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Area and perimeterAlgebra

Burns, Marilyn. (1997). Spaghetti and meatballs for all! : a mathematical story. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC B967SP

The seating for a family reunion gets complicated as people rearrange the tables and chairs to seat additional guests.

Kroll, Virginia L. (2005). Equal, shmequal. Watertown, Mass. : Charlesbridge. PRIM-FIC K929eq

In order to have a fun at a game of tug-of-war, forest animals balance the teams by using a see-saw. Includes nonfiction math notes for meanings of equal.

Neuschwander, Cindy. (2007). Patterns in Peru : an adventure in patterning. New York : H. Holt and Co. 152.14 N495p

After getting separated from their parents, Matt and Bibi follow the patterns on an ancient tunic which leads them to the Lost City of Quwi.

classification sortingClassification & Sorting

Cannon, Janell. (1993). Stellaluna. San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. PRIM-FIC C2265ST

After she falls headfirst into a bird's nest, a baby bat is raised like a bird until she is reunited with her mother.

Keenan, Sheila. (1997). More or less a mess! New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC K267MO

A little girl uses sorting and classifying skills to tackle the huge mess in her room. Includes related activities and games.

Reid, Margarette S. (1990). The button box. New York : Dutton Children's Books. PRIM-FIC R357BU

A child examines the many different buttons in Grandma's button box.

 

CountingCounting

Ada, Alma Flor. (1999). How happy I would be. Miami, FL : Santillana. Folio PRIM-FIC A191ho 

How many unusual animals can the narrator take home?

Ada, Alma Flor. (1989). Strange visitors. Miami, FL : Santillana. Folio PRIM-FIC W191st

An insect on Monday, two cows on Tuesday and more animals each other day come to visit, playing musical instruments.

Ada, Alma Flor. (1989). Una extraña visita. Northvale, NJ : Santillana. PRIM-FIC A191EX

An insect on Monday, two cows on Tuesday and more animals each other day come to visit, playing musical instruments. In Spanish.

Ada, Alma Flor. (1999). Who's hatching here? Miami, FL : Santillana. Folio PRIM-FIC A191wh

So many eggs! What will come out of them?

Alda, Arlene. (1998). Arlene Alda's 1 2 3. Berkeley, CA : Tricycle Press. 513.2 A357a

A collection of photographs of things in our environment that resemble the numbers one through ten.

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1977, c1975). Anno's Counting book. New York : Crowell. PRIM-FIC A6156ACO

A counting book depicting the growth in a village and surrounding countryside during twelve months.

Bang, Molly. (1983). Ten, nine, eight. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC B216TE

Numbers one through ten are part of this lullaby which observes the room of a little girl going to bed.

Bayley, Nicola. (1977). One old Oxford ox. New York : Atheneum. PRIM-FIC B3583on

The numbers from one to twelve are presented by dignified animals and captioned by tongue-twisters.

Beaton, Clare. (1999). One moose, twenty mice. New York, NY : Barefoot Books. PRIM-FIC B3693on

Count your way from one through twenty and find the cat hiding in every scene in this felt-art picture book.

Bennett, Madeline. (2000). The best counting book in the Wild West : featuring Accounting Cricket and the Buffalo Bug Band. Phoenix, AZ : Arizona Highways. 513.2 B472b

"Creatures of the Wild West..help children learn to count from 1 to 10 by having them look for hidden numbers".

Berlitz Schools of Languages of America. (1963). Berlitz French alphabet and numbers for children. New York : Grosset & Dunlap. 440 B515B

Attempts to develop a child's awareness of foreign languages with the simple phonetics developed by the Berlitz schools. In French and English.

Blegvad, Lenore. (1968). One is for the sun. New York : Harcourt, Brace, & World. 811 B6465o

Simple rhymed text counts to ten and then ten million using sights, sounds, and sensations in a child’s world.

Bowen, Betsy. (1995). Gathering : a northwoods counting book. Boston : Little, Brown, & Co. 513.2 B786g

A counting book that describes the changing seasons of the north.

Burns, Marilyn. (1996). How many feet? How many tails? : a book of math riddles. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC B967 HO

As two children take a walk with their grandfather, they use their counting skills to help answer a series of animal riddles. Includes related activities.

Carle, Eric. (1999). Rooster's off to see the world. New York, NY : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC C278RO

A simple introduction to the meaning of numbers and sets as a rooster, on his way to see the world, is joined by fourteen animals along the way.

Chwast, Seymour. (1971). Still another number book. New York : McGraw-Hill. PRIM-FIC C5648st

Various objects illustrate the concept of numbers one through ten. Begin with one (ship) and end with ten (10) jugglers.

Cowley, Joy. (1989). La casa de tío Totío. Bothell, WA : Wright Group. 468 C875ca

There are many things in uncle Totíos house, but only one uncle Totío. In Spanish.

Crews, Donald. (1986). Ten black dots. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC C9278TE

A counting book which shows what can be done with ten black dots--one can make a sun, two a fox's eyes, or eight the wheels of a train.

De Regniers, Beatrice Schenk. (1985). So many cats! New York : Clarion Books. PRIM-FIC D4312so

Counting verses explain how a family ended up with a dozen cats.

Eichenberg, Fritz. (1955). Dancing in the moon; counting rhymes. New York : Harcourt, Brace. PRIM-FIC E342DA

A variety of animals engaged in many different activities introduce the numbers from one to twenty.

Feelings, Muriel L. (1971). Moja means one; Swahili counting book. New York : Dial Press. 390 F295mo

The numbers one through ten in Swahili accompany two-page illustrations of various aspects of East African life.

Fehr, Howard F. (1964). If you can count to 10 ... New York : Holt, Rinehart and Winston. PRIM-FIC F2967IF

Counting games.

