ongoing PDF

zeroed writing

(LB writing, authors; omments; email dialogues, URLs, PDFs, TRFs)

1964

sound sculpture, Terrain Instriments

Circulation Trilogy: terrain instruments Leif Brush perpetual linkages, ongoing aural and imaging updates

1964-1969: snowflakes seeing the wind soundsculpture cortextual memory resources smilemeasuring device


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MAY/JUNE/ July, 1972 SAIC NEWSLETTER
NEW TEACH: ELECTRONICS & KINETICS
Sister areas include Video, Sound, Film, Design,
Communication, and Generative Systems

Leif Brush: TERRAIN INSTRUMENTS
by Gloria DeFilipps Brush

Leif Brush, in his Terrain Instruments outdoor installation series, is working with sound as a simultaneous adjunct to form, seeking and orchestrating actual natural forces rather than simply physically replicating them or synthesizing artificial sources. He uses outdoor space as the context for his constructions which electronically monitor and acoustically orchestrate tree dynamics, wind, snow, sleet, rain and other natural phenomena. Most of the current structures consist of weavings and meshings in air space of a variety of types and gauges of tuneable brass, steel and copper wire strandage, tubing and wire ribbons suspended carefully between tree clusters. To this point, his "Voltages from Nature" sound recordings have been nade using limited crystals and magnetic transducers to sense atmospheric vibrational activity occurring on the wires. The Terrain Instruments are not scaled- up versions of existing musical instruments, but an expression of new research into form and sound.
The Art Institute school roof was the site, in 1969, of one of his earliest experimental installations. For the 1970 Fellowship Show, in which he was awarded the Anna Louis Raymond Fellowship, he installed a half-hexagram section in Gunsaulus Hall, borrowing fans from classrooms to simulate indoor wind. In the 1972 exhibition, he received the Art Sales and Rental Gallery Fellowship for his work with the Meadow Piano, and for a series of collages which focused on his increasing interest in global information gathering and processing systems and the interactions and poetics of weather. While a graduate student, he was appointed a Teaching Assistantship to develop and offer the Audible Constructs program on a teaching schedule of six hours weekly. Concerned equally with both technology and ideas, the classes introduced sound as an autonomous art form, and also explored, according the interests of the students, ways in which could could work with the visual media.
On leaving SAIC in 1972, he was hired as an Assistant Professor in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Iowa-Iowa City. A national Endowment for the Arts project grant allowed acquisition, in 1973, of professional quality recording equipment, and construction of new prototypes in the Iowa landscape. Working with physisists, computer scientists, structural and electrical engineers and music and art students with a Lindquist Center fellowship, he developed a proposal for an interactive, generative public-use sculpture, the Riverharps, which used natural forces as direct resources for sound orchestration.
In Fall, 1976 Leif assumed leadership of the sculptural area at the University of Minnesota, Duluth Campus. Locating on Lake Superior's northeastern shore has provided excellent new opportunities for working with the environment.
A new tape presented as part of the "Imported Sources" performance in the February Performance/Midway series at the University of Chicago achieved the unification, through sound, of forest constructions and a spatial configuration which monitored shifts and stresses in the Meany ice shelf on Lake Superior. The Minnesota State Arts Board has just awarded Leif one of its comparatively rare individual artist's grants for construction of a new Terrain Instrument which, using more sensitive and diverse sensors and strain gauges to elicit sound from minute temperature variations, will provide new possibilities for more complex orchestrations and playings. A hoped for L.E.D. transmitter and receiver link may eventually allow more direct mixing of audio from several acoustically-different environments, and his current plans include documentation using new sensors to enhance the range of the available natural "sound vocabulary:" prior to new constructions and orchestrations. This identification process would necessarily take into account the variables of seasonal changes, weather activity, surrounding forest conditions, and other natural phenomena which would affect sound coloration qualities.
One of Leif's major concerns is the urgent need for new aesthetic models and processes which can allow artists to expand the traditional humanistic bases of art while fully using contemporary tools, technologies and media, he feels nature can continue as a prime source for artistic inspiration.

