Home    Cultural    India      Methods     Women

 

Anthropology 5626 Instructor: Sharon Kemp

DEVELOPMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY Office: 211 Cina, Ph. 6110

Fall Quarter 1998 Office Hours: 1-2 TTh and

1000-1140 TTh, Cina 214 by appointment.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Theoretical perspectives in anthropology from mid-19th century to the present; examination of several major theorists central to the development of the discipline.

 

PREREQUISITES

Anth 1604 (Cultural Anthropology) and 70 cr., or permission.

 

OBJECTIVES

To survey the historical development of anthropological thought.

To review this development in relation to western intellectual history.

To present and critically examine the major types of anthropological theory.

To introduce some of the current trends in theoretical orientations.

 

AUDIENCE SERVED BY THE COURSE

Students who are majors or minors in anthropology. Upper division or graduate students who are seeking a more intensive exposure to the nature of anthropology as a discipline.

 

REQUIRED READINGS

Bohannan and Glazer (eds.). High points in Anthropology , 2nd ed. (B&G)

McGee and Warms. Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History (M&W)

Chapter assignments always include chapter and/or section introductions.

Selected Additional Readings, to be assigned

 

Recommended Reading

There are a number of books in which the various theoretical approaches and theorists are discussed and critiqued. The authors represent different theoretical approaