4                                        that enhance client capacity.

g.   Help clients resolve complex problems with a focus            1     2     3     4                                        on culturally competent practice.

h.   Autonomously facilitate transitions and endings in              1     2     3     4                                        complex practice situations.

Comments:

 

 

     

2.   Advanced Generalist Macro Practice: Practice Behaviors

a.  Actively participate in efforts to promote social and             1     2     3     4                                    economic justice.

b.  Take independent initiative in advocating with client            1     2     3     4                                        systems.

c.   Engage in policy practice as an advanced generalist              1     2     3     4                                        social worker.

d.  Provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes            1     2     3     4                                    in social service delivery and practice to improve quality

e.  Autonomously initiate actions to achieve organizational       1     2     3     4                                      goals and promote change.

Comments:

 

 

3.   Integration of Theory, Science and Technology: Practice Behaviors

    a.  Autonomously apply models of assessment, prevention,     1     2     3     4                                         intervention and evaluation.

    b. Apply scientific and technological knowledge to                    1     2     3     4                                         effectively serve clients.

            Comments:

 

 

4.   Professionalism: Practice Behaviors                                    

a.  Engage in self-reflection, self-monitoring, and                        1     2     3     4                                               self-correction with particular attention to issues of diversity

      b.   Assume appropriate professional roles and maintain           1     2     3     4                                         boundaries with particular attention to diverse populations.

      c.   Demonstrate professional demeanor in challenging               1     2     3     4                                        and difficult situations.

      d.   Engage in career long learning and participate in activities    1     2     3     4                                        which contribute to the social work profession.

      e.   In complex practice situations, communicate in an               1     2     3     4                                        articulate, clear and concise manner.

Comments:

 

 

5.   Evaluation: Practice Behavior

a.     Systematically collects, analyzes and reports information                   1    2    3    4        that can inform relevant practice decisions.

Comments:

 

 

6.   Social Work Values and Ethics: Practice Behavior   

      a.                                                                                                        Identify ethical dilemmas in complex practice situations        1     2     3   4                                      and apply the NASW Code of Ethics in resolving them.

Comments:

 

 

7.   Diversity: Practice Behavior

      a.   Seek out situations beyond oneís comfort zone in an attempt              1     2     3   4         to broaden cultural understanding and professional competence.

Comments:

 

 

8.   Development of Cultural Competence: Practice Behavior

     a.   Engage in ongoing cultural competence development.                           1     2     3   4

 

Comments:

 

 

 

Overall Practice Skills                                 

Overall, how would you rate this studentís present social                                1    2    3    4                                      work practice level?

Comments:

 

 


 

Learning Contract Review

Staple a photocopy of the studentís Learning Contract to this form and check off learning activities that have been completed to date.  Comment briefly on the studentís performance giving examples. Do you have any concerns with the studentís ability to complete the learning contract or demonstrate competence in the practice behaviors?

Assessment of Practice Behaviors

What do you see as the studentís strongest practice behaviors?

 

 

 

What areas should the student devote further energy toward?  How can this be facilitated?

 

 

 

Suggested Grade:  ___________        S = Satisfactory     N = Not Satisfactory

Note: Information on the previous page must clearly document the suggested grade.

 

Please sign the form to signify that the evaluation has been discussed.

MSW Supervisorís Signature:                                                 Date:

___________________________________________           _________

 

On Site Agency Supervisor (if different) Signature:               Date: 

___________________________________________           _________

 

Student Signature:                                                                   Date:       

___________________________________________           _________

 

Faculty Liaison Signature:                                                      Date:  

___________________________________________           _________

 

Final Evaluation Only

I certify that the student has worked a minimum of 480 hours over the course of the placement period.

 

Agency Supervisorís Signature _________________________

Date __________________


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX D:   Student Evaluation of Field/Agency



MSW STUDENT EVALUATION OF FIELD PLACEMENT AND PROGRAM

Answer each of the following questions as indicated. Many of the questions ask for a rating on a scale of 1-5. ď1 indicates a negative response and ď5Ē indicates an overall very positive response. Remember that this is an evaluation of the Field Program, not the whole MSW Department.  Add any specific comments you wish. Do not sign your name.

 

Least_____Most

1. Agency

Please indicate the name of your field agency:

_______________________________________________________________

Overall, how satisfied were you with your field placement experience?

 

 

1    2    3    4    5

 

Would you recommend this placement to other MSW students?

(1 = Absolutely not!  2 = I might recommend it.   3= I do not know. 

4 = Probably I would recommend it.    5 = Yes!)

1    2    3    4    5

 

Any additional comments you would like to share regarding this field placement/agency or supervisor?

 

 

 

 

2. Supervisor

What did you think of the MSW supervision you received?

What did you think of the ďon-siteĒ (not your primary MSW) supervision you received?

 

1    2    3    4    5

1    2    3    4     5

___Not applicable for my placement.

3. Field Manual

On a scale of 1-5, how helpful was the Field Manual to you in arranging for and then completing your field placement requirements?

Any additional comments you would like to share regarding the field manual or other written field program materials?

 

 

 

 

1    2    3    4    5

 

4.  Field Liaison

On a Scale of 1-5, how helpful was the Field (faculty) Liaison during your field placement?

 

What were the most helpful things your faculty liaison did over the course of your field placement?

 

 

 

What were the least helpful things your faculty liaison did over the course of your field placement?

 

 

In what ways could have the field liaison been more helpful and/or supportive to you during your field placement?

 

 

 

1    2    3    4    5

 

 

 

5.  Field Journal and Other Assignments

On a scale of 1-5, how helpful were the field journal assignments in helping you to integrate what you were learning in the classroom with what you were doing in your field placement?

 

 

On a scale of 1-5, how helpful were the other assignments (presentations, online discussions, cultural competency assignments) in facilitating your overall learning with respect to your fieldwork?

 

 

 

1    2    3    4    5

 

 

 

1    2    3    4    5

6. Overall Field Program

On a scale of 1-5, what is your overall assessment of the UMD Field Program to date?

On a scale of 1-5, how did your field placement contribute to attainment of your personal learning goals with respect to social work practice?

Any additional comments you would like to share regarding the UMD MSW Field Program?

 

 

 

 

 

1    2     3     4     5

 

1    2     3     4     5

 


Additional information: (circle/insert)


You were in school this past year

Full time (10 credits or more)

Part time

 

You are a

Standard program student (51 credit)

Advanced standing student (34 credit)

 

Indicate which field placement you have just completed

Field I

Field II

 

You are

Male

Female

 

You were employed this last school year

 

Full-time

Part-time

Not employed

 

To get to UMD you travel

25 or more miles

Less than 25 miles

 

On a scale of 1-5, how helpful was Department of Social Work Field Web Site in providing you with needed information and resources?

 

1 (not helpful)   2(somewhat helpful)

3 (of some help)  4 (helpful)  5 (very helpful)

Please indicate what type of field placement you completed

Block field placement (summer)

Field placement during the academic year

 

Please indicate what year(s) you completed your field placement

2009-2010

Summer 2010

Thanks for your help!!!



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX E:  Background check forms


 


class=Section7>

INFORMATION AND CONSENT CONCERNING CONSUMER AND INVESTIGATIVE CONSUMER REPORTS FOR ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP PURPOSES

(Required before proceeding with background checks by Act 15 U.S.C.)

 

TO BE COMPLETED BY ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT:

 

Place cursor here and enter course number and title     

 

Department of Social Work  218-726-7245            

              

Place cursor here and enter Student's full name

 

STUDENT: Please read the information below and complete the following forms

Information and Consent form (see page 2)

Disclosure Statement

 

This form has been provided to you because the University may request a consumer report and/or investigative consumer report, as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act, which also governs the procurement of background reports for academic internship placement.  The University will request such reports solely for internship-related purposes.

 

The consumer report and/or investigative consumer report will be obtained from HireRight, Inc. (ďHireRightĒ) located at 2100 Main Street, Suite 400, Irvine, CA 92614. HireRight can be contacted at 800-400-2761. The information sought may include but not be limited to a number of sources, such as criminal conviction records; public court records; and when applicable, Department of Motor Vehicle records; credit reports; verification of highest degree; and, if applicable, current professional license or certification earned. HireRight and the University will keep the information in strict confidence.

 

Although HireRight may not be doing a background check on your credit history, since such credit report information is not requested when such information has no internship-related purpose, the rules outlined in the Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 U.S.C ß 1681g(a), also apply to criminal background checks and, upon your request, HireRight shall disclose to you a copy of the report in your file at the time of the request. Also on request, you can receive a copy of the ďSummary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting ActĒ prepared pursuant to 15 U.S.C. ß 1681g(c). You have the right to request additional disclosures of the nature and scope of the investigation pursuant to a pre-adverse or adverse action by the University.

 

CONSENT

I have read carefully and understand this Information and Consent Form and, by my signature below, consent to the release of a consumer and/or investigative consumer report, as defined above, to the University in conjunction with my letter or indication of interest in an internship placement. This consent form in original, faxed, photocopied or electronic form, will be valid for any reports that may be requested by the University at this time or in the future relative to any academic placement.