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U O IOWA Faculty list pdf

LOGOS Foundation, Ghent pdf (B) list

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Leif Brush and the Earth Philharmonic

by Dave Helland

NEW TIMES, December, 1974
Iowa City, Iowa--Someday Leif Brush will write a symphony, but now he is busy tuning a tree, perfecting the Insect Broadcasting System, and inventing other instruments to perform the symphony. The rough idea for his river harp is on paper: now he needs engineers to put his idea into blueprint form and roughly $500,000 to construct the instrument. His rain and draft monitors are perfected. These are all examples of what Brush calls terrain instruments, instruments played by the elements of nature. The music they make are the random, minute sounds of nature-water running down a tree, ants' footsteps, a leaf hiting a taut wire- electronically amplified and then recorded.
Unlike his fellow professors at the University of Iowa's School of Art, who paint, sculpt or make prints in their indoor studios, Brush's studio is his yard and house. When the wind is strong, he monitors three steel stakes in the ground around a tree and several steel pins driven into the trunk, crotch, bark and limbs of the tree. By hooking one of the stakes or pins to a pre-amp, he can record the vibrations caused by wind buffeting the tree. Each is recorded separately, but his goal is to be able to hear them simultaneously. Soon, he'll be able to mix the recordings to bring out the most interesting sound taking place at any given moment.
Five wires of different gauges strung between two trees serve as his cricket and cicada monitor. Insect noises cause the the wires to vibrate slightly, but when these vibrations are amplified electronically they can be recorded. While recording this monitor, he heard strange noises he couldn't account for until he noticed that ants were crawling across the wires of the monitor. This led to the portable Insect Broadcasting System, consisting of an amplifier, transmitter and insect recording studio (a small plastic box with a tinsel-thin metal floor wired to pick up the sounds of ants walking).
Brush has perfected some other devices for recording the sounds nature makes but rarely lets us hear. His draft monitor is constructed of individually tunable wires and fits into a window. Besides letting flies in, it allows Brush to record sounds made by gusts blowing into his house. His rain monitor is a 300-foot length of 12-gauge wire. The amplified vibrations caused by raindrops hitting the wire sound like the random striking of piano keys.
"When you pluck a guitar the sound decays, dies out, after only a few seconds, but the decay time of the rain monitor lasted sometimes for more than a minute without any electronic restatement. This makes the acoustics of a concert hall sound like a peanut shell. Man-made acoustics are too limited and contained for me scale-wise," says Brush.
My goals go beyond perfecting each individual instrument and then composing music the way a producer arranges various tracks in order to make a record. He wants to explore new arts forms by showing how art and technology can work together. "Lots of what we know trickles off from the branches of science while exploration in art has sort of ground to a halt. The uneasiness I feel with compartmentalizing science into one area and art into another is that it only siphons off the energy that should flow between the two."
The $3,000 grant Brush received last year from the National Endowment for the Arts enabled him to show how science and technology can mesh. His river harp, "an interdisciplinary, generative public-use sculpture," sprang from the work he did under the grant. He proposed to the university a musical instrument that would span the Iowa River. Brush's rough design called for 75 wires to be strung between beams anchored on both sides of the Iowa River. Three performance bbarges joined as one would float underneath the wires, and their parabolic shape woulf focus and reflect the sounds made by musicians, actors or dancers on the barge toward the wires. Sensors on the barge floor would make it possiblle to hear as well as see people dance.The river harp, however, was an idea whose time has not yet come.
While several engineering professors volunteered to work out the technical problems, the art and music instructors vetoed the project as too weird. What is Brush doing? Sometimes even he doesn't know. "I'm not going to put a label on my work before I know what the hell it is. Some people say I'm putting down certain artistic forms. Really, I'm just temporarily unplugging from them." return tto reconnect with natural phenomena

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Colorado Daily, November 21, 1975