Fleming, Denise. (2005). The first day of winter. New York : Henry Holt. PRIM-FIC F5973fi

A snowman comes alive as the child building it adds pieces during the first ten days of winter-- 1 red hat, 2 blue mittens, 3 striped scarves, 4 prickly pinecones....

Françoise. (1951). Jeanne-Marie counts her sheep. New York : Scribner. PRIM-FIC F8255je

An introduction to numbers as Jeanne-Marie plans what to buy with the wool from the lambs her sheep will bear.

Gerth, Melanie. (2000). Ten little ladybugs. Santa Monica, CA : Piggy Toes Press. PRIM-FIC G3843te

Young ones will love learning to count backwards as they watch ten touchable ladybugs disappear one by one.

Giganti, Paul. (1992). Each orange had 8 slices : a counting book. New York : Greenwillow Books. 513.5 G459e

An illustrated introduction to counting and simple addition.

Giganti, Paul. (1988). How many snails? : a counting book. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC G4593H

A young child takes walks to different places and wonders about the amount and variety of things seen on the way.

Girnis, Margaret. (2001). 1, 2, 3 for you and me. Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman. 628.9 G525o

Photographs show children with Down syndrome in activities with objects corresponding to numbers one through twenty.

Grégoire, Caroline. (2004). Counting with Apollo. La Jolla, CA : Kane/Miller Book Publishers. 513.2 G819c

Apollo the dog counts from one beautiful tail to his ten teeth.

Guy, Ginger Foglesong. (1996). Fiesta!. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC G986F

Bilingual text describes a children’s party and provides practice counting in English and Spanish.

Harshman, Marc. (1993). Only one. New York : Cobblehill Books/Dutton. 513.2 H324o

At a country fair there are five hundred seeds in one pumpkin, ten cents in one dime, eight horses on one merry-go-round, four wheels on one wagon, and so on.

Hawkins, Colin. (1990). When I was one. London, England ; New York, N.Y., USA : Viking. PRIM-FIC H3933WH

A boy counts what he did or will do when he reaches ages 1-10.

Hoban, Tana. (1985). 1, 2, 3. New York : Greenwillow Books. 513 H681o

Two shoes, five fingers, ten toes--these are some of the familiar objects presented to be counted.

Hoban, Tana. (1987). 26 letters and 99 cents. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC H6816tw

Color photographs of letters, numbers, coins, and common objects introduce the alphabet, coinage, and the counting system.

Hoban, Tana. (1972). Count and see. New York : Macmillan. PRIM-FIC H6816co

Photographs of common objects and events illustrate the numbers one through one hundred.

Hutchins, Pat. (1982). 1 hunter. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC H9763ON

One hunter walks through the forest observed first by two elephants, then by three giraffes, etc.

Ipcar, Dahlov Zorach. (1959). Brown Cow Farm; a counting book. Garden City, NY : Doubleday. PRIM-FIC I644br

A counting book which tells of the animals on Brown Cow Farm, from one brown horse in a box stall, through twenty puppies, to one hundred goslings swimming in the marshes.

Keats, Ezra Jack, Illustrator. (1972, c1971). Over in the meadow. New York : Four Winds Press. PRIM-FIC O963ov

Verses describing the activities of various animals also illustrate the numbers one through ten. Text based on the original version by Olive A. Wadsworth.

Kitamura, Satoshi. (1986). When sheep cannot sleep, the counting book. New York : Farrar Straus Giroux. PRIM-FIC K622WH

Woolly can’t sleep so he wanders around counting things until he gets tired.

Leodhas. Sorche Nic. (1963). All in the morning early. New York : Holt, Rinehart, & Winston. PRIM-FIC L577A

In a retelling of an old Scottish story, a boy on his way to a mill picks up an interesting variety of followers.

Leuck, Laura. (1997). My baby brother has ten tiny toes. Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman. PRIM-FIC L652M

Introduces the numbers one to ten through the nose, eyes, shoes, and other possessions and body parts of a girl’s baby brother.

Limmer, Milly Jane. (1991). Where will you swim tonight? Niles, Ill. : A. Whitman. PRIM-FIC L7344wh

A bathtime counting book in which a girl grows a tail and swims along with one knobby seahorse, two smooth dolphins, and other sea creatures up to the number ten.

Markle, Sandra. (2009). How many baby pandas? New York : Walker & Co. 599.78 M346h

Looks at the eight panda pairs that were born at China's Wolong Giant Panda Breeding and Research Center in 2005, examining how they live, grow, and play and the steps that are being taken to prepare them for their release into the wild.

McGrath, Barbara Barbieri. (1997). The M&M's brand chocolate candies counting board book. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge Publishing. 513.2 M147m

"M&M's" chocloate candies are used to introduce children to the numbers 1 through ten on board pages.

McLeod, Emilie. (1961). One snail and me; a book of numbers and animals and a bathtub. Boston : Little, Brown. PRIM-FIC M1653on

A counting book with a nonsense story...about a child who shares her bath tub with one snail, two turtles, three ducks, and other wildlife. The creatures chosen become more and more absurd until there are nine hippos in there along with everybody else.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. (2004). Museum 123. New York : Little, Brown & Co. 513.2 M986

Learning to count with the help of art from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Morozumi, Atusko. (1990). One gorilla : a counting book. New York : Farrar, Straus & Giroux. PRIM-FIC M871ON

Someone is counting things they see and like, and one gorilla.

Moss, Lloyd. (1995). Zin! zin! zin! : a violin. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC M9132zi

Ten instruments take their parts one by one in a musical performance.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2006). Jack the builder. New York : HarperCollins. 513.2 M978j

A story about blocks and building introduces counting.