 

 

STUDENT SIGNATURE                                                DATE

 

PRINT NAME

 

 

 

 

 

NOTICE TO APPLICANTS WHO ARE CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS

Under section 1786.22 of the California Civil Code, you may inspect the file maintained on you by HireRight. You may also obtain a copy of this file, upon submitting proper identification and paying the cost of duplication services, by appearing at HireRight offices in person, during normal business hours and on reasonable notice, or you may receive a summary of the file by mail. HireRight has trained personnel available to explain your file to you, including any coded information. If you appear in person, one other person may accompany you.

 

NOTICE TO RESIDENTS OF CALIFORNIA, MINNESOTA, AND OKLAHOMA

In accordance with the laws of California, Minnesota, and Oklahoma, a resident of one of those states has the right to receive a free copy of his or her consumer report and/or investigative consumer report by checking the box.

Yes, I wish to receive a free copy of the consumer report and/or investigative consumer report requested on me.

 

TO BE COMPLETED BY APPLICANT (PLEASE PRINT):

 

Last Name                            First                       Middle

Present Address

City/State/Zip Code                                             Phone

E-Mail Address:

Social Security #                    Date of Birth (for ID purposes only)

Name on Driverís License                             Driverís License #

State of License                    Expiration Date on License

List any other CITIES AND STATES in which you have lived during the previous 7 years.

 

 


List any other LAST NAMES you have used during the previous 7 years.

 

 


PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED FORM VIA MAIL OR FAX:

 

Mailing address

Audrey Temple Department of Human Resources

Attn: Background Checks

255 Darland Adminstration Building1049 University Drive, Duluth, MN 55812

 

Fax  218-726-7505


DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

 

As part of the final approval process of a placement, the University conducts reference and background checking. The University also requires you to disclose, in writing, all relevant facts and information needed for a full and fair understanding of any of the following:

 

ē Professional misconduct or sanctions (e.g., disbarment by a federal agency; any form of professional discipline or license restriction or surrender; an admission or determination that you have committed research misconduct)

 

ē Any harassment or discrimination you were found to have committed by any court, adjudicative body, or administrative body, including but not limited to any findings of harassment or discrimination made by present or former employers

 

ē Any felony, gross misdemeanor, or misdemeanor for which you were convicted or pleaded no contest. (this includes traffic violations and underage consumption)

 

Engagement in any such conduct may not, in and of itself, disqualify you from a placement at the University; however, failure to disclose such information, or any misrepresentation made in connection with the disclosure, would be grounds to revoke an offer of appointment or terminate subsequent employment. Information is kept strictly confidential and is available only on a need-to-know basis. This information will not be shared with the Academic Department.

 

  I have nothing to disclose.

  I have the following information to disclose (please provide explanation as appropriate and attach additional sheets if necessary):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Print name

 

Signature                                              Date

 

 

 

Please return completed form by mail or fax:

Audrey Temple

Department of Human Resources

Attn: Background Checks

255 Darland Administration Building

1049 University Drive Duluth, MN 55812

Fax: 218-726-7505

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX E:  CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards


Council on Social Work Education

 

 

 

 

 

Educational Policy and

Accreditation Standards

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2001, Council on Social Work Education, Inc. All rights reserved.  Sections renumbered December 2001, released April 2002, corrected May 2002, July 2002, November 2002.


 

CONTENTS

 

PREAMBLE

 

77

FUNCTIONS OF EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND ACCREDITATION

 

78

 

1.     EDUCATIONAL POLICY

78

 

2.     ACCREDITATION

78

 

3.     RELATIONSHIP OF EDUCATIONAL POLICY TO ACCREDITATION

79

EDUCATIONAL POLICY

 

 

 

1.     PURPOSES

80

 

2.     STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

82

 

3.     PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

82

 

4.     FOUNDATION CURRICULUM CONTENT

84

 

5.     ADVANCED CURRICULUM CONTENT

86

ACCREDITATION STANDARDS

 

 

 

1.     PROGRAM MISSION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES

87

 

2.     CURRICULUM

87

 

3.     PROGRAM GOVERNANCE, ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE,

  AND RESOURCES

88

 

4.     FACULTY

90

 

5.     STUDENT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

90

 

6.     NONDISCRIMINATION AND HUMAN DIVERSITY

91

 

7.     PROGRAM RENEWAL

91

 

8.     PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AND CONTINUOUS

        IMPROVEMENT

92

PROGRAM CHANGES

 

93


 

PREAMBLE

Social work practice promotes human well-being by strengthening opportunities, resources, and capacities of people in their environments and by creating policies and services to correct conditions that limit human rights and the quality of life. The social work profession works to eliminate poverty, discrimination, and oppression. Guided by a person-in-environment perspective and respect for human diversity, the profession works to effect social and economic justice worldwide.