by Jennifer Heath

Wagner's Ring Cycle exploded ("...Surf the Ring. It's quite a ride.") at the Music Hall on Tuesday night without benefit fo vocalists or melodies. Instead, the jarring atmospheric sound effects that Wagner might have used--had he access to electronics and Leif Brush's Terrain Instruments--were performed alone. Brush, the University's visiting artist this week, makes these effects with what he calls Audible Sculpture.
With "Cricket Chord Monitors," glass rods, transducers, magnesium "Signal Discs," modulated lasers and scanning electron microscopes, Brush records the movements of water, wind, bushes, thunderstorms, insects and snowflakes. He then spontaneously blends the sounds on tape, unorchestrated and un-choreographed. A synthesizer was used in his second piece, 1975-1976 Network Mode: Brush Passaround--not by Brush, but by a friend. However, much of the concert had the sonorous purity of a synthesizer rather than the soft subtle redundancies one associates with nature's voice. Nevertheless, Leif Brush's technology and art is stong and original.
A scuffed assistant professor of art at the University of Iowa, brush began his career in radio and television announcing. The army taught him basic electronics--he claims to know very little electronics and calls in engineers or physicists to help put his ideas to work--but he dead-ended because "there was nothing I was doing that was my own."
Finally, he enrolled at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he received a Masters in Fine Arts, found "thinking time" and an outlet for his "science-art."
Directed by the premise that there are "scores in nature" that can be tapped with the "right kind of sensors and interceptors," Brush began in 1968 to organize the trees, bushes and grasses into an earthly symphony. His obsession is the scientific methods for using these "instruments."
Excited by technology, he appears to be a man divided between science and art. His philosophy of art, however, denies art's restrictiveness to itself. "After my visual training, I'm kind of prejudiced against the eyes having it always and always. Art is probly going down for the last time if it overlooks some kind of integration. Science is going to steal the show. There are more things that have greater impact, as a body, than visual art. Science is bearing down on us. You need a force to match a force and the artistic force alone isn't going to do it. Creativity is up against the phenomena and imagery that science is coming up with.
"After four years at Iowa, my decision is to devise a curriculum so that the art student has access to any resources in the university--no door would be closed. For example, there would be something going on in physics that the art student could use in the form of a foundation course.
Leif Brush is one of the very few artists who are developing a technological art, though there are others who are using sound, John Cage, for example, recorded traffic, footsteps and silence. Brush is "bored"by man-made sounds, except where man is reacting to the rhythms made by natural instruments.
The player of the Signal Discs is not inventing his rhythms, but responding to those of the tree. Brush does not necessarily use musicians either but people who are "really curious to satisfy the nooks and crannies of their minds and have never met satisfaction with any other kind of sound. It triggers some really dormant things in the head."
Brush is filled with ideas about recording more sounds--the growth of a tree root, for instance--but he is not (sic.) interested in making visual images from his recordings. He feels that he has opened up new subjective images for the exploring artist to experience and use.
But if most man-made sounds are garbage to Brush, he also says that "a lot of stuff I'm interested in, science regards as noise. If they're seeking these enormous large-scale computer models, there's lots of noise they don't want--interference. Their by product stuff is of interest to me."
Science's trash, in other words, is used in the same way that some artists are using video feedback. And, of course, Brush is not only anxious that artists look outside of art for inspiration, but that scientists look into art perhaps for humanization. Brush doesn't want anyone's mind "cheated out of anything."
In the fall of 1976, Brush will receive a grant to further his explorations--this time with a satellite to receive the noises made by people in Iowa counties. The noise will be specific to what the noise-makers' choose and will culminate at the satellite in one full symphonic sound. Whatever the results, Brush's vision is to "survey, explore and overhear the natural dynamic goings-on." He would like to take his tapes to Germany next summer and use them in an upcoming performance of Wagner's Ring Cycle. That would probably suit Wagner just fine.

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The University of Chicago Magazine Volume LXIX, Number 3

Spring 1977

ON THE MIDWAY

Performance Art: Music of the Trees
Our campus reporter, somwhat dazed by a concentration of contemporary culture at Midway Studio's Performance Art show, reports the following:
"The press release said thta the artist might find the only interesting thing about his activity is the process of doing it. But the activity itself might be of interest to others. That didn't tell what to expext.
"I picked an evening called "Imported Sources." 'The artist was Leif Brush and it could have been anything.
"Tree stumps. Midway Studios was full of tree stumps. One looked like part of a Bell telephone pole, which it was; the others were ordinary stumps with wires, front surface mirrors, and strange-looking discs on them. It was to be a forest-land symphony--music from trees and their environment.
"Leif Brush and his artist-wife, photographer Gloria bent over stumps, pulling wires, tapping bark. We were not to hear the actual sounds from these stumps. The stumps were symbols of a Minnesota forest from which we were to hear a pre-recorded symphony.
"The lights went out. In the dark, a red laser beam flashed to a tree, hit a mirror, and bounced to another and another until all the trees flashed red. Then, the music. I closed my eyes. It was a little like heavy-footed elves. It was exhilarating.
"Leif Brush does sound sculptures. He is interested in the rhythms of the land, and places spot-sensing transducers on various parts of a tree, a root, a limb, or on the soil. By wind fluctuations, the trees resonate to produce sounds. Different trees produce different sounds. Weather conditions affect the sound. Our performance was'birch signatures aurally meshed with the imported in the Meany Ice Shelf on Lake Superior's northwestern shore.'
"brush asked if there were any questions. He didn't know what University of Chicago students were like. There were dozens of questions. What was the technical setup of the sensors and laser; what was the theory behind it? Were the Brushes artists or scientists in disguise? 'I just do it,' said Brush. 'I know how it works.' Not good enough. How does it work? Brush became a human laser beam, bounding from tree symbol to tree symbol, trying to discover the process. 'I've got it' he shouted, and explained the technical details of his art. Then, enthused, he described his dream--dividing Minnesota into sections, wiring the trees in each, and from hills and valleys and riversides, transmuting the tree sounds into a statewide forest symphony. An exciting moment! A real performance.
Anyone who is interested in hearing a 90-minute cassette of Leif Brush's Terrain Instruments is invited to write him c/o the Unversity of Iowa, Iowa City, 52242

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Leif Brus
h: Terrain Instruments Windinch/Windscube Drawings


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High Performance, Spring-Summer, 1982