Nikola-Lisa, W. (1991). 1, 2, 3 Thanksgiving! Morton Grove, Ill. : A. Whitman. 513 N693o

A Thanksgiving counting book depicting the numbers one through ten through scenes of the holiday.

Pallotta, Jerry. (1992). The icky bug counting book. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. 513.2 P168i

Introduces the characteristics and activities of insects and other crawly creatures.

Rose, Deborah Lee. (2003). One nighttime sea. New York : Scholastic Press. 513.2 R795o

A counting book featuring nocturnal sea creatures, from one blue whale calf to ten turtle hatchlings, and back down to one seal pup. Includes facts about each of the twenty featured animals.

Scarry, Richard. (1975). Richard Scarry's Best counting book ever. New York : Random House. 513 S286bc

Introduces the numbers and counting from one to one hundred as Willy Bunny counts all the things he sees in one day.

Scillian, Devin. (2002). One nation : America by the numbers. Chelsea, MI : Sleeping Bear Press. 973 S416o

A counting book presenting various aspects of the United States, from the concept of one nation to the hundred men and women in the U.S. Senate.

Sper, Emily. (2001). Hanukkah : a counting book in English, Hebrew, and Yiddish. New York : Scholastic. 296.4 S749h

A radiant read-aloud book--with the symbols of Hanukkah presented to stunningeffect--teaches children to count to eight in three languages.

Stanek, Muriel. (1967). One, two, three for fun. Chicago : Albert Whitman. 796.1 S785o

Playing children introduce the numbers from one to five.

Sugita, Yutaka. (1971). Good night 1, 2, 3. New York : Scroll Press. PRIM-FIC S9473go

A child dreams of varying numbers of brightly colored objects from one to eleven, such as giraffes, umbrellas, and watermelon seeds.

Tafuri, Nancy. (1986). Who's counting. New York : Greenwillow Books. 513 T124w

Text and illustrations of a variety of animals introduce the numbers one through ten.

Testa, Fulvio. (1982). If you take a pencil. New York : Dial Press. PRIM-FIC T3418if

Describes how a pencil may be used to draw cats, birds, fingers, orange trees, and other objects, in quantities from two to twelve, interrelated in a fanciful fashion.

Tudor, Tasha. (1956). 1 is one. New York : Oxford University Press. PRIM-FIC T912ON

Each of the numbers one through twenty is illustrated by the author, who also wrote couplets linking every two numbers in succession.

Wahl, John. (1985). I can count the petals of a flower. Reston, VA : National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 513.2 W136i

Introduces the numbers one through sixteen and some basic mathematical concepts using the petals of a variety of flowers.

Walsh, Ellen Stoll. (1991). Mouse count. San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. PRIM-FIC W2243mc

Ten mice outsmart a hungry snake.

Wormell, Christopher. (2004). Teeth, tails & tentacles : an animal counting book. Philadelphia, PA : Running Press Kids. 513.21 W928t

The first portion of the work is a counting book covering the numbers one to twenty with block prints of animals. The second portion of the work has factual information concerning the animals.

Fractions Fractions

Ford, Henry Walter. (1965). Dr. Frick and his fractions. New York : Holt, Rinehart, & Winston. PRIM-FIC F6996dr

A magic show explains fractions.

Leedy, Loreen. (1994). Fraction action. New York : Holiday House. 513.2 L484F

Miss Prime and her animal students explore fractions by finding many examples in the world around them.

Mathews, Louise. (1979). Gator pie. New York : Dodd, Mead. PRIM-FIC M4295ga

Two alligators consider dividing their pie into halves, thirds, fourths, eighths, and hundredths.

McElligott, Matthew. (2009). The lion's share. New York : Walker & Co. PRIM-FIC M141Li

Ant is honored to receive an invitation to lion’s annual dinner party, but is shocked when the other guests behave rudely and then accuse her of thinking only of herself. Story and illustrated end papers introduce division into fractions, showing that half of a whole is one-half, half of that is one-fourth, continuing to 1/128th. The second half of the story shows doubling or multiplication by two as each animal decides to bake twice as many cakes as his predecessor, ending with 256 cakes from the elephant.

McMillan, Bruce. (1991). Eating fractions. New York : Scholastic. 513.2 M1674E

Food is cut into halves, quarters, and thirds to illustrate how parts make a whole. Simple recipes included.

Murphy, Stuart J. (1996). Give me half! New York, NY : HarperCollins Publishers. 513.2 M978g

Introduces the concept of halves using a simple rhyming story about a brother and sister who do not want to share their food.

Nagda, Ann Whitehead. (2004). Polar bear math : learning about fractions from Klondike and Snow. New York : Henry Holt & Co. 513.2 N147p

Uses charts and recipes for bear milk prepared for two baby polar bears born in a zoo to teach about fractions.

Pallotta, Jerry. (2002). Apple fractions. New York : Scholastic. 513.2 P168a

Describes a variety of apples and uses them to introduce fractions.

Pinczes, Elinor J. (2001). Inchworm and a half. Boston, Mass. : Houghton Mifflin Co. PRIM-FIC P6479in

Several small worms use their varying lengths to measure the vegetables in a garden.

General General

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1987-1989). Anno's math games. New York : Philomel Books. 793.7 A615a

Picture puzzles, games, and simple activities introduce the mathematical concepts of multiplication, sequence and ordinal numbering, measurement, and direction.

Axelrod, Amy. (1997). Pigs in the pantry : fun with math and cooking. New York, N.Y. : Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC A969PF

Mr. Pig and the piglets try to cook Mrs. Pigs favorite dish to cheer her up when she's sick. Includes a recipe for chili.

Axelrod, Amy. (1996). Pigs on a blanket. New York, NT : Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC A969P

Because the Pig family has so many delays in getting to the beach, they are in for a big disappointment when they're finally ready to ride the waves.