Social work education combines scientific inquiry with the teaching of professional skills to provide effective and ethical social work services. Social work educators reflect their identification with the profession through their teaching, scholarship, and service. Social work education, from baccalaureate to doctoral levels, employs educational, practice, scholarly, interprofessional, and service delivery models to orient and shape the professionís future in the context of expanding knowledge, changing technologies, and complex human and social concerns.

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) promotes academic excellence in baccalaureate and masterís social work education. The EPAS specifies the curricular content and educational context to prepare students for professional social work practice. The EPAS sets forth basic requirements for these purposes. Beyond these basic requirements of EPAS, individual programs focus on areas relevant to their institutional and program mission, goals, and objectives.

The EPAS permits programs to use time-tested and new models of program design, implementation, and evaluation. It does so by balancing requirements that promote comparability across programs with a level of flexibility that encourages programs to respond to changing human, professional, and institutional needs.

The EPAS focuses on assessing the results of a programís development and its continuous improvement.  While accreditation is ultimately evaluative, in social work education it is based on a consultative and collaborative process that determines whether a program meets the requirements of the EPAS.


 

FUNCTIONS OF EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND ACCREDITATION

1. Educational Policy

The Educational Policy promotes excellence, creativity, and innovation in social work education and practice. It sets forth required content areas that relate to each other and to the purposes, knowledge, and values of the profession. Programs of social work education are offered at the baccalaureate, masterís, and doctoral levels. Baccalaureate and masterís programs are accredited by CSWE. This document supersedes all prior statements of curriculum policy for baccalaureate and masterís program levels.

2. Accreditation

Accreditation ensures that the quality of professional programs merits public confidence. The Accreditation Standards establish basic requirements for baccalaureate and masterís levels.  Accreditation Standards pertain to the following program elements:

ē Mission, goals, and objectives

ē Curriculum

ē Governance, structure, and resources

ē Faculty

ē Student professional development

ē Nondiscrimination and human diversity

ē Program renewal

ē Program assessment and continuous improvement


 

3. Relationship of Educational Policy to Accreditation

CSWE uses the EPAS for the accreditation of social work programs. The Educational Policy and the Accreditation Standards are conceptually integrated. Programs use Educational Policy, Section 1 as one important basis for developing program mission, goals, and objectives. Programs use Educational Policy, Section 3 to develop program objectives and Educational Policy, Sections 4 and 5 to develop content for demonstrating attainment of the objectives. The accreditation process reviews the programís self-study document, site team report, and program response to determine compliance with the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Accredited programs meet all standards.


EDUCATIONAL POLICY

1.         PURPOSES

1.0             Purposes of the Social Work Profession

The social work profession receives its sanction from public and private auspices and is the primary profession in the development, provision, and evaluation of social services. Professional social workers are leaders in a variety of organizational settings and service delivery systems within a global context.

 

The profession of social work is based on the values of service, social and economic justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, and integrity and competence in practice. With these values as defining principles, the purposes of social work are:

        To enhance human well-being and alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of  social injustice.

        To enhance the social functioning and interactions of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities by involving them in accomplishing goals, developing resources, and preventing and alleviating distress.

        To formulate and implement social policies, services, and programs that meet basic human needs and support the development of human capacities.

        To pursue policies, services, and resources through advocacy and social or political actions that promote social and economic justice.

        To develop and use research, knowledge, and skills that advance social work practice.

        To develop and apply practice in the context of diverse cultures.

1.1 Purposes of Social Work Education

The purposes of social work education are to prepare competent and effective professionals, to develop social work knowledge, and to provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems. Social work education is grounded in the professionís history, purposes, and philosophy and is based on a body of knowledge, values, and skills. Social work education enables students to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work profession for competent practice.


 

1.2.            Achievement of Purposes

Among its programs, which vary in design, structure, and objectives, social work education achieves these purposes through such means as:

         Providing curricula and teaching practices at the forefront of the new and changing knowledge base of social work and related disciplines.

         Providing curricula that build on a liberal arts perspective to promote breadth of knowledge, critical thinking, and communication skills.

         Developing knowledge.

         Developing and applying instructional and practice-relevant technology.

         Maintaining reciprocal relationships with social work practitioners, groups, organizations, and communities.

         Promoting continual professional development of students, faculty, and practitioners.

         Promoting interprofessional and interdisciplinary collaboration.

         Preparing social workers to engage in prevention activities that promote well-being.

         Preparing social workers to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

         Preparing social workers to evaluate the processes and effectiveness of practice.

         Preparing social workers to practice without discrimination, with respect, and with knowledge and skills related to clientsí age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

         Preparing social workers to alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of social injustice.

