“And the Moral of the Story Is…”

Created by Kristine Ortiz

 

Prefatory statement:

 

Morals and values represent a large part of the lives of people in modern society. They are a way for people to justify their action or inaction. They can also dictate the ways in which people react to those around them. What many people do not consider is where the morals they act upon originated. In this unit, “And the Moral of the Story Is…,” students will use fairytales and fables to explore the concepts of morals and values and how they apply in their own lives and society in general. They will eventually use the morals that they discover in these stories to perform an ‘experiment’ as to how these morals play out in their everyday lives.

 

This unit will benefit students by giving them the tools they need to evaluate and recognize the morals and values that they come into contact with on a daily basis. Knowing what morals are allows students to decide what morals they would like to act on. This unit may even introduce them to new ideas that they never even considered. Eventually, students will go out into the world with the morals and values that they’ve internalized. The morals students hold can keep society as it is or reshape it for the future, depending on how students choose to live their lives.

 

Class Specification:

 

This unit is appropriate for students in grades 7-9. I believe that the heavy focus on morality via the use of fables and fairytales would make it inappropriate for students younger than grade 7. The use of fables and fairytales makes this unit inappropriate for students who are older than grade 9. All learners should be able to garner some knowledge from this unit though parts of it require a significant amount of prior knowledge of morality and the role it plays in a societal context. In order to diffuse any beliefs that the fables and fairytales used in my class are trying to teach students a specific set of religious beliefs, it is important to mention to parents of all students that everyone defines good and bad in different ways and that the unit is merely designed to teach different perspectives.

 

Significant Assumptions:

 

 

Desired outcomes/Standards/Objectives to be met:

 

Unit Objectives:

 

By the end of this unit students will:

 

 

Possible Whole-Class Activities:

 

 

 

Possible Small-Group Activities:

 

  1. During the unit launch activity have students share their own interpretations of the phrase “birds of a feather flock together.” Ask them to specify what they think the phrase means and have them challenge each others’ assumptions.
  2. One day a week have a do now activity centered around the moral from the story being read that day. In groups of 2-3, have students attempt to decipher the meaning behind the moral and predict what they think the story is going to be about based on the moral. When finished, have students report back to the class with their predictions.

             

Possible Individual Activities:

 

  1. Have students pick a fable with a moral that they think is relevant to their lives and communities. Ask them to try acting on the moral found in their fable for one week. Have students write one journal entry per day about their experiences with acting on the moral. When the week is over, ask them to share one or two of their experiences with the class.

 

  1. Students will answer questions about The Frog Prince, to themselves, and will then have the option to journal about what they thought of the film. After the class has finished watching the movie, students will discuss their answers to questions.

 

  1. At the beginning of the unit, give students the opportunity to write down their thoughts about any of the stories we read in class. Tell them to write down any questions that they had about the story or their general reflections about the piece and the thoughts that passed through their minds as they were reading it. Students should have at least one entry per week about one of the pieces read in class. Additional journal entries which do not relate to the final writing project (for example writing about every story read in class) will result in extra credit points of one point per entry. *Note* Extra credit will be limited to 10 points per student for the unit. This includes extra credit given to students for presenting their original fables or fairytale.

 

  1. Give students the opportunity to read a minimum of 15 different fairytales and fables. On sheets of loose leaf paper or in their writing journals have students answer the following questions for each story they read:

 

    1. What is the moral of the story you read?
    2. In what ways does it relate to other stories we’ve read in class?
    3. Does the message conveyed in this story conflict with the messages found in any of the other stories you’ve read during this unit? If so, why do you think that is?
    4. How can this story apply to your own life?

             

After students have read each of their 15 stories, have them look for common themes among the stories. In order to diversify the students’ learning, students will read a minimum of at least four fables and four fairy tales. The remaining 7 stories can be any combination of fables or fairy tales that the students wish to read.

 

Ongoing Activities:

 

  1. Journaling: Students will be given the opportunity to write in their writing journals for 5 minutes at the end of every period. Most days will be free writing days, during which students can share anything they want to write down or reflect upon. Some days students will be provided with a prompt to answer. Journals will be collected and looked over every Friday and returned to students at the beginning of the next Monday. All entries, except those which the student specifically states they would not like to be read, will be responded to. During this unit, students will be required to devote one entry per week to responding to one of the stories we’ve read in class.