British Library, Sound Archive Catalogue Search: enter Leif Brush
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Leif Brush: Music From Trees, Iceflows and Other Natural Phenomena, an Interview with Leif Brush, by Gordon Monahan. # 30
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MUSICWORKS Issue #30 Winter 1985 - Sound Constructions

Articles: Pheumafoons, Dudafoons, Manipilafoons: an interview with Moniek Darge and Godfried Willem-Raes, by Gordon Monahan and Andrew Timar
Snareninstallaties: String Installations (with Johan Goedart), by Paul Panhuysen
Singing Wires: The Music of Aeolean Harps, by Gordon Monahan
Thoreau and the Telegraph Harp: excerpts from Thoreau's Journals
Music From Trees, Iceflows and Other Natural Phenomena, an Interview with Leif Brush, by Gordon Monahan
Terrain Instruments, by Lief Brush
Dreams of an Instrument Maker, by David Rokeby

Recordings: Pneumafoon, Pneumaphonics; Snareninstallaties (with Moniek Darge), by Godfried Willem-Raes and Moniek Darge
Timeframes, by Moniek Darge
Whistlers; Windribbon; Vertical Signal Discs; Treeharps Networking, by Lief Brush
Gigantic Aeolian Harp (with Thaddeus Holownia), by Gordon Monahan

TeleSuonovision: Sound's Image "EAR Issue: The Composer and the Moving Image
Fall, 1985 "
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Neue Instrumente und Klangskulppturen: Ein Uberblick, Hugh Davies

 

Mittwoch, 10, 1987
There are two wider ranges, where with electrical Ger it ten and Kl ngen, which is rbar only ber loudspeaker h, is worked. Highly sensitive special microphones, which often "mikroskopisch" small clay/tone vibrations amplifiers rken, form the basis of many work of K nstlern like Takis, Hugh Davies, Dieter Tr stedt, Mario Bertoncini, the group of probes, Richard Lerman, Chris Brown and Prent Rodgers. In some work of Leif Brush it are used, in order to make for Naturvorg nge h rbar, e.g. a cracking of the ice in the Fr hjahr and the Flie EN of the juice in B umen. Such instruments underline the tactile aspect of a musical Auff hrung; this plays also with "Synthesizers" of Waisvisz and Gray a substantial role. In advance taken up Kl nge is manipulated when playing by the h ndische moving of differently long Magnetb ndern (see Waisvisz), which become with Laurie Anderson more ber a playing the violin elbow strained. With Jon Hassell and Akio Suzuki a fixed appropriate R is moved ckspielkopf over rectangular installed short tape sections. Christian Marclay distorts and zerkratzt cutouts of different records and makes from it Collagen, which he plays then on up to 8 Disco record players. With most angef hrten examples of electrical and particularly more again high tech there are also elements of old-fashionable techniques here and "volkst mlicher" Materials in or other aspect of the instrument or the sound sculpture. Hugh Davies


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Wilderness As a Reeentrant Form: thoughts on the future of electronic art and nature

"The conception of the form lies in the desie to distinguish. Granted this desire, we cannot escape the form, although we can see it anyway we please." (G.Spencer-Brown)

by David Dunn, 1988
"...As we appear to be moving further away from rootedness in a somatic. relationship
with a biological ... For instance, the sculptor Leif Brush has extended his interest in audible sculpture to include the fabrication of a series of "Terrain Instruments: sound orchestration through optical and vibrational sensing of outdoor sculptural configurations and atmospherics"...

[PDF]
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from Sound by Artists (Art Metropole and Walter Phillips Gallery, 1990

excerpt
"Some History
Kevin Concannon

As with photography, sound recording has developed consistently toward a refinement of its greatest perceived virtue: its ability to recreate, ever more accurately, an event displaced from its original time and place. Both media were created to preserve real-time reality and subsequently, both have been manipulated by artists to create realities that exist only as reproduction. Sound works by artists evolved largely out of the tradition of performance art. The early recordings of Futurists and Dada artists, that begin the brief and intermittent history of artists' records, along with still photographs and precious little film footage, provide the best documents that we have of their real-time work. To this day, performance artists use recordings as a way to disseminate and promote their work.

Numerous recordings of Fillipo Marinetti, leader of the Futurists, have been preserved and are occasionally released on anthology LP's and audio cassette magazines.2 Along with a few recordings by Kurt Schwitters, Richard Huelsenbeck and Raoul Hausmann, these Marinetti pieces not only offer an aural glimpse of early performance art but pre-figure a lot of later work that only became possible with the wide availability of tape recorders and, more recently, digital audio sampling equipment.