         Preparing social workers to recognize the global context of social work practice.

         Preparing social workers to formulate and influence social policies and social work services in diverse political contexts.


 

2. STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

2.0       Structure

Baccalaureate and graduate social work education programs operate under the auspices of accredited colleges and universities. These educational institutions vary by auspices, emphasis, and size. With diverse strengths, missions, and resources, social work education programs share a common commitment to educate competent, ethical social workers.

The baccalaureate and masterís levels of social work education are anchored in the purposes of the social work profession and promote the knowledge, values, and skills of the profession.  Baccalaureate social work education programs prepare graduates for generalist professional practice. Masterís social work education programs prepare graduates for advanced professional practice in an area of concentration. The baccalaureate and masterís levels of educational preparation are differentiated according to (a) conceptualization and design, (b) content, (c) program objectives, and (d) depth, breadth, and specificity of knowledge and skills. Frameworks and perspectives for concentration include fields of practice, problem areas, intervention methods, and practice contexts and perspectives.

Programs develop their mission and goals within the purposes of the profession, the purposes of social work education, and their institutional context. Programs also recognize academic content and professional experiences that students bring to the educational program. A conceptual framework, built upon relevant theories and knowledge, shapes the breadth and depth of knowledge and practice skills to be acquired.

2.1       Program Renewal

Social work education remains vital, relevant, and progressive by pursuing exchanges with the practice community and program stakeholders and by developing and assessing new knowledge and technology.

3.         PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Social work education is grounded in the liberal arts and contains a coherent, integrated professional foundation in social work. The graduate advanced curriculum is built from the professional foundation.  Graduates of baccalaureate and masterís social work programs demonstrate the capacity to meet the foundation objectives and objectives unique to the program. Graduates of masterís social work programs also demonstrate the capacity to meet advanced program objectives.


 

3.0       Foundation Program Objectives

The professional foundation, which is essential to the practice of any social worker, includes, but is not limited to, the following program objectives. Graduates demonstrate the ability to:

1.         Apply critical thinking skills within the context of professional social work practice.

2.         Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards and principles, and practice accordingly.

3.         Practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to clientsí age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

4.         Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and apply strategies of advocacy and social change that advance social and economic justice.

5.         Understand and interpret the history of the social work profession and its contemporary structures and issues.

B6.       Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice with systems of all sizes.1

M6.      Apply the knowledge and skills of a generalist social work perspective to practice with systems of all sizes.

7.         Use theoretical frameworks supported by empirical evidence to understand individual development and behavior across the life span and the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.

8.         Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies.

9.         Evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and evaluate their own practice interventions.

10.       Use communication skills differentially across client populations, colleagues, and communities.

11.       Use supervision and consultation appropriate to social work practice.

12.       Function within the structure of organizations and service delivery systems and seek necessary organizational change.

_____________________________________________________________________

1 Items preceded by a B or M apply only to baccalaureate or masterís programs, respectively.


 

3.1       Concentration Objectives

Graduates of a masterís social work program are advanced practitioners who apply the knowledge and skills of advanced social work practice in an area of concentration. They analyze, intervene, and evaluate in ways that are highly differentiated, discriminating, and self-critical.  Graduates synthesize and apply a broad range of knowledge and skills with a high degree of autonomy and proficiency. They refine and advance the quality of their practice and that of the larger social work profession.

3.2       Additional Program Objectives

A program may develop additional objectives to cover the required content in relation to its particular mission, goals, and educational level.

4.         FOUNDATION CURRICULUM CONTENT

All social work programs provide foundation content in the areas specified below. Content areas may be combined and delivered with a variety of instructional technologies. Content is relevant to the mission, goals, and objectives of the program and to the purposes, values, and ethics of the social work profession.

4.0 Values and Ethics

Social work education programs integrate content about values and principles of ethical decision making as presented in the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. The educational experience provides students with the opportunity to be aware of personal values; develop, demonstrate, and promote the values of the profession; and analyze ethical dilemmas and the ways in which these affect practice, services, and clients.

4.1       Diversity

Social work programs integrate content that promotes understanding, affirmation, and respect for people from diverse backgrounds. The content emphasizes the interlocking and complex nature of culture and personal identity. It ensures that social services meet the needs of groups served and are culturally relevant. Programs educate students to recognize diversity within and between groups that may influence assessment, planning, intervention, and research.  Students learn how to define, design, and implement strategies for effective practice with persons from diverse backgrounds.


4.2       Populations-at-Risk and Social and Economic Justice

Social work education programs integrate content on populations-at-risk, examining the factors that contribute to and constitute being at risk. Programs educate students to identify how group membership influences access to resources, and present content on the dynamics of such risk factors and responsive and productive strategies to redress them. 