 

  1. Spelling and vocabulary logs: Students will be responsible for keeping a spelling/vocabulary log. For the spelling log, students will write down any mistakes they find in their own writing. They will use this log in order to become aware of words that they are consistently spelling incorrectly and to become aware of the correct spelling of those words. For the vocabulary logs, students will write down any words they come across in their readings for which they don’t know the meanings. After they have written the word/words down in their log, they will look up the word’s definition and write this next to the word. This will allow students to become somewhat familiar with new words and their definitions.

 

  1. Free-Write Fridays: Every Friday throughout the year, except when noted, will be devoted to students free writing in their journals. Students can also use this time to read independently for their current project, or for pleasure. Pleasure reading can be done in class on the condition that students will journal about the book they are reading for at least a page before leaving for the day. The teacher reserves the right to take away free writing on Fridays if students aren’t fulfilling their journaling requirement. During this time students can choose to conference with the teacher about their current progress in the class and on their unit projects.  

 

Student Resources:

 

  1. A composition or spiral one subject notebook in which to write down reflections and thoughts about the stories read inside and out of class.
  2. Access to a computer or word processor to type up assignments.
  3. Internet access at home and during computer lab time to perform the webquest and do research about different types of morals in stories, as well as to find other stories they would like to read for their independent reading project.
  4. Library access to find stories to read for their independent reading project.
  5. Spelling and Vocabulary log sheets handed out at the beginning of the semester by the teacher.

 

Unit Launch/Anticipatory Set/Set Induction:

 

Display the phrase “Birds of a feather flock together” somewhere in your classroom so that it is in clear view of all of your students. In order to tap into students’ prior knowledge, ask them to raise their hand if they’ve ever heard the phrase before. Pair students off and have them discuss their interpretation of the phrase “birds of a feather flock together.” Once they’ve had a few minutes to do this, come back to large group. Ask a few groups to share their answers with the rest of the class. After a consensus has been reached, pass out copies of the fable, “The Farmer and the Stork.” Read this aloud to the class. Once the fable has been read as a class, ask students if their interpretation of “birds of a feather flock together” has changed based on the actual story.

 

Supporting Materials for Teachers Who Teach the Unit:

 

Teachers can use any number of different fables, and fairy tales throughout the course of this unit. It is important to have a wide variety of stories to discuss in class because this will allow students to gain knowledge of a wide variety of ideas about what morals and values there are in the world. The fairytales and fables mentioned in this unit outline are simply suggestions for teachers.

 

For this version of the unit I’ve used a collection of Aesop’s Fables as retold by Ann McGovern. Since there are so many different collections of Fables and Fairytales, it is up to the teacher to decide which to use and make copies from. A collection of Grimm’s fairy tales is also required. For the video day, look for a copy of “Faerie Tale Theater Presents: The Frog Prince.” The webquest for the unit is located at http://sites.google.com/site/fableswebquest/ and may be used to design your own webquest.

 

Discussion Questions:

 

Morals and Fables

 

 

“Rapunzel,” “Rumplestiltskin,” and similar Fairytales

 

 

General

 

 

“The Fox and the Grapes” and “The Crow and the Pitcher”

 

 

 

 

Revisit the Wall of Morals

 

 

“The Frog Prince”

 

 

Assessment Task:

 

  1. I have developed a webquest that allows students to search the internet for the origins of a few of the fables/fairytales we’ve discussed in class or that they’ve read on their own outside of class.

 

  1. Have students write their own original fable or fairytale. Ask them to include a moral or lesson that is applicable to modern society. Once everyone has submitted their finished product (in electronic form, if possible) compile them and publish them to your class blog or website. Students who wish to gain three extra credit points can present their story to the class on the Friday after the unit test.

 

This assessment task will allow students to display their knowledge of the elements that go into developing a story that also contains a very concrete moral.

 

  1. Students will be given a brief final test worth 25 points.

 

Grades:

 

Students will be graded throughout the unit for their work on individual projects. At the end of the unit, a final grade will be assessed. This will be based on the grades students receive for their projects, webquest, final test, and participation in class. Projects, webquest, test, and participation grades will be totaled together to equal 100 points.

 

Grades will be broken down as follows: 25 points for the “15 Story Independent Reading” project, 15 points for the “Write Your Own Story” project, 10 points for the “Act Out the Moral of the Story” project, 25 points for the final test, 15 points for the webquest, and 10 points for participation. Weekly journal entries will be looked over at the end of the week and checked off toward participation points. Class participation grades will be based upon students’ participation in class discussions, their presentation of their ideas and realizations from their “Act Out the Moral” project, and their journal writing.