While the tradition of sound poetry that developed from Marinetti's words-in-freedom and the Dada nonsense poetry of Hugo Ball and others is well known, both Marinetti and Kurt Schwitters became interested in manipulating sound with technology long before manipulation became common practice. Marinetti composed five pieces for radio performance in the 1930S that prefigured experiments with musique concrète of fifteen years later. 'Splicing' together several distinct sounds such as water, fire and human voices, he created his radio sintesi.

The manifesto of the Futurist Radiophonic Theatre was published by Marinetti and Pino Masnata in October 1933. The manifesto begins with a self-aggrandizing litany of Futurism's past accomplishments presented as a report of the Second National Congress of Futurism. Among those goals advocated by the conference are the 'overcoming of earth with the intuition of the means discovered to realize the trip to the Moon' and the 'overcoming of patriotism with a more fervid patriotism transformed into authentic religion for the country warning the semites to identify themselves with their different countries if they don't wish to disappear.3 While the former suggests the Futurists' faith in technology, the latter offers but one of many specific examples of their vile politics, certainly a major factor contributing to the scholarly neglect of Futurist work of this period.

At the point in this document when the issue of radio is brought up, the authors begin by citing the miracle of television and their anticipation of teletactilism and teletaste. While waiting, however, they would perfect the art of radio. Much of what is said reiterates the theories of Rudolf Arnhelm and others, stating that their radio 'begins where theatre, cinema and narration end.' In addition to prescribing the use of noise, Marinetti's own words-in-freedom and simultaneous action that were the staples of Futurist performance, the manifesto proposes several other practices that were more specific to radio. Some of them were to be realized only much later:

Detection, amplification and transfiguration of vibrations given out by materials. As today we listen to the song of the forest or the sea, tomorrow we will be seduced by the vibrations of a diamond or a flower.

This notion of the amplification of 'microscopic' audio phenomena has been realized more recently by such artists as Richard Lerman and Lief Brush. Both use modern microphones and electronics to 'blow up' tiny sounds, normally not heard by the human ear. Lerman, for example, uses piezo microphones to amplify the sounds of metal as activated by a blowtorch. Brush surgically implants miniature microphones into trees to make audible the sounds of trees growing. In both cases, the microphone is analogous to the microscope. While today such extreme amplification can be accomplished, in 1933 it would have been quite impossible; and their intuitive foresight on this point should be recognized as being as startling as their visions of lunar landings.

Other prescriptions in their manifesto that are more recently familiar include the 'utilization of interferences among radio stations and of the rising and fading of sounds' and the 'geometric limitation and building of silence.'

As best as I can determine, the actual practice of Futurist radio at this time was limited to presentations of live performances of Marinetti's plays and sound poems which were also recorded and pressed as phonograph records. Marinetti wrote five scores for radio syntheses that same year although they were not published until 1938. Three of these pieces dealt specifically with the 'limitation and construction of silence':

Silences Speaking to Each Other

* 15 seconds of pure silence
* Do re mi on flute
* 8 seconds of pure silence
* Do re mi on flute
* 29 seconds of pure silence
* So on piano
* Do on trumpet
* 40 seconds of pure silence
* Do on trumpet
* Wheh wheh wheh of baby boy
* 2 seconds of pure silence
* 1 minute of rrr of motor
* 2 seconds of pure silence
* Surprised Oooooh of 2-year-old girl

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Tonmeistertagung Hannover 2002 Wellenfeldsynthese, Mastering ...
... Pieces / EMS 30 Years" / FYLP 1026 / CD-270 / P-104 / Brush Leif Terrain Instruments Are Activated ... CD-11 / CD-471 / Davies Hugh Shozyg Sequence No. .
..


?the aerial / a journal in sound? (1991) < # 4 > Various Composers ??V.A.:Brenda Hutchinson / Peter Van Riper / Erik Belgum / Leif Brush / Elodie Lauten / Various Performer????[CD (?WHAT NEXT?) THE AERIAL AER 1991- 4] ?2583-

 

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Experimental Musical Instruments VOLUME VII #6, JULY 1992
Richard Waters' Waterharp; Terrain Instruments by Leif Brush; air column acoustics part II; an early color organ/spectrum analyzer; whistles from beach rocks; Liza Carbé"s Zil; listing of recent articles in other periodicals.

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Brush, Leif. Aspects of the terrain instruments. The Tuning of the World, ... Davies, Hugh. A history of sampling. Unfiled - Music under New Technology. ...

Presentation of the Terrain Instruments work for Tuning of the World, the First International Conference on Acoustic Ecology sponsored jointly by the Banff Centre and the University of Calgary (August B-14, 1993, the Banff Centre for the Arts, Brush presentation August 11, 1993).
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endeavor: I ask you by Leif Brush

The objective is to intermingle Internet-wide concepts and potentials with sound-centered research. Overall, the aim is to suggest that these world-wide contributions may encourage ongoing multi-disciplinary projects, which will continue pointing and clicking through the interdisciplinary aspects of creativity, science, and communications-via-the-technologies.

