umd

EdSe 4501/5501: Education Psychology | Spring 2017

 

Welcome to Education Psychology: EdSe 4501/5501

Instructor

Dan Glisczinski, Associate Professor, Doctor of Education

Class times

Section 1: Tuesdays, Thursdays 2-3:15 in EduE 16

Office hours

Tuesdays 10-12, Thursdays 9-10 in EduE 119

Google course groups

edse4501_001s17d@d.umn.edu

edse5501_001s17d@d.umn.edu


girl at school boy at school students in motion

Course description


EdSe 4501 investigates emerging and established research-based insights from the field of education neuroscience as it informs the art and science of learning. Course projects challenge and support teacher candidates with using these insights to design meaningful learning experiences for secondary students. Course activities tend to be inquiry-based, are generally Socratic, and are shaped by an appreciation for whole-brained experiential learning. Success in the course is less about earning an A grade than developing capacities, processes, and insights to scaffold profound learning experiences for 21st century secondary students.
This course is founded upon a firm commitment to the University of Minnesota Duluth's Learner Sensitive Teacher Model, which asserts that empowerment is what teachers enable when they get themselves out of the way, collaboration produces broader perspectives, reflection guides right action, social justice is a human imperative, and technology is a tool in service of educational and life discovery.

Required (purchase these in hard copy or e-book versions, as we'll issue iPads to block one candidates this semester)

Medina, J. (2008). Brain rules: 12 Principles for surviving and thriving at work, home, and school. Seattle: Pear.

Sousa, D. (2010). Mind, brain, and education: Neuroscience implications for the classroom. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree/Leading Edge.


Zull, J. (2002). The art of changing the brain: Enriching the practice of teaching by exploring the biology of learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Regular online readings--as noted on our electronic class schedule

Recommended

Zull (2011). From brain to mnd: Using neuroscience to guide change in education. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Minnesota Standards of Effective Practice (SEP) and Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards

Standard 1: Subject Matter
Standard 2: Student Learning
Standard 3: Diverse Learners
Standard 4: Instructional Strategies
Standard 5: Learning Environment
Standard 6: Communication
Standard 7: Planning Instruction
Standard 8: Assessment
Standard 9: Reflection
Standard 10: Collaboration, Relationships

Department of Education Conceptual Framework

Social Justice (S)
Reflection (R)
Empowerment (E)
Technology (T)
Collaboration (C)

Minnesota Standards of Effective Practice (SEPs) assigned to this course

Standard 2: Student Learning

Subp. 3.  A teacher must understand how students learn and develop and must provide learning opportunities that support a student's intellectual, social, and personal development. The teacher must:

3A. - understand how students internalize knowledge, acquire skills, and develop thinking behaviors, and know how to use instructional strategies that promote student learning;

EDSE 4501 - Topic: EDSE 4501 - Topic: Sparking cognition through emotion, motion, and elaborative encoding. Readings: Reynolds (2013) How to build a better brain; Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010) The role of emotion and skilled intuition in learning; Doidge (2008) The culturally modified brain. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Apply themes to curriculum design through backward designed lesson plan.

3B. - understand that a student's physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development influence learning and know how to address these factors when making instructional decisions;

EDSE 4501 - Topic: Differentiating learning. Readings: Restak (2008) How to build a better brain; Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010) The role of emotion and skilled intuition in learning; Doidge (2008) The culturally modified brain. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Apply themes to curriculum design through backward designed lesson plan

3C. - understand developmental progressions of learners and ranges of individual variation within the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive domains, be able to identify levels of readiness in learning, and understand how development in any one domain may affect performance in others;

Topic: Differentiated learning in secondary schools. Readings: Ratey (2008), Medina (2015), and Reynolds (2014) on movement fueling brain function; Goleman (2012), Zull, 2011), and Heath & Heath (2010) on the role of socio emotional cognition; Posner (2010), Willis (2010), and Sousa (2010) on cognitive development.  Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning.

3D. - use a student's strengths as a basis for growth, and a student's errors as opportunities for learning;

Topic: Differentiated learning in secondary schools. Readings: Ratey (2008), Medina (2015), and Reynolds (2014) on movement fueling brain function; Goleman (2012), Zull, 2011), and Heath & Heath (2010) on the role of socio emotional cognition; Posner (2010), Willis (2010), and Sousa (2010) on cognitive development.  Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning.