 

Extra credit points will be added into the final unit grade. Any grade which exceeds 100 points as a result of extra credit points will count as an A+.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Topic: “And the moral of the story is…” unit introduction Grade level: 7

Length of lesson: _50 minutes_

 

Stage 1 – Desired Results

Content Standard(s):

 

I. Reading and Literature; C. Comprehension; 2., 4. Apply a range of monitoring strategies and self-correction methods.

III. Speaking, Listening, and Viewing; A. Speaking and Listening; 1. Participate in and follow agreed-upon rules for conversation and formal discussions in large and small groups.

 

Understanding (s)/goals

Students will understand:

 

  • That the morals and values they hold often come from stories they’ve never even read.

Essential Question(s):

 

  • What reasons do you think people had for creating stories with morals?
  • How have you heard morals presented, other than in a fable, fairytale, or folktale?

 

Student objectives (outcomes):

Students will be able to:

 

    • All students will be able to understand that some types of stories teach specific lessons.
    • All students will learn and define the terms moral, fable, fairytale, folktale, morality, and value.
    • Most students will be able to connect their prior knowledge of the phrases mentioned in their everyday life to at least one fable.
    • Most students will be able to understand that the lessons taught in these types of stories extend beyond the context of the stories they’re in.
    • Some students will be able to recall specific instances when they’ve been told a moral from a fable, outside of the context of that story.

 

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Task(s):

 

    • Students will write their own fable or fairytale. This fable or fairytale will include a moral that applies in modern society.
    • Students will work on a Webquest based on the origins of fables.
    • Students will take a Unit Test.
    • Students will independently read and journal on a minimum of 15 fables, fairytales, or folktales.
 

Other Evidence:

 

  • Students will demonstrate their prior knowledge of the topic of morals and morality via the launch activity and their answers to the key concepts definitions.
  • Students will discuss in partner groups and then as a large group, their interpretations of a moral from a specific story.
  • Students will reflect to themselves instances when they’ve heard a phrase that comes from a fable, fairytale, or folktale used outside of that context.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Learning Activities:

 

Materials needed

 

-25 copies of “The Farmer and the Stork” from a collection of Aesop’s Fables.

-An overhead projector and blank overhead on which to write student responses.

-Dry erase markers to write on the overhead.

-25 copies of the “Where have you heard this moral?” list.

 

Timeline

 

Step 1 (10 minutes): Introductory Activity; Teacher will prepare in advance an overhead transparency with the phrase “Birds of a feather flock together” written on it. This will be projected at the front of the room as students enter. When everyone is settled in the classroom, ask students to raise their hands if they have ever heard the phrase before. Pair students off and ask them to discuss their own personal interpretations of the phrase. After students have had 2-3 minutes to discuss their interpretations and reach a consensus about their interpretations, return to large group discussion. Have students talk about their interpretations as a large group for 3-5 minutes. Write down their responses on the overhead, below the phrase. Pass out copies of “The Farmer and the Stork.” Read this aloud to the class. Once the story has been read by the entire class, ask everyone if their interpretation of “birds of a feather flock together” has changed based on the source material.

 

Step 2 (20 minutes): Pass out the “Where have you heard this moral?” list (see attached) to each student. Ask them to look over the list for and carefully consider which of the phrases they’ve heard before (2 minutes). When their 2 minutes is up, ask them to raise their hand if they’ve heard 3, 5, 8, or 10 or more of these phrases (3 minutes). Have them circle the phrases that they’ve heard before and then pick 1 or 2 of these phrases to journal about. Have students write the moral they are writing about and their interpretation of the moral at the top of their page. Ask them to follow this with what past experiences they’ve had with that moral (15 minutes).

 

Step 3 (10 minutes): Define key concepts of the unit; On the blackboard, write down the words moral, fable, fairytale, folktale, morality, value. Before defining these words for students, ask them to give their best guess as to what these words mean within the context of the unit. Have students write these definitions down in their notebooks. For homework they will have to write 5 original sentences containing each of the words.

 

Definitions

 

Moral- the moral teaching or practical lesson contained in a fable, tale, experience, etc.

 

Fable- a short tale to teach a moral lesson, often with animals or inanimate objects as characters

 

Fairytale- a story, usually for children, about elves, hobgoblins, dragons, fairies, or other magical creatures.

 

Folktale- a tale or legend originating and traditional among a people or folk, esp. one forming part of the oral tradition of the common people.

 

Morality- conformity to the rules of right conduct; moral or virtuous conduct.

 

Value- the ideals, customs, institutions, etc., of a society toward which the people of the group have an affective regard.