Non-traditional multimedia processes exist in a variety of digital imaging formats using still and video sources today and continue to capture the imagination of creative people who use computers and the world wide Internet. Sometimes interactive, these engage the viewer in public places in both randomness and predictability. They raise issues of control over self-directed experiences. Some viewers still prefer the very direct involvement in physical and psychological space over the lack of traditional human contact in cyberspace. Artists have always had new tools at their disposal, and computer-based communication provides a new array of possibilities.

When compared to the traditional artforms ranging from drawing to photography to sculpture, the new interactive, computer-based communication invites multiple collaborations from various disciplines, which this project engages in its conjoining of new art in technologies directions.

This project is cyber-centered, and is but a small part of an enormous creative challenge: How should artists today explore these resources in order to be able to contribute to the essential changes in the nature of human experience? Among other issues, questions arise concerning the interaction between participant and device; between participants; and between participants and creators. New kinds of aural space and imagery communications are being generated.

Compared to the new potentials of computer-based, interactive art, multimedia art of the past has primarily focused upon the temporal dimension. A major challenge of this project is to use these new communicative possibilities to juxtapose information, research and perspectives about sound as a considered and essential element.

These linked pages are to contain the structuring around an acoustic ecology * theme, mirror ongoing Internet art in technology developments, and detail the occurrences which are likely to take place via the during the I ask you process.

return to endeavor: I ask you

sensorium Meeting place All Check-ins
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e x c e r p t e d Resume & Selected Teleperformances, Installations, Publications, Articles

I'm concentrating on the realtime and oncall 2way availability of data-laden resources from you. My work now is laying the groundwork for my making sounds available from my signal disc, selfbroadcasting trees, lased raindrops, recycled and new windribbons.. to express these physical vibrations in realtie as a recontextualized audil construct.

The varied sensors I have used, such as strain gauges and accelerometers, collect sound in a different way than conventional air microphones. I am now adding the Microflown as a complementary input resource.

I have constructed diverse installations, Terrain Instruments, which are intended
to interact with natural phenomena, sometimes through human intercession,
or "playing." I have used, for example, hydrophones to monitor ice floes and
the gradual buildup of ice in Lake Superior, and have listened to the
movements of trees and limbs in many locations through a combination of
crystal and proximity sensors.

After an intense period of analog familiarization with the range and enormity of available sounds in nature and exploration of space, I tried the only techniques then available to me,tape manipulation and speaker placements. The only coloration that I employed in this sound handling was through equalization, balancing and combining in mix-downs. I have always monitored from nearly neutral sensors, and my interest has been in configuring and juxtapositionings and in the presentation of sound in selected contexts, both interior and exterior. In the 1980s I workerd with 200-speakers through an Intel 8080 microprocessor which was used for teleperformances both indoors and out.

All my work centers around spatial concerns andI think produces an awareness of the psychological effects of sounds. The early microprocessor allowed for the manipulation of specific sounds through a cubed environment consisting of two hundred speakers.


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Labratorio di Epistemologia Informatica e Dipartimento di Scienze Filosofiche

Babel Fish translation
4. http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~swilson/book/infoartsbook.html Information Arts. Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology "...Like desume from the brought back Index at the bottom, Wilson has subdivided just the text second the thematic technologies and the tecno-scientific ones used and discussed from the artists. We consider the case of Biology: here innumerevoli and important concerning issues reside the nature of the human being and the implications of the biological manipulation. The interest in this field from part of artists laughed them quite to 1936, when Edward Steichen presentò to an exposure some floreali crossings. But è also true that to interact with living organisms places not only scrupoli ethical: tasks to the bundle of reflections that is involved the destrutturazione of the manipulation concept and that one of permanence of the work. In spite of the gravit of such issues, the artists who s' interest to Biology are innumerevoli: from Eduardo Kac (Transgenic Art) to Athena Tacha (The Human Body: An Invisible Ecosystem), from Hubert Duprat (its arthropod-jewels) to Leif Brush (World Soundscape Project). A field nearly to sé è then constituted from the reflections on the body and the post-human: the issues are urgent and alarming, going to impattare the same notion of identit and conception of the Sé. Here the artistic experimentation rises to the role of important stimulus of thought - stimulus sometimes soothed, sometimes violentemente provocative: we will then cite the Stelarc Australian (whose job "poeticamente oscillates between the light of the optimism and the shadow of the aversion", p. 158), Marcel.li Antunez Roca (Epizoo), the Center for Metahuman Exploration and Fakir Musafar (Hindu Spear Kavadi). In all these artists è clear the critic, or at least the reflection afflicted, on the intrusivit authoritarian of the doctor-scientific vision..."
Università degli Studi di Bari - Laboratorio di Epistemologia Informatica e Dipartimento di Scienze Filosofiche