Standard 3: Diverse Learners

Subp. 4.  A teacher must understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to students with diverse backgrounds and exceptionalities. The teacher must:

4A. - understand and identify differences in approaches to learning and performance, including varied learning styles and performance modes and multiple intelligences; and know how to design instruction that uses a student's strengths as the basis for continued learning;

Topic: Differentiated learning in secondary schools. Readings: Gardner (2006) on multiple intelligences; Achor (2014) on positive psychology; Shiv (2009) on the frinky science of human motivation; Maslow (1946) on a theory of human needs.; Mazur (2011) on the correlations between active learning and mastery. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning. Backward design curriculum using students' strengths as a basis for continued learning.

4I. - understand that all students can and should learn at the highest possible levels and persist in helping all students achieve success;

EDSE 4501 - Topic: Differentiated learning in secondary schools. Readings: Gardner (2006) on multiple intelligences; Achor (2014) on positive psychology; Shiv (2009) on the frinky science of human motivation; Maslow (1946) on a theory of human needs.; Mazur (2011) on the correlations between active learning and mastery. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning. Backward design curriculum using students' strengths as a basis for continued learning.

Standard 4: Instructional Strategies

Subp. 5.  A teacher must understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage student development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. The teacher must:

5B. - understand the cognitive processes associated with various kinds of learning and how these processes can be stimulated;

Topic: Scaffolding cognitive development. Readings: Gardner (2006) on multiple intelligences; Zull (2002) on brain regions and functions; Posner (2010), Sousa (2010), Medina (2008) on neurons, dendrites, axons, synapses, and neuro transmitters; Doidge (2008), Begley (2008) on neuroplasticity. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning. Backward design curriculum to stimulate cognitive processes.

5G. - use multiple teaching and learning strategies to engage students in active learning opportunities that promote the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance capabilities and that help students assume responsibility for identifying and using learning resources;

Backward designing a balanced-brain learning cycle. Readings: Zull (2012) balanced brained cycles of learning.  Assessed: Backward design neuro-educationally supported curriculum featuring a cycle of sensing, associating, analyzing, and constructing.

5I. - vary the instructional process to address the content and purposes of instruction and the needs of students;

Topic: Differentiated learning in secondary schools. Readings: Gardner (2006) on multiple intelligences; Achor (2014) on positive psychology; Shiv (2009) on the frinky science of human motivation; Maslow (1946) on a theory of human needs.; Mazur (2011) on the correlations between active learning and mastery. Assessed: Synthesize emerging research themes that shape real and meaningful 21st century learning. Identify successes and suggest curricular developments for select students in secondary education case study of differentiated learning. Backward design curriculum using students' strengths as a basis for continued learning.

Standard 5: Learning Environment

Subp. 6.  A teacher must be able to use an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create learning environments that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. The teacher must:

6A. - understand human motivation and behavior and draw from the foundational sciences of psychology, anthropology, and sociology to develop strategies for organizing and supporting individual and group work;

Topic: Theories of human motivation including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), and Sinek (2014); Assessed: Backward design curriculum using students' partnerships for scaffolds, collaboration, and knowledge construction.

6B. - understand how social groups function and influence people, and how people influence groups;

Topic: Theories of human motivation including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), and Sinek (2014); Assessed: Backward design curriculum using students' partnerships for scaffolds, collaboration, and knowledge construction.

6D. - know how to help people work productively and cooperatively with each other in complex social settings;

EDSE 4501 - Topic: Socio-cognitive development via Medina (2008) and Zull (2012) and theories of motivation including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), and Sinek (2014); Assessed: Backward design curriculum using students' partnerships for scaffolds, collaboration, and knowledge construction.

6E. - understand the principles of effective classroom management and use a range of strategies to promote positive relationships, cooperation, and purposeful learning in the classroom;

Topic: Socio-cognitive development via Medina (2008) and Zull (2012) and theories of motivation including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), and Sinek (2014); Assessed: Backward design curriculum using students' partnerships for scaffolds, collaboration, and knowledge construction.

6F. - know factors and situations that are likely to promote or diminish intrinsic motivation and how to help students become self-motivated;

EDSE 4501 - Topic: Theories of human motivation and emotionally relevant learning including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), Sinek (2014), Zull (2002 & 2012); Medina (2015), Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010). Assessed: Case study of differentiation and related factors scaffolding motivation.

6G. - understand how participation supports commitment;

Topic: Theories of human motivation and emotionally relevant learning including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), Sinek (2014), Zull (2002 & 2012); Medina (2015), Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010). Assessed: Case study of differentiation and related factors scaffolding motivation.