 

Step 4 (10 minutes)- Wrap Up; Remind students that for the next few weeks we will be working extensively on relating the morals found in fables, fairytales, and folktales to their lives and the outside world. Make brief mention of the different projects and assignments students will be completing during the unit (Independent Reading, “Create Your Own Fable/Fairytale,” “Act Out a Moral,” and Journaling). Ask students if they have any questions regarding the unit so far.

 

Homework

 

Using the concepts and terms discussed in class today, write out 5 brief, yet original, sentences using each. Make 4 of these sentences use the word correctly. The final sentence should use the word incorrectly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Topic: “And the moral of the story is…” Create Your Own Fable or Fairytale project

Grade level:

Length of lesson: _50 minutes_

 

Stage 1 – Desired Results

Content Standard(s):

II. Writing; A. Types of Writing; 1. Write frequently in a variety of forms, including but not limited to the following: poems, stories, plays, essays, journals, letters, directions, editorials, business

II. Writing; B. Elements of composition; 4a. Use composing processes to develop writing, including: a. prewriting - planning strategies such as brainstorming, journaling, sketching, listing, outlining and determining audience, purpose and focus

 

 

Understanding (s)/goals

Students will understand:

 

  • How to put the knowledge they’ve learned throughout this unit to practical use.

 

Essential Question(s):

 

  • In what ways can you use what you’ve learned in this unit?

Student objectives (outcomes):

Students will be able to:

 

  • All students will know what their “Create your own Fable or Fairytale” project requires.
  • Most students will have a general idea about what they want their project to be on.
  • Some students will have started drafting or outlining their project.

 

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

Performance Task(s):

 

    • Students will write their own fable or fairytale. This fable or fairytale will include a moral that applies in modern society.
    • Students will work on a Webquest based on the origins of fables.
    • Students will take a Unit Test.
    • Students will independently read and journal on a minimum of 15 fables, fairytales, or folktales.

 

Other Evidence:

 

  • How well does the student utilize the journaling time given to them in class?
  • Does the student ask questions to clarify the project?

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Learning Activities:

 

Materials

 

-25 copies of assignment sheet to pass out to class.

 

Step 1 (10 minutes): Explanation of project; Ask students to brainstorm a few ways in which they can utilize what they’ve learned during this unit. Document some of the responses on the blackboard. Distribute assignment sheet to class. Select a student to read assignment sheet aloud for the class. Ask students if they have any questions or concerns about the assignment. Use different words to re-phrase the requirements of the project. Explain rationale behind project (This project will allow students to put into practice what they’ve learned about morals during the course of this unit. It will give them the opportunity to be creative in how they do this, as opposed to writing a 5 paragraph essay about what morals and morality have to do with literature and the outside world.).

 

Step 2 (35 minutes): Journaling and brainstorming; Once the project has been explained, give students the majority of the remaining time to quietly brainstorm and reflect on what they can write for their project. If they have enough time after doing this, they can also start to create a rough draft of their project. Students may also choose to continue work on one of the other assignments for this class, after they have brainstormed a few ideas about this project. 

 

Step 3 (5 minutes): Wrap Up; Bring students back to large group. Ask students to briefly share some of the ideas that they came up with during their brainstorming session.

 

Homework

 

Come to class tomorrow with an outline of your story. It doesn’t have to be perfect or extensive, just detailed enough to give your classmates and I an idea about what your story is going to cover.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Introduction to Unit-

 

“The Farmer and the Stork” and “birds of a feather flock together” discussion.

 

Journaling about commonly used phrases that are actually the morals to fables.

 

Brief outline of projects and major assignments due in this unit.

 

Explanation of Independent reading project-

 

Give students the assignment requirement handout. Explain requirements to students.

 

Have students ask questions.

 

Read “The Fox and the Goat” and “The Ant and the Dove”-

 

Discuss both stories and how the morals of the stories are displayed in our society.

Continue discussion about morals that perform certain functions in our society.

 

Read “The Fox and the Grapes” and “The Crow and the Pitcher.” Discuss.

 

Wall of Morals-

 

Provide students with markers, construction paper, and butcher paper.

 

Have each student rephrase a moral they have read for their independent reading project, so far. Have them write this down on a piece of construction paper. Compile these and tape or staple them to the butcher paper. Put this somewhere in room. Have students add to this as the unit progresses.

Free-Write Fridays-

 

Students will have the opportunity to journal or read independently.