Markel, Michelle. (2009). Tyrannosaurus math. Berkeley, Calif. : Tricycle Press. 513 M345t

From the moment Tyrannosaurus Math (T-Math for short) is hatched, he views the world in mathematical terms. He begins with simple addition (how many siblings have also hatched) and proceeds through such skills as grouping (counting a herd of triceratops, though he's not yet old enough to consume them), ordering and comparing (who ate the most dragonflies), and geometric shapes (is that meteor a sphere or a cube?).

Martin, Bill. (1987). Knots on a counting rope. New York : H. Holt. PRIM-FIC M379KN

A grandfather and his blind grandson, Boy-Strength-of-Blue-Horses, reminisce about the young boy's birth, his first horse, and an exciting horse race.

Scieszka, Jon. (1995). Math curse. New York, N.Y. : Viking. PRIM-FIC S4163ma

When the teacher tells her class that they can think of almost everything as a math problem, one student acquires a math anxiety which becomes a real curse.

Slobodkina, Esphyr. (1947). Caps for sale; a tale of a peddler, some monkeys and their monkey business. New York : W. R. Scott. PRIM-FIC S6343cap

A band of mischievous monkeys steals every one of a peddler's caps while he takes a nap under a tree.

Stamper, Judith Bauer. (1998). Tic-tac-toe : three in a row. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC S7836 TI

A boy learns how to play tic-tac-toe and improves his skill playing with a friend. Includes related activities.

Williams, Vera B. (1986). Cherries and cherry pits. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC W7278CHE

Bidemmi draws pictures and tells stories about cherries.

Geometry Geometry

Axelrod, Amy. (1998). Pigs on the ball : fun with math and sports. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.  PRIM-FIC A969PHE

The Pig family visits a miniature golf course and learns about shapes, angles, and geometry.

Bendick, Jeanne. (1962). Take shapes, lines, letters; new horizons in mathematics. New York : Whittlesey House. 513 B4585t

An introduction to some of the basic concepts in geometry and where they are met in everyday life, including sections on mathematics in art or music, and the use of letters and charts in mathematics.

Burns, Marilyn. (1994). The greedy triangle. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC B967GR

Dissatisfied with its shape, a triangle keeps asking the local shape shifter to add more lines and angles until it doesn't know which side is up.

Carle, Eric. (1992). Draw me a star. New York : Philomel Books. PRIM-FIC C278DR

An artist's drawing for a star begins the creation of an entire universe around him as each successive pictured object requests that he draw more.

Children's Television Workshop. (1970). The Sesame street book of shapes. New York : Preschool Press; distributed in association with Time-Life Books. PRIM-FIC S4933

An introduction to the circle, square, rectangle, and triangle showing how these shapes can be found everywhere.

Friedman, Aileen. (1994). A cloak for the dreamer. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC F9114CL

When a tailor asks each of his three sons to make a cloak for the Archduke, the third son's design reveals his desire to travel the world rather than follow his father's footsteps.

Hoban, T. (2000). Cubes, cones, cylinders & spheres. New York : Greenwillow Books. 516 H681c

Photographs of all kinds of familiar objects depict a variety of shapes, including cubes, cones, and spheres.

Hoban, T. (1998). So many circles, so many squares. New York : Greenwillow Books. 516.15 H681s

The geometric concepts of circles and squares are shown in photographs of wheels, signs, pots, and other familiar objects.

Hopkinson, Deborah. (1994). Sweet Clara and the freedom quilt. New York : Knopf. PRIM-FIC H7973sw

A young slave stitches a quilt with a map pattern which guides her to freedom in the north.

Juster, N. (1963). The dot and the line; a romance in lower mathematics. New York : Random House. 510 J96d

A line falls in love with a dot who only has eyes for a foolish squiggle. The line, however, has no trouble showing his superiority. Explores two plane geometric relationships

Leedy, Loreen. (2000). Mapping Penny's world. New York : Henry Holt. PRIM-FIC L484ma

After learning about maps in school, Lisa maps all the favorite places of her dog Penny.

Maccarone, Grace. (1997). Three pigs, one wolf, and seven magic shapes. New York : Scholastic. PRIM FIC M123 TH

Tells the story of three pigs who acquire some magic shapes, which they use for various purposes, some smart and some not so smart. Includes a section with related activities.

Micklethwait, Lucy. (2004). I spy shapes in art. New York : Greenwillow Books. 701.8 M625i

Presents objects with the shape of a heart, a triangle, a square and other shapes through paintings by such artists as Magritte, Escher, and Matisse.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2001). Captain Invincible and the space shapes. New York : Harper Collins Publishers. 516 M978c

While piloting his spaceship through the skies, Captain Invincible encounters three-dimensional shapes, including cubes, cylinders, and pyramids.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2004). Treasure map. New York : HarperCollins. 912.01 M978t

An old map leads the members of the Elm Street Kids' Club to a buried time capsule.

Neuschwander, Cindy. (2006). Sir Cumference and the Isle of Immeter : a math adventure. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. PRIM-FIC N495sii

Discusses young Per taking a mathmatical adventure.

Neuschwander, Cindy. (2003). Sir Cumference and the sword in the cone. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. 516 N495s

Sir Cumference, Radius, and Sir Vertex search for Edgecalibur, the sword that King Arthur has hidden in a geometric solid.

Tompert, Ann. (1990). Grandfather Tang's story. New York : Crown Publishers. PRIM-FIC T6623gr

Grandfather tells a story about shape-changing fox fairies who try to best each other until a hunter brings danger to both of them.

MeasurementMeasurement

Adler, David A. (1999). How tall, how short, how far away. New York : Holiday House. 530.8 A237

Introduces several measuring systems such as the Egyptian system, the inch-pound system, and the metric system.