Environmental Studies, Seminar

WILDERNESS AS REENTRANT FORM: thoughts on the future of electronic art and nature

atmospheric conditions / leif brush Notation program(PDF) return to related pages

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I Built It! The Built Environment In American Music
Construction: Harry Partch And "His Children"
Published: August 1, 2003

Out To The Stars, Into The Heart: Spatial Movement in Recent and Earlier Music
Walkthroughs, Street Events, and Audience Participation
return to previous

earth's streams

utopian proposal;"Trees of Knowledge"

"The dominance of the visual in media art has broken down...."

redo networking

realtime, remote controlled internet streaming, passaroundsound a/o delayed transcriptions

"music genres: electronic(a)/electroacoustic" pdf
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conceive weblackwhole cellphone, WWV/gps-give/takes fr/Lat./Long. sites
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leif BRUSH's soundworks embedded in The Tulse Luper Journey; soundworks 1, pdf 2.

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cont. weblackwhole cellphone, WWV/gps-give/takes fr/Lat./Long. sites

This is the podcast feed for those podcasts grouped around the keyword "netlabels". en-us info@podcast.net Sat 18 Feb 2006 20:28:42 GMT Artist: Dublee Title: Deviation Label: Epsilonlab Track: 03. Twin (Dublee Mix) Mon 13 Feb 2006 05:36:42 GMTACOWO Artist: Dublee Title: Deviation Label: Epsilonlab Track: 01. Twin (Classic Mix) Mon 13 Feb 2006 05:36:42 GMTACOWO Artist: Dublee Title: Deviation Label: Epsilonlab Track: 02. Gallop Mon 13 Feb 2006 05:36:42 GMTACOWO Artist: Dublee Title: Deviation Label: Epsilonlab Track: 04. Twin (Paul Keeley Remix) Mon 13 Feb 2006 05:36:42 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 05. Dimensional Injection (Edit) Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 03. Technical Stratosfear Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 07. System Defragmentation Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 02. Static Storm (Edit) Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 01. Snowball Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 06. Dimensional Injection (Clive Kells Remix) Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Bazz Barr Title: Infrared EP Label: Electrotoxic Track: 04. SlutDistorter Sun 12 Feb 2006 06:14:52 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 07.Electroliving - Ida Y Vuelta Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 04. Electroliving - Halac Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 09. Marcelino - So Tired (Electroliving Mix) Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 02. Marcelino - Lateral Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 01. Electroliving - Electroliving Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 06. Marcelino - Tired Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 03. Electroliving - Electroliving - Marcelino Mix Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 05. Electroliving + Marcelino - Halac + Tired (Marcelino Bootleg) Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: Electroliving + Marcelino Title: Random Label: Sinergy Networks Track: 08. Electroliving + Marcelino - Living Room +So Tired + Halac (Electroliving Mix) Wed 08 Feb 2006 13:02:06 GMTACOWO Artist: 7AM aka Off Pop Title: Money For Nothing, Music For Free Label: S!te Records Track: 05. Things Like That (Deckard Flow Rmx) Sat 04 Feb 2006 08:28:25 GMTACOWO Artist: 7AM aka Off Pop Title: Money For Nothing, Music For Free Label: S!te Records Track: 04. All OK Sat 04 Feb 2006 08:28:25 GMTACOWO Artist: 7AM aka Off Pop Title: Money For Nothing, Music For Free Label: S!te Records Track: 02. Fantasticum Sat 04 Feb 2006 08:28:25 GMTACOWO Artist: 7AM aka Off Pop Title: Money For Nothing, Music For Free Label: S!te Records Track: 01. Things Like That Sat 04 Feb 2006 08:28:25 GMTACOWO Artist: 7AM aka Off Pop Title: Money For Nothing, Music For Free Label: S!te Records Track: 03. Over Sat 04 Feb 2006 08:28:25 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 04. Violett - Ukelele (Seph Remix) Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 05. Gurtz - Paseo Por El Bosque Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 06. Barem + Dilo - Igloo Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 02. Seph - Void Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 11. Dilo - Mis Ranitas Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 01. Gurtz - Dect Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 08. Omar Salgado - Petalos Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 07. Dilo - 992 Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 10. Violett - Ukelele Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 09. Seph - Downstairs Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Artist: Various Title: Aires Buenos Label: Unfoundsound Track: 03. Omar Salgado - Asterisco Sat 28 Jan 2006 06:22:39 GMTACOWO Here is the playlist and audio file for January 28, 2006. L'arrivée by Ehma Artiste by Lonah check-mate by loobke Forever by Lizzi Dance by Over All Brothers Fond sonore n°6 by solcarlus... Sat 28 Jan 2006 01:51:00 GMTBiotic Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 02. Oeste Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 09. Doctor Tomas Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 06. Onda (Deep Mix) Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 01. Rapido Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 07. Cancion De Cuna (Receptor Mix) Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 03. Ritmo Propio Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 05. Hielo Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 08. Gran Union Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 04. Cancion De Cuna Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Artist: Alta Infidelidad Title: Cactus Y Volcanes Label: Thinner Track: 10. Rapido (Christian Dittmann Version) Tue 24 Jan 2006 13:54:20 GMTACOWO Poland, Italy, China, Germany, France, Switzerland, USA, Canada. Black Sweater, White Cat was on a world tour this week. Here is the audio file for the show. Thanks for listening. Mon 23 Jan 2006 11:44:00 GMTBiotic Artist: Leif Brush Title: TerraInstruments Label: Earlabs Track: 03. Cue_07 Tue 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 GMTACOWO Artist: Leif Brush Title: TerraInstruments Label: Earlabs Track: 02. Cue_06 Tue 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 GMTACOWO Artist: Leif Brush Title: TerraInstruments Label: Earlabs Track: 04. Cue_08 Tue 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 GMTACOWO Artist: Leif Brush Title: TerraInstruments Label: Earlabs Track: 05. Cue_09 Tue 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 GMTACOWO Artist: Leif Brush Title: TerraInstruments Label: Earlabs Track: 01. Cue_05 Tue 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 GMTACOWO Here is the audio file for last night's show...and what a show it was! Something about impending weather to focus the mind. Many thanks to Grant Robertson and his new project, CC365. CC365 is providi... Sun 15 Jan 2006 17:22:00 GMTBiotic Artist: Asher Title: Three Untitled Pieces Label: Earlabs Track: 03. (1/6/04) Wed 11 Jan 2006 08:19:44 GMTACOWO Artist: Asher Title: Three Untitled Pieces Label: Earlabs Track: 02. (For F) Wed 11 Jan 2006 08:19:44 GMTACOWO Artist: Asher Title: Three Untitled Pieces Label: Earlabs Track: 01. (1/5/04) Wed 11 Jan 2006 08:19:44 GMTACOWO Artist: Gordon Tebo Title: Adaptive Immune Label: Test Tube Track: 04. All New Again Sun 08 Jan 2006 10:50:36 GMTACOWO Artist: Gordon Tebo Title: Adaptive Immune Label: Test Tube Track: 01. Blue In You Sun 08 Jan 2006 10:50:36 GMTACOWO Artist: Gordon Tebo Title: Adaptive Immune Label: Test Tube Track: 02. Process For Progress Sun 08 Jan 2006 10:50:36 GMTACOWO Artist: Gordon Tebo Title: Adaptive Immune Label: Test Tube Track: 03. Homeopath Inversion Sun 08 Jan 2006 10:50:36 GMTACOWO Here is the audio file for this evening's program. It was fun. Enjoy. Ambre by Trois p'tits points Taxi de nuit by Boulbar paradeiser by Ivan der Dreckige Pink Fish Signs (Take One) by GeeNe... Sat 07 Jan 2006 18:01:00 GMTBiotic Here is both the set list and the program audio file in one post. We had a wonderful interview with Comfort Stand's Otis Fodder and Mr. Melvis. Breaking news from the interview: Otis is stepping a... Mon 02 Jan 2006 14:31:00 GMTBiotic