Programs integrate social and economic justice content grounded in an understanding of distributive justice, human and civil rights, and the global interconnections of oppression. Programs provide content related to implementing strategies to combat discrimination, oppression, and economic deprivation and to promote social and economic justice. Programs prepare students to advocate for nondiscriminatory social and economic systems.

4.3       Human Behavior and the Social Environment

Social work education programs provide content on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. Content includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and among individuals, groups, societies, and economic systems. It includes theories and knowledge of biological, sociological, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development across the life span; the range of social systems in which people live (individual, family, group, organizational, and community); and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being.

4.4       Social Welfare Policy and Services

Programs provide content about the history of social work, the history and current structures of social welfare services, and the role of policy in service delivery, social work practice, and attainment of individual and social well-being. Course content provides students with knowledge and skills to understand major policies that form the foundation of social welfare; analyze organizational, local, state, national, and international issues in social welfare policy and social service delivery; analyze and apply the results of policy research relevant to social service delivery; understand and demonstrate policy practice skills in regard to economic, political, and organizational systems, and use them to influence, formulate, and advocate for policy consistent with social work values; and identify financial, organizational, administrative, and planning processes required to deliver social services.

4.5       Social Work Practice

Social work practice content is anchored in the purposes of the social work profession and focuses on strengths, capacities, and resources of client systems in relation to their broader environments. Students learn practice content that encompasses knowledge and skills to work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. This content includes engaging clients in an appropriate working relationship, identifying issues, problems, needs, resources, and assets; collecting and assessing information; and planning for service delivery.  It includes using communication skills, supervision, and consultation. Practice content also includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing empirically based interventions designed to achieve client goals; applying empirical knowledge and technological advances; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; developing, analyzing, advocating, and providing leadership for policies and services; and promoting social and economic justice.

 

4.6       Research

Qualitative and quantitative research content provides understanding of a scientific, analytic, and ethical approach to building knowledge for practice. The content prepares students to develop, use, and effectively communicate empirically based knowledge, including evidence based interventions. Research knowledge is used by students to provide high-quality services; to initiate change; to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery; and to evaluate their own practice.

4.7       Field Education

Field education is an integral component of social work education anchored in the mission, goals, and educational level of the program. It occurs in settings that reinforce studentsí identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the profession; fosters the integration of empirical and practice-based knowledge; and promotes the development of professional competence. Field education is systematically designed, supervised, coordinated, and evaluated on the basis of criteria by which students demonstrate the achievement of program objectives.

5.  ADVANCED CURRICULUM CONTENT

The masterís curriculum prepares graduates for advanced social work practice in an area of concentration. Using a conceptual framework to identify advanced knowledge and skills, programs build an advanced curriculum from the foundation content. In the advanced curriculum, the foundation content areas (Section 4, 4.0–4.7) are addressed in greater depth, breadth, and specificity and support the programís conception of advanced practice.


 

ACCREDITATION STANDARDS

1.         Program Mission, Goals, and Objectives

1.0       The social work program has a mission appropriate to professional social work education as defined in Educational Policy, Section 1.1. The programís mission is appropriate to the level or levels for which it is preparing students for practice and is consistent with the institutionís mission.

1.1       The program has goals derived from its mission. These goals reflect the purposes of the Educational Policy, Section 1.1. Program goals are not limited to these purposes.

1.2       The program has objectives that are derived from the program goals. These objectives are consistent with Educational Policy, Section 3. Program objectives are reflected in program implementation and continuous assessment (see Accreditation Standard 8).

1.3       The program makes its constituencies aware of its mission, goals, and objectives.

2.   Curriculum

2.0       The curriculum is developed and organized as a coherent and integrated whole consistent with program goals and objectives. Social work education is grounded in the liberal arts and contains a coherent, integrated professional foundation in social work practice from which an advanced practice curriculum is built at the graduate level.

B2.0.1        The program defines its conception of generalist social work practice, describes its coverage of the professional foundation curriculum identified in Educational Policy, Section 4, and demonstrates how its conception of generalist practice is implemented in all components of the professional curriculum.

M2.0.1       The program describes its coverage of the foundation and advanced curriculum content, identified in Educational Policy, Sections 4 and 5. The program defines its conception of advanced practice and explains how the advanced curriculum is built from the professional foundation. The masterís program has a concentration curriculum that includes (a) concentration objectives, (b) a conceptual framework built on relevant theories, (c) curriculum design and content, and (d) field education that supports the advanced curriculum. The program demonstrates how the depth, breadth, and specificity of the advanced curriculum are addressed in relation to the professional foundation.