 

Collect writing journals at the end of class.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Introduction to “Act Out the Moral” project-

 

Have students pick a moral to act out, possibly by referring back to their “Where have you heard this moral?” worksheet.

 

Explain that they are to begin trying to act on the moral immediately after class.

“Appearances can be deceiving” (Part 1)-

 

Read and discuss “The Frog Prince.”

 

Watch the first 30 minutes of “The Frog Prince.”

 

 

 

 

 

“Appearances can be deceiving” (Part 2)-

 

Watch the last 30 minutes of “The Frog Prince.”

 

Discuss the movie version of “The Frog Prince.” Compare the movie to the original story.

Promises-

 

Read and discuss “Rapunzel” and “Rumplestiltskin.”

 

Compare the types of promises made in each

 

 

Free-Write Fridays-

 

Students will have the opportunity to journal or read independently.

 

Collect writing journals at the end of class.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

“Act Out the Moral” project due.

 

Have students share their experiences with the class.

 

Assign partners for webquest.

 

 Introduction to the “Create your own fables or fairytale” project-

 

Hand out project requirements and information sheet. Explain project requirements and information sheet to students.

 

Have students ask questions about the project.

 

Give students the remaining class time to brainstorm and start their project.

Webquest-

 

Students will meet in the computer lab to complete their webquest with their assigned partner.

Webquest-

 

Students will meet in the computer lab to complete their webquest with their assigned partner.

Free-Write Fridays-

 

Students will have the opportunity to journal or read independently.

 

Collect writing journals at the end of class.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Computer Lab Day-

 

Take students to the computer lab to type up their independent reading project or original fables/fairytales project.

Computer Lab Day-

 

Take students to the computer lab to type up their independent reading project or original fables/fairytales project.

Revisit the Wall of Morals-

 

Show class the completed Wall of Morals. Read ones that stick out. Discuss the wall and the creation of the wall.

 

Ask yourself: Which 3 or 4 do you find most meaningful? Think-Pair-Share

Final Unit Test

 

Original Fables/Fairytale project due at the beginning of class.

 

Remind students that they get extra credit if they decide to present their project orally. Compile a list of students who would be comfortable sharing their story with the class.

 

Extra credit oral presentations of students’ original fables and fairytales.

 

Collect writing journals at the end of class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ortiz

7th grade English

 

Due Date:

 

“And the Moral of the Story Is…” independent reading project

 

For this project you will be asked to read 15 fables, fairytales, and folktales independently. You are required to read a minimum of 3 stories from each genre. The remaining 6 can be from any of the genres we’re covering in this unit. As you finish reading each story, answer the following questions in your reading journal:

 

  1. What is the moral of the story you read?
  2. In what ways does it relate to other stories we’ve read in class?
  3. Does the message conveyed in this story conflict with the messages found in any of the other stories you’ve read in this unit? If so, what stories? Why do you think that is?
  4. How can this story apply to your own life?

 

After you’ve read your final story, look for common themes among them. Compile a list of the stories you read and organize it by story theme. Briefly (3-5 sentences) explain why you picked that theme to encompass those particular stories.

 

This project is worth 25 points. 20 points will be given for answering the questions for each story. The remaining 5 points will be for your theme explanations.

 

Type up your journal entries according to the guidelines set forth at the beginning of the year: 12 point font, 1 inch margins, double spaced. Include a heading at the top of the page with your name, my name, your class period, and the due date of this project. Make sure that you also include the title and author of each story read at the beginning of each entry. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ortiz

7th grade English

 

Due Date:

 

Create Your Own Fable or Fairytale

 

For this project you will be asked to write your own fable or fairytale. This story should incorporate some sort of moral undertone which guides the characters to their actions or decisions. The moral presented in your story should be applicable to modern society, though your story doesn’t have to take place in modern times. If you wish, you can write a story based on a moral that we’ve covered in class or that you’ve found while doing your independent reading project.

 

This assignment should, if possible, be submitted in electronic form. The reason for this is that I will be compiling the class’s finished works and publishing them on our class website.

 

Your story should be a minimum of 2-3 pages double spaced, although the final length is up to you. For this reason, if you choose to write fables, you should attempt to write 2 or 3 separate, related fables.

 

*Note* If you decide you would like three extra credit points, you can present your story in front of the class the day after our unit test. Extra credit cannot total more than 10 points for the unit, including extra credit journal entries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ortiz

7th grade English

 

Due Date:

 

Act Out the Moral of the Story

 

It is the third week of our unit on the morals found in fables, fairytales, and folktales. By now you’ve already discovered a number of the different morals that have been written into these kinds of stories.