Allen, Pamela. (1983). Who sank the boat? New York : Coward-McCann. PRIM-FIC A4284WH  

The reader is invited to guess who causes the boat to sink when five animal friends of varying sizes decide to go for a row.

Borden, Louise. (2004). Sea clocks : the story of longitude. New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books. 526 B728s

While telling the story of John Harrison, an English clockmaker, whose sea clocks changed the world, this book also explains the problem of longitude and its solution in terms children can understand.

Clement, Rod. (1991). Counting on Frank. Milwaukee : G. Stevens Children's Books. 513.5 C626c

A boy and his dog present amusing counting, size comparison, and mathematical facts.

Dash, Joan. (2000). The longitude prize. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 681.1 D229L

The story of John Harrison, inventor of watches and clocks, who spent forty years working on a time-machine which could be used to accurately determine longitude at sea.

Hightower, Susan. (1997). Twelve snails to one lizard : a tale of mischief and measurement. New York : Simon & Schuster Books of Young Readers.
PRIM-FIC H6388tw

Bubba the bullfrog helps Milo the beaver build a dam by explaining to him the concepts of inches, feet, and yards.

Lasky, Kathryn. (2003). The man who made time travel. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 526.6 L345m

Describes the need for sailors to be able to determine their position at sea and the efforts of John Harrison, an eighteenth century man who spent his life refining instruments to enable them to do this.

Ling, Bettina. (1997). The fattest, tallest, biggest snowman ever. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC L755fa

Two children use non-standard measurements, such as paper clips, sticks, and their arms, to determine who has built the biggest snowman. Includes measurement activities and games.

Lionni, Leo. (1960). Inch by inch. New York : I. Obolensky. PRIM-FIC L763IN

To keep from being eaten, an inchworm measures a robin's tail, a flamingo's neck, a toucan's beak, a heron's legs, and a nightingale's song.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2002). Bigger, better, best! New York : HarperCollins Publishers. 516 M978b

In their family's new house, Jenny, Jeff, and Jill use a simple geometry concept to calculate area and prove, once and for all, whose room is bigger.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2005). Hamster champs. New York : HarperCollins. 516 M978h

Three hamsters try to elude a dangerous cat.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2004). Mighty Maddie. New York : HarperCollins. 389.1 M978m

As Maddie cleans up her room, she learns how to compare the weights of various objects.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2002). Racing around. New York : HarperCollins Publishers. 530.8 M978r

Demonstrates the math concept perimeter with children riding their bikes.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2004). Tally O'Malley. New York : HarperCollins. 513.211 M978t

On a car trip to the beach, the O'Malley family children compete by playing games together.

Myller, Rolf. (1962). How big is a foot? New York : Atheneum. PRIM-FIC M9974HO

Thrown in jail because the bed he made for the Queen is too small, an apprentice comes up with a more accurate way of measuring size.

Robbins, Ken. (2010). For good measure : the ways we say how much, how far, how heavy, how big, how old. New York, NY : Roaring Brook Press. 530.8 R634f

The mile gets its name from the term mille passus, which means "a thousand paces." The abbreviation for pound (lb.) comes from the Latin libra pondo. Feet, pounds, quarts, miles: these are words we use every day. But where did they originate, and what do they actually mean?

Schwartz, David M. (2003). Millions to measure. New York : HarperCollins. 530.8 S399m

Marvelosissimo the Magician explains the development of standard units of measure, and shows the simplicity of calculating length, height, weight, and volume using the metric system.

Wells, Robert E. (1993). Is a blue whale the biggest thing there is? Morton Grove, Ill. : A. Whitman. 530.8 W455i

Illustrates the concept of big, bigger, and biggest by comparing the physical measurements of such large things as a blue whale, a mountain, a star, and the universe.

Wells, Robert E. (1995). What's smaller than a pygmy shrew? Morton Grove, Ill. : A. Whitman. 539 W455w

A thought-proving journey from the mighty pygmy shrew to microorganisms and molecules

Money Money

Axelrod, Amy. (1994). Pigs will be pigs. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC A969PW

The hungry Pig family learns about money and buying power as they turn the house upside down looking for enough money to buy dinner at the local restaurant.

Blume, Judy. (2002). Double Fudge. New York: Dutton Children's Books. INTR-FIC B658DO

His younger brother's obsession with money and the discovery of long-lost cousins Flora and Fauna provide many embarrassing moments for twelve-year-old Peter.

Flake, Sharon. (2001). Money hungry. New York: Jump at the Sun/Hyperion Books For Children. INTR-FIC F5765MO

All thirteen-year-old Raspberry can think of is making money so that she and her mother never have to worry about living on the streets again.

Leedy, Loreen. (2002). Follow the money! New York : Holiday House. 332.4 L484f

A quarter describes all the ways it is used from the time it is minted until it is taken back to a bank.

Jenkins, Emily. (2012). Lemonade in winter : a book about two kids counting money. (Illustrated by G. Brian Karas). New York : Schwartz & Wade Books.
PRIM-FIC J52Le

Pauline and her brother John-John set up a stand to sell lemonade, limeade, and lemon-limeade one cold, wintry day, then try to attract customers as Pauline adds up their earnings.

Mollel, Tololwa M. (1999). My rows and piles of coins. New York : Clarion Books. PRIM-FIC M726MY

A Tanzanian boy saves his coins to buy a bicycle so that he can help his parents carry goods to market, but then he discovers that in spite of all he has saved, he still does not have enough money.

Nagel, Karen Berman. (1996). The lunch line. New York : Scholastic Inc. PRIM-FIC N1475Lu

In the school cafeteria at lunchtime, Kim eyes all the tasty food and tries to figure out what she can buy with her dollar.

