February 19, 2002


Chapter 3

Morality Beyond Agreement: Moral Action within Moral Conflict

[URL: Chapter3]


Introduction

 

The Agreement Problem: Pragmatic Limits of Empathy, the Persistence of Disagreement, and the Use of Force

            I          The Agreement Problem

            II         Why Is It a “Problem”? Consequences of the Agreement Problem

                        A         The use of force and the abandonment of morality

                        B         Case study (or maybe just an anecdote)

                        C         Encouraging stubbornness and game-playing

            III        Existential Origins of the Agreement Problem

                        A         Natural limits of empathy

                        B         Variation in senses of the Good

                        C         Decisions made willy-nilly

                        D         Distress patterns and painful emotion

            IV       Summary

 

The World Is Imperfect, But That’s Just the Way It Is; No One Is to Blame

            I          Introduction / Synopsis

            II         Imperfection as an existential condition

            III        This is not the same as ignoring imperfection.

                        A         Case study: “Love the sinner; hate the sin”

                        B         Case study: “Life is not fair”

            IV       The Perfection Problem: The Illusions of Blameworthiness and Perfectability and the Harm of Pursuing Personal Perfection

 

Facing the Agreement Problem in a Second Moment of Moral Judgment

            I          Introduction

            II         Second-order Criteria for Decisions under Disagreement

            III        Friendship When Friendship Fails: Choosing and Still Loving; Learning Humility and Detaching Oneself


Beyond the Second Moment?

            I          Persistent Disagreement Beyond the Second Moment

            II         Grasping the Nettle of Solidarity

            III        A Tragic and Joyful Existence: The Universe, Synchronicity, and Prayer


The Motivation Problem Reconsidered

            I          xx