6J. - recognize the relationship of intrinsic motivation to student lifelong growth and learning;

Topic: Theories of human motivation and emotionally relevant learning including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), Sinek (2014), Zull (2002 & 2012); Medina (2015), Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010). Assessed: Case study of differentiation and related factors scaffolding motivation.

6K. - use different motivational strategies that are likely to encourage continuous development of individual learner abilities;

Topic: Socio-cognitive development and differentiated learning via Medina (2008) and Zull (2012) and theories of motivation including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), and Sinek (2014); 
Assessed: Backward design of differentiated curriculum using students' partnerships for scaffolds, collaboration, and knowledge construction. 

6R. - organize, prepare students for, and monitor independent and group work that allows for full, varied, and effective participation of all individuals.

Topic: Theories of human motivation and emotionally relevant learning including Maslow (1946), Shiv (2009), Heath & Heath (2008), Doidge (2008), Sinek (2014), Zull (2002 & 2012); Medina (2015), Immordino-Yang & Faeth (2010). Assessed: Case study of differentiation and related factors scaffolding motivation.  

10C. - understand the influences of the teacher's behavior on student growth and learning;

Understanding the influences of teacher behavior on student growth and learning is identified as major theme in the first, second, and final course unit readings, discussions, and projects including explaining major themes in educational neuroscience, applying these in contexts of differentiation, and backward designing curriculum to scaffold growth and learning for all students.

11D. - understand the concept of addressing the needs of the whole learner;

Topic: Multiple domains of learning and development including cognitive, affective, and physical taken from every reading throughout course. Assessment: Final backward design curriculum explained in terms of meeting the needs of the whole learner as expressed through research from educational neuroscience.

Content-area SEPS

3. How to apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of preadolescents and adolescents

4. How to apply the research base for the best practices of middle level learners

Assessment and Course Grades

Course grades will be earned based upon completion of projects 1-3. Satisfactory completion of all projects is required for course credit.

 

Passable/C range

Quality/B range

Exceptional/A range

Describing learning

reiterating portions of research on learning

identifying accurate and specific explanations
of major themes in neuro education research

explicating a connected relationship between major neuro education themes and synergetic findings on the science of differentiation in light of multiple, accurate research sources for each assertion

Designing learning

adding interaction opportunities to a teaching-centered curriculum

leading students to experience, reflect, analyze, and create

constructing multiple opportunities for students to make decisions about experiences, meaning making, critical thinking, and implementing curriculum objectives with learning in their own lives

Dispositions

Dispositions qualities of mind and behavior--required of teachers include the following descriptors. This course will support and assess you in demonstrating these effectively. Punctual attendance, initiative, reliability, written and oral expression, critical thinking, tact, collegiality, reflective response to feedback, interaction with students, teachers, and stakeholders, desire to improve teaching performance, commitment to the profession, constructive attitudes toward learners, professional ethics and demeanor.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is ugly and is regarded as a serious offense by all members of the academic community. According to university policy, it can result in your expulsion from UMD.

College of Education and Human Service Professions Grievance Policy

Please review grievance policy for your information.

Attendance expectations Assessment and Course Grades

Course grades will be earned based upon completion of projects 1-3. Satisfactory completion of all projects is required for course credit.

Attendance is expected at all classes--except in the case of an emergency. Please sign in at each meeting. If you will miss class, please notify me in advance by email at dglisczi@d.umn.edu. If you miss more than two class meetings, you may be required to retake this course.

Teaching & Learning: Instructor and Student Responsibilities

UMD is committed to providing a positive, safe, and inclusive place for all who study and work here. Instructors and students have mutual responsibility to insure that the environment in all of these settings supports teaching and learning, is respectful of the rights and freedoms of all members, and promotes a civil and open exchange of ideas.

Student Conduct Code

Appropriate classroom conduct promotes an environment of academic achievement and integrity. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor's ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. Student are expected adhere to Board of Regents Policy: Student Conduct Code

Course modifications

This syllabus is an outline of this course as designed. When appropriate, readings, projects, and dates may change as needed throughout the semester.

Invitation

I invite any of you who have any disability, either permanent or temporary, or any other special circumstances that might affect your ability to perform in this class to inform me so that together we can adapt methods, materials, or assignments as needed to provide equitable participation.

 


"Timshel; thou mayest"
Steinbeck (1952)