Schwartz, David M. (1989). If you made a million. New York : Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books. 332.024 S299i

Describes the various forms which money can take, including coins, paper money, and personal checks, and how it can be used to make purchases, pay off loans, or build interest in the bank.

Williams, Rozanne Lanczak. (2001). The coin counting book. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. 513.2 W726c

Rhyming verses, with illustrations, for children to review counting the various denominations of American coins.

Williams, Vera B. (1982). A chair for my mother. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC W7278CHA

A child, her waitress mother, and her grandmother save dimes to buy a comfortable armchair after all their furniture is lost in a fire.

Zimelman, Nathan. (1992). How the second grade got $8,205.50 to visit the Statue of Liberty. Morton Grove, Ill. : A. Whitman. PRIM-FIC Z71H

Chronicles the triumphs and setbacks of the second grade as they try a variety of schemes to raise money for a trip to the Statue of Liberty.

 

Number SenseNumbers

Aker, Suzanne. (1990). What comes in 2's, 3's, & 4's? New York : Aladdin Paperbacks. 513.5 A314W

Introduces the numbers two, three, and four by enumerating the ways in which they occur in everyday life, from your two eyes and two arms to the four seasons of the year.

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1983). Anno’s mysterious multiplying jar. New York, NY : Philomel Books. 512.7 A615a

Simple text and pictures introduce the mathematical concept of factorials.

Base, Graeme. (1989). The eleventh hour : a curious mystery. New York : Abrams. INTR-FIC B2994EL

An elephant's eleventh birthday party is marked by eleven games preceding the banquet to be eaten at the eleventh hour; but when the time to eat arrives, the birthday feast has disappeared. The reader is invited to guess the thief.

Burns, Marilyn. (1996). How many feet? How many tails? : a book of math riddles. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC B967 HO

As two children take a walk with their grandfather, they use their counting skills to help answer a series of animal riddles. Includes related activities.

Dickerson, Susan. (1992). The daily dozen. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. Folio PRIM-FIC D5496d

Children march in rows to illustrate multiples of twelve.

Friedman, Aileen. (1994). The king's commissioners. New York : Scholastic.  PRIM-FIC F9114KI

While trying to keep track of his many royal commissioners, the kind learns some new ways of counting.

Gág, Wanda. (1928). Millions of cats. New York : Coward-McCann, Inc. PRIM-FIC G132M

How can an old man and his wife select one cat from a choice of millions and trillions?

Giganti, Paul. (1988). How many snails? : a counting book. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC G4593H

A young child takes walks to different places and wonders about the amount and variety of things seen on the way.

Juster, Norton. (1961). The phantom tollbooth. New York : Epstein & Carrol; distributed by Random House. INTR-FIC J96PH  

A journey through a land where Milo learns the importance of words and numbers provides a cure for his boredom.

Losi, Carol A. (1997). The 512 ants on Sullivan Street. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC L8794 FI

In this rhyming, cumulative story, the number of ants doubles each time they take a new treat from a picnic lunch.

Maccarone, Grace. (1998). Monster math picnic. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC M123 MMP

The number of monsters engaged in various activities at a picnic always adds up to ten. Includes related activities.

McGrath, Barbara Barbieri. (1998). More M&M's brand chocolate candies math. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge Publishing. 513.2 M147mo

Rhyming text and illustrations use candy to teach mathematical skills and concepts such as estimation, graph interpretation, division, multiplication, factoring, and problem solving.

McKissack, Pat. (1991). A million fish-- more or less. New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House. PRIM-FIC M1584MIL

A boy learns that the truth is often stretched on the Bayou Clapateaux, and gets the chance to tell his own version of a bayou tale when he goes fishing.

McNamara, Margaret. (2007). How many seeds in a pumpkin? New York : Schwartz & Wade Books. PRIM-FIC M169ho 

Charlie, the smallest child in his first grade class, is amazed to discover that of the three pumpkins his teacher brings to school, the tiniest one has the most seeds.

Meltzer Kleinhenz, Sydnie. (1997). More for me. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC M5288 MO

When a little boy insists he wants more of everything served to him for breakfast, his sister obliges by rearranging what he has. Includes section with related activities.

Merriam, Eve. (1993). 12 ways to get to 11. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. 513.2 M568t

Uses ordinary experiences to present twelve combinations of numbers that add up to eleven. Example: At the circus, six peanut shells and five pieces of popcorn.

Moore, Inga. (1991). Six-dinner Sid. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC M8223SI

Sid the cat plays the pet of six different owners on Aristole Street so he can get six dinners every night.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2003). Less than zero. New York : HarperCollins Publishers. 513 M978L

While trying to save enough money to buy a new ice scooter, Perry the Penguin learns about managing his money and about negative numbers.

Murphy, Stuart J. (2001). Missing mittens. New York : HarperCollins. 513.2 M978mi

As a farmer tries to find the correct number of mittens for his various farmyard animals, the reader is introduced to odd and even numbers.

Murphy, Stuart J. (1998). The penny pot. New York : HarperCollins. 513.2 M978pe

The face painting booth at the school fair provides plenty of opportunities to count combinations of coins adding up to fifty.

Neuschwander, Cindy. (2009). Sir Cumference and all the king’s tens : a math adventure. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. PRIM-FIC N495sia

When Sir Cumference and his wife, Lady Di of Ameter, host a massive surprise birthday party for the king, they must figure out a way to quickly count all the guests who are in attendance.

Otoshi, Kathryn. (2010). Zero. San Rafael, CA : Ko Kids Books. PRIM-FIC O887ze

Zero, dismayed by her big, empty, roundness, tries to force herself into the shape of the much-admired One, but must finally accept that she can only be Zero.