grenzenlos

N[you]
Music in a globalized world

Stuttgart, July 24 th-28 th 2006
In cooperation with the Institute for New Music and Music Education Darmstadt

 

Welcome members

leave your name, some details as to your present computer use, email, URL and/or whatever else you'd like to share

prior to our meeting(s) in Stuttgart.

work overture project 36th FESTIVAL SYNTHESE BOURGES pdf

STEREOLITH WORKS Digital Art Weeks Zurich_06.pdf

in progress SOUND'S IMAGE CONCEPT: V1
Generational inputs are realtime, since the natural phenomena sources to be monitored are often "cyclic," and any such "recordings" should be ephemeral, short or long term memory. The resultant offering is an aural and visual image and sound construction with interactive spatial interfaces and conjoins invisible winds as perceptible holographic imaging.

HE IDEA CHALLENGES
spatial imaging essentials: constructing holograms from contextual-sounding wind
Realtime data sends from regional sites are synced using the international WWV/B time codes and each locale uses triaxial sensors These are exposed to a common and prevailing wind front. Sensor outputs are assigned separately: Xs to modulated laser for holographic displaying, Ys and Zs are mulitplexed time/space contexts. Internet streams are targeted.

TECHNICAL DETAILS triaxial sensor, preamps DC mixer descriptions

 

ongoing projects; proposal: Internet blackwhole Web 2.0 catalyst

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