 

2.1       The social work program administers field education (Educational Policy, Section 4.7 and Section 5) consistent with program goals and objectives that:

2.1.1      Provides for a minimum of 400 hours of field education for baccalaureate programs and 900 hours for masterís programs.

2.1.2      Admits only those students who have met the programís specified criteria for field education.

2.1.3      Specifies policies, criteria, and procedures for selecting agencies and field instructors; placing and monitoring students; maintaining field liaison contacts with agencies; and evaluating student learning and agency effectiveness in providing field instruction.

2.1.4      Specifies that field instructors for baccalaureate students hold a CSWE-accredited baccalaureate or masterís social work degree.2  Field instructors for masterís students hold a CSWE-accredited masterís social work degree. In programs where a field instructor does not hold a CSWE-accredited baccalaureate or masterís social work degree, the program assumes responsibility for reinforcing a social work perspective.

2.1.5      Provides orientation, field instruction training, and continuing dialog with agencies and field instructors.

2.1.6    Develops policies regarding field placements in an agency in which the student is also employed. Student assignments and field education supervision differ from those associated with the studentís employment.

3.         Program Governance, Administrative Structure, and Resources

3.0           The social work program has the necessary autonomy and administrative structure to achieve its goals and objectives (Educational Policy, Section 2.0).

3.0.1      The social work faculty defines program curriculum consistent with the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards and the institutionís policies.

3.0.2      The administration and faculty of the social work program participate in formulating and implementing policies related to the recruitment, hiring, retention, promotion, and tenure of program personnel.

 

 

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2 This and all future references to ďCSWE-accredited baccalaureate or masterís social work degreeĒ include degrees from CSWE-accredited programs or programs approved by its Foreign Equivalency Determination Service.


 

3.0.3      The chief administrator of the social work program has either a CSWE-accredited masterís social work degree, with a doctoral degree preferred, or a professional degree in social work from a CSWE-accredited program and a doctoral degree.  The chief administrator also has demonstrated leadership ability through teaching, scholarship, curriculum development, administrative experience, and other academic and professional activities in the field of social work.

3.0.4      The chief administrator of the social work program has a full-time appointment to the program and sufficient assigned time (at least 25% for baccalaureate programs and 50% for masterís programs) to provide educational and administrative leadership.  Combined programs designate a social work faculty member and assign this person sufficient time to administer the baccalaureate social work program.

3.0.5      The field education director has a masterís degree in social work from a CSWE accredited program and at least two years post–baccalaureate or post–masterís social work degree practice experience.

3.0.6      The field education director has a full-time appointment to the program and sufficient assigned time (at least 25% for baccalaureate programs and 50% for masterís programs) to provide educational and administrative leadership for field education.

3.1           The social work program has sufficient resources to achieve program goals and objectives.

3.1.1      The program has sufficient support staff, other personnel, and technological resources to support program functioning.

3.1.2      The program has sufficient and stable financial supports that permit program planning and achievement of program goals and objectives. These include a budgetary allocation and procedures for budget development and administration.

3.1.3      The program has comprehensive library holdings and electronic access, as well as other informational and educational resources necessary for achieving the programís goals and objectives.

3.1.4      The program has sufficient office and classroom space, computer-mediated access, or both to achieve the programís goals and objectives.

3.1.5    The program has access to assistive technology, including materials in alternative formats (such as Braille, large print, books on tape, assistive learning systems).


4.         Faculty

4.0       The program has full-time faculty, which may be augmented by part-time faculty, with the qualifications, competence, and range of expertise in social work education and practice to achieve its goals and objectives. The program has a sufficient full-time equivalent faculty-to student ratio (usually 1:25 for baccalaureate programs and 1:12 for masterís programs) to carry out ongoing functions of the program.

4.1       The program demonstrates how the use of part-time faculty assists in the achievement of the programís goals and objectives.

4.2       Faculty size is commensurate with the number and type of curricular offerings in class and field; class size; number of students; and the facultyís teaching, scholarly, and service responsibilities.

B4.2.1              The baccalaureate social work program has a minimum of two full-time faculty with masterís social work degrees from a CSWE-accredited program, with full-time appointment in social work, and whose principal assignment is to the baccalaureate program. It is preferred that faculty have a doctoral degree.

M4.2.1             The masterís social work program has a minimum of six full-time faculty with masterís social work degrees from a CSWE-accredited program and whose principal assignment is to the masterís program. The majority of the full-time masterís social work program faculty have a masterís degree in social work and a doctoral degree.

4.3       Faculty who teach required practice courses have a masterís social work degree from a CSWE-accredited program and at least two years post–baccalaureate or post–masterís social work degree practice experience.

4.4       The program has a faculty workload policy that supports the achievement of institutional priorities and the programís goals and objectives.