Riley, Kana. (1992). The pond. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. Folio PRIM-FIC R5735p

A story using the numbers one to ten, one hundred, and one million.

Rocklin, Joanne. (1997). The case of the missing birthday party. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC R6834 CA

Liz the Whiz & Co. help a neighbor find her way to a birthday party by using their knowledge of place value.

Schwartz, David M. (1998). G is for googol : a math alphabet book. Berkeley, Calif. : Tricycle Press. 510 S411g

Explains the meaning of mathematical terms which begin with the different letters of the alphabet from abacus, binary, and cubit to zillion.

Tang, Greg. (2004). Math fables : lessons that count. New York : Scholastic Press. 513.2 T164m

A series of rhymes about animals introduces counting and grouping numbers, as well as examples of such behaviors as cooperation, friendship, and appreciation.

Wells, Robert E. (2000). Can you count to a googol? Morton Grove, Ill. : Albert Whitman. 513.5 W455c

Introduces the concepts of very large numbers, up to a googol, and multiples of ten.

Operations Operations

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1995). Anno's magic seeds. New York : Philomel Books. 513.4 A6156F

The reader is asked to perform a series of mathematical operations integrated into the story of a lazy man who plants magic seeds and reaps an increasingly abundant harvest.

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1987-1989). Anno's math games. New York : Philomel Books. 793.7 A615a

Picture puzzles, games, and simple activities introduce the mathematical concepts of multiplication, sequence and ordinal numbering, measurement, and direction.

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1983). Anno’s mysterious multiplying jar. New York, NY : Philomel Books. 512.7 A615a   

Simple text and pictures introduce the mathematical concept of factorials.

Hutchins, Pat. (1986). The doorbell rang. New York : Greenwillow Books. PRIM-FIC H9763do

Each time the doorbell rings, there are more people who have come to share Ma's wonderful cookies.

Jenkins, Emily. (2012). Lemonade in winter : a book about two kids counting money. (Illustrated by G. Brian Karas). New York : Schwartz & Wade Books.
PRIM-FIC J52Le

Pauline and her brother John-John set up a stand to sell lemonade, limeade, and lemon-limeade one cold, wintry day, then try to attract customers as Pauline adds up their earnings.

LaRochelle, David. (2010). 1+1=5 : and other unlikely additions. New York, NY : Sterling Pub. Co. 513.2 L328o

Colorful illustrations and unusual calculations encourage children to think about numbers in a creative way. 1+1=14? One ant and one spider equals 14 legs.

McElligott, Matthew. (2007). Bean thirteen. New York : G. P. Putnam’s Sons. PRIM-FIC M141be

Two bugs, Ralph and Flora, try to divide thirteen beans so that the unlucky thirteenth bean disappears, but they soon discover that the math is not so easy.

McElligott, Matthew. (2009). The lion's share. New York : Walker & Co. PRIM-FIC M141Li

Ant is honored to receive an invitation to lion’s annual dinner party, but is shocked when the other guests behave rudely and then accuse her of thinking only of herself. Story and illustrated end papers introduce division into fractions, showing that half of a whole is one-half, half of that is one-fourth, continuing to 1/128th. The second half of the story shows doubling or multiplication by two as each animal decides to bake twice as many cakes as his predecessor, ending with 256 cakes from the elephant.

Murphy, Stuart J. (1998). Animals on board. New York : HarperCollins Publishers. 513.2 M978an

Introduces simple addition through a rhyming text about animals being delivered for a merry-go-round.

Neuschwander, Cindy. (1998). Amanda Bean's amazing dream : a mathematical story. New York : Scholastic Press. PRIM-FIC N495AM

Amanda loves to count everything, but not until she has an amazing dream does she finally realize that being able to multiply will help her count things faster.

Pinczes, Elinor J. (1993). One hundred hungry ants. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. PRIM-FIC P647ON

One hundred hungry ants head towards a picnic to get yummies for their tummies, but stops to change their line formation, showing different divisions of one hundred, cause them to lose both time and food in the end.

Pinczes, Elinor J. (1995). A remainder of one. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. PRIM-FIC P647RE

When the queen of the bugs demands that her army march in even lines, Private Joe divides the marchers into more and more lines so that he will not be left out of the parade.

Rocklin, Joanne. (1997). One hungry cat. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC R6834 ON

Tom the cat tries to evenly divide the snacks he has baked for himself and two friends, but after gobbling up a few treats, Tom is faced with a new division problem. Includes division activities.

Probability Probability

Axelrod, Amy. (2000). Pigs at odds : fun with math and games. New York : Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC A969PC

While trying their luck at various games at the county fair, members of the Pig family find out what the odds are that they will go home as winners. Includes an explanation of odds and probability.

Einhorn, Edward. (2008). A very improbable story. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. PRIM-FIC E35ve

Waking up one morning to find a talking cat on his head, Ethan is informed that the cat will not leave until he - Ethan - wins a game of probability.

Holtzman, Caren. (1997). No fair!  New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC H7585NO

Two children play several games of chance trying to figure out what is mathematically fair.

Leedy, Loreen. (2007). It's probably Penny. New York : Henry Holt. PRIM-FIC L484it

Lisa has a weekend homework problem. She must make a list of thing she thinks will happen, might happen, can’t happen. And what is it that keeps things happening? Why it’s probably that busy Boston terrier named Penny!

Murphy, Stuart J. (2005). Same old horse. New York : HarperCollins. 519.2 M978s

Hankie always does the same things at the same time. He even sneezes on schedule. The other horses tease him. What a bore! Hankie's determined to prove that he can be unpredictable if he wants to -- but can he? Or will he just end up being the same old Hankie? Horses, humor, and a great big sneeze all combine to explain how to look at past events and make predictions about the future, an important element of logical thinking.