 

Your homework for the week is to pick a moral you think is relevant in your life and in your community. Starting today, you will act out that moral for the rest of the week. At the end of every day you will write a short journal entry about your experiences acting on that moral.

 

Next Monday I will ask you to briefly share one of your experiences with the rest of your classmates.

 

Hint: Try looking back at the list of morals that I gave you the first day of this unit, if you’re having trouble picking one to act out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Unit Test

 

Name:______________________

Date:_________________

 

Directions: On a sheet of loose leaf paper, answer the following questions about what you’ve learned about morals, fables, fairytales, and folktales.

 

1. Consider some of the many stories we’ve covered in class. What makes these stories effective in conveying their messages? (10 points)

 

2.  Think about the moral of the fable “The Sick Lion:” the wise can learn from the misfortunes of others. Answer the following questions. (15 points)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ortiz

7th grade English

 

Due Date:

 

Journaling Assignment

 

For this assignment you will be asked to write journal entries in response to some of the stories we’ve read in class. The journal entries you write will be counted as part of your class participation grade. Entries should be at least a page long in your writing notebooks. You only need to write one entry per week based on one of the stories we’ve read in class. I will collect your journal at the end of the week and comment on the ideas you set forth in your journal entry.

 

Your journal entries can include questions that you have about a certain story, your general reflection on the piece, or the thoughts that passed through your mind as you were reading it.

 

*Note* If you choose to write journal entries about more than one story per week, you will be given 1 extra credit point per journal. Extra credit for the unit, however, may not total more than 10 points.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Where have you heard this moral?”

 

The following is a list of commonly used phrases that actual come from fables written by Aesop, a Greek slave who lived 3000 years ago. Listed next to them are the fables from which the phrases originated. How many of these phrases have you heard? Pick one or two that you remember hearing and write in your journal about some of the times you’ve heard those phrases used. Include your interpretation of the moral at the beginning of your entry. These are just some of the fables you’ll have the opportunity to read during this unit.

 

Misery loves company.- “The Fox without a Tail”

 

Where force fails patience will often succeed.- “The Crow and the Pitcher”

 

Look before you leap.- “The Fox and the Goat”

 

There is always someone worse off than ourselves.- “The Hares and the Frogs”

 

One good turn deserves another.- “The Ant and the Dove”

 

If you want a job well done, then do it yourself.- “The Lark and Her Young Ones”

 

In time of need the weak may help the strong.- “The Lion and the Mouse”

 

When you try to please everyone, you end up by pleasing no one.- “The Miller, His Son, and Their Donkey”

 

United we stand, divided we fall.- “The Lion and the Bulls”

 

Do not count your chickens before they are hatched.- “The Milkmaid and Her Pail”

 

Many things are easier said than done.- “The Mice in Council”

 

The wise can learn from the misfortune of others.- “The Sick Lion”

 

Two can play the same game.- “The Salt Peddler and the Donkey”

 

In union there is strength.- “The Bundle of Sticks”

 

In time of trouble, one learns who his true friends are.- “The Travelers and the Bear”

 

Let well enough alone.- “The Frogs Who Desired a King”

 

What has value for one is worthless to another.- “The Rooster and the Jewel”

 

 

Story Writing : Create Your Own Fable or Fairytale

 

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Creativity

The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination.

The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination.

There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination.

Characters

The main characters are named and clearly described in text as well as pictures. Most readers could describe the characters accurately.

The main characters are named and described. Most readers would have some idea of what the characters looked like.

The main characters are named. The reader knows very little about the characters.

It is hard to tell who the main characters are.

Problem/Conflict

It is very easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem.

It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face and why it is a problem.

It is fairly easy for the reader to understand the problem the main characters face but it is not clear why it is a problem.

It is not clear what problem the main characters face.

Focus on Assigned Topic

The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic.

Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic.

Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic.

No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic.

Writing Process

Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful.

Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works and gets the job done.

Student devotes some time and effort to the writing process but was not very thorough. Does enough to get by.

Student devotes little time and effort to the writing process. Doesn't seem to care.

Title

Title is creative, sparks interest and is related to the story and topic.

Title is related to the story and topic.

Title is present, but does not appear to be related to the story and topic.

No title.

Organization

The story is very well organized. One idea or scene follows another in a logical sequence with clear transitions.

The story is pretty well organized. One idea or scene may seem out of place. Clear transitions are used.

The story is a little hard to follow. The transitions are sometimes not clear.

Ideas and scenes seem to be randomly arranged.