5.         Student Professional Development

5.0       The program has admissions criteria and procedures that reflect the programís goals and objectives.

M5.1    Only candidates who have earned a bachelorís degree are admitted to the masterís social work degree program.

5.2       The program has a written policy indicating that it does not grant social work course credit for life experience or previous work experience.

5.3       In those foundation curriculum areas where students demonstrate required knowledge and skills, the program describes how it ensures that students do not repeat that content.


 

5.3.1      The program has written policies and procedures concerning the transfer of credits.

M5.3.2             Advanced standing status is only awarded to graduates of baccalaureate social work programs accredited by CSWE.

5.4       The program has academic and professional advising policies and procedures that are consistent with the programís goals and objectives. Professional advising is provided by social work program faculty, staff, or both.

5.5       The program has policies and procedures specifying studentsí rights and responsibilities to participate in formulating and modifying policies affecting academic and student affairs. It provides opportunities and encourages students to organize in their interests.

5.6       The program informs students of its criteria for evaluating their academic and professional performance.

5.7       The program has policies and procedures for terminating a studentís enrollment in the social work program for reasons of academic and professional performance.

6.         Nondiscrimination and Human Diversity

6.0       The program makes specific and continuous efforts to provide a learning context in which respect for all persons and understanding of diversity (including age, class, color, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation) are practiced. Social work education builds upon professional purposes and values; therefore, the program provides a learning context that is nondiscriminatory and reflects the professionís fundamental tenets. The program describes how its learning context and educational program (including faculty, staff, and student composition; selection of agencies and their clientele as field education settings; composition of program advisory or field committees; resource allocation; program leadership; speakers series, seminars, and special programs; research and other initiatives) and its curriculum model understanding of and respect for diversity.

7.         Program Renewal

7.0       The program has ongoing exchanges with external constituencies that may include social work practitioners, social service recipients, advocacy groups, social service agencies, professional associations, regulatory agencies, the academic community, and the community at large.

7.1       The programís faculty engage in the development and dissemination of research, scholarship, or other creative activities relevant to the profession.

7.2       The program seeks opportunities for innovation and provides leadership within the profession and the academic community.


 

8.         Program Assessment and Continuous Improvement

8.0       The program has an assessment plan and procedures for evaluating the outcome of each program objective. The plan specifies the measurement procedures and methods used to evaluate the outcome of each program objective.

8.1       The program implements its plan to evaluate the outcome of each program objective and shows evidence that the analysis is used continuously to affirm and improve the educational program.


 

PROGRAM CHANGES

The EPAS supports change necessary to improve the educational quality of a program in relation to its goals and objectives. The EPAS recognizes that such change is ongoing. When a program is granted initial accreditation or its accreditation is reaffirmed, the program is, by that action, accredited only at the level or levels and for the components that existed and were reviewed at the time of that action. Prior to the next scheduled accreditation review, changes may take place within the program.  Although it is not necessary to report minor changes, programs notify the Commission on Accreditation (COA) of such changes as new leadership, governance, structure, off-campus programs, etc. Depending on the nature of the change, the COA may request additional information. Prior to the implementation of a substantive change the program submits a proposal and receives approval. Substantive changes are defined as those that require a waiver of one or more aspects of EPAS.

 


UMD-MSW FIELD PROGRAM

Advanced Generalist Curriculum Model

 

SAMPLE TASKS FOR MSW FIELD PLACEMENTS

Students should have the opportunity to learn skills at all three levels in Field I & II. Generalist practice skills are emphasized in Field I and advanced generalist practice skills in Field II.

     

Direct Social Work With Individuals, Groups and Families              

Interviewing                                              Advocating

Interpersonal relations                                    Case management

Case assessment/planning                         Brokering

Intervention plan/implementation                  Crisis handler

Case evaluation/recording                         Mediating/negotiating

Counseling                                                Teaching   

Therapy Groups  

 

Social Work With Organizations       

Agency planning                                 Program evaluation/data analysis

Organizing programs                           Leading/problem-solving

Public Relations                                  Staff support services to committees/Boards

Budgeting                                            Grant writing

                        In-service trainings                              Supervision

                        Fund raising                                        Report writing

 

Community Social Work Practice      

Community planning                          Grant writing

Community organizing                       Fund raising

Leading/problem-solving                     Community needs assessments

Community data analysis                   Community education   

                        Advocacy for client groups                Legislative advocacy

                        Report writing/position statements    Social policy research & development

Legislative Action                               Multi-disciplinary teams

                        Participating member of task force

Provides staff support services to task force

Social Work with Task Groups, Governmental & Non-Profit Boards

 

Revised 4/6/2010