Van Allsburg, Chris. (1981). Jumanji. Boston : Houghton Mifflin Co. PRIM-FIC V217J

Left on their own for an afternoon, two bored and restless children find more excitement than they bargained for in a mystical jungle adventure bored game.

RatiosRatios

Clement, Rod. (1991). Counting on Frank. Milwaukee : G. Stevens Children's Books. 513.5 C626c

A boy and his dog present amusing counting, size comparison, and mathematical facts.

Ellis, Julie. (2010). Pythagoras and the ratios : a math adventure. Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge. 516.22 E47p

An ancient Greek boy, Pythagoras, helps his cousins produce pleasant music when he adjusts the mathematical ratios between the part of their pipes and lyres, knowledge he would later use to become a famous philosopher.

Schwartz, David M. (2005). If dogs were dinosaurs. New York : Scholastic Press. 513.2 S99if

"Explores the concepts of ratio and proportion by growing or shrinking various objects by the same amounts"--Provided by publisher. If your dog were the size of a dinosaur, his dinner would fill your bedroom! If the moon were the size of a marble, earth would fit in your hands! If your submarine sandwich was as big as its name, the pickle would be as big as a life raft! Mighty math-man David Schwartz’s amazing examples of relative size, and James Warhola’s hilarious, literal depictions make these mind-bending math concepts crystal clear and tons of fun. Concise, easy-to-follow back matter provides equations that show just how readers can solve these fascinating, outrageous proportional problems!

Schwartz, David M. (1999). If you hopped like a frog. New York : Scholastic Press. 513.2 S399i

Introduces the concept of ratio by comparing what humans would be able to do if they had bodies like different animals.

Time Time

Adler, Irving. (1955). Time in your life. New York : J. Day Co. 529 A237t

Discusses all aspects of time, at a level young people can understand.

Anno, Mitsumasa. (1987). Anno's sundial. New York : Philomel Books. 529 A615a

Explains how the earth's movements around the sun and the resulting movement of shadows have been used to tell time. Includes illustrations that pop up or fold out to demonstrate how sundials work.

Axelrod, Amy. (1996). Pigs on a blanket. New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. PRIM-FIC A969P

Because the Pig family has so many delays in getting to the beach, they are in for a big disappointment when they're finally ready to ride the waves.

Behn, Harry. (1950). All kinds of time. New York : Harcourt, Brace. PRIM-FIC B4197al

Using humor and poetry, the author explains the meaning of Time to very young children.

Carle, Eric. (1997). The grouchy ladybug. New York : T.Y. Crowell Co. PRIM-FIC C278G

A grouchy ladybug, looking for a fight, challenges everyone everyone she meets regardless of their size or strength.

Gribbin, Mary. (2000). Time & space. New York : DK Publishing. 530.11 G846t

Details the discoveries and latest research that have furthered our understanding of the universe.

Hutchins, H. J. (2007). A second is a hiccup : a child's book of time. 529 H974s

Explains the concept of time, from a second to an hour, from a day to a year.

Hutchins, Pat. (1994). Clocks and more clocks. New York : Aladdin Books ; Toronto : Mexwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International. PRIM-FIC H9763CL

Not one of Mr. Higgins' four clocks kept the correct time until the Clockmaster assured him they were all correct.

Koscielniak, Bruce. (2004). About time : A first look at time and clocks. Boston : Houghton Mifflin. 529.7 K86a

Describes the concept of time and how it has been measured throughout history, using water clocks, sundials, calendars, and atomic vibrations.

Kummer, Patricia K. (2005). The calendar. New York : Franklin Watts. 529 K96c

What is a calendar? -- Early methods of counting days, seasons, and years -- People who helped develop the modern calendar -- Development of the modern calendar -- Importance of the calendar -- Calendars’s continuing development -- Timeline

Maccarone, Grace. (1997). Monster math school time. New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC M123 MMS

From the time they get up at seven in the morning until they go to bed at eight o'clock at night, monsters spend a busy day, especially at school. Includes related activities.

MacMillan, D.M. (2003). The curse of Rafferty McGill. Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman. INTR-FIC M1674cu

When a leprechaun grants Ryan O'Connor's wish one St. Patrick's Day, Ryan must find a way to grant the leprechaun's wish in return or his piano teacher, her house, and another student will be gone forever.

McGuire, Richard. (1994). Night becomes day. New York : Viking. PRIM-FIC M148N

The progress of time is illustrated by a sequence of objects and themes, including stream/river/ocean and street/highway/bridge.

Mueller, Virginia. (1991). Monster goes to school. Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman. PRIM-FIC M9476mog

At school Monster learns about time, drawing a clock with pictures that represent his day.

Schneider, Herman. (1952). Follow the sunset. Garden City, NY : Doubleday. PRIM-FIC S3588fo

"Where does the sun go when it sets?" "What makes the night come after the day?" Here, in this book, we "follow the sunset" to find the answers to these and other such questions.

Slater, Teddy. (1996). Just a minute! New York : Scholastic. PRIM-FIC S6318 JU

A young boy learns how important it is to know just how long a minute is. Includes a section with related activities.

Warner, Gertrude Chandler. (2001). The secret under the tree. Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman & Co. PRIM-FIC W28SEC

When Benny decides to dig a hole in the back yard, Grandfather gives him an old map that leads to a special discovery.

Wells, Robert E. (2002). How do you know what time it is? Morton Grove, IL : Albert Whitman. 529.7 W455h

Covering the history of measuring time with funny and interesting examples and illustrations, Wells takes readers back in time visiting the ancient Egyptians, who were the first civilization to keep track of time. Fast forwarding through the centuries, the author explains how the moon was used to keep track of months, and how the Julian calendar came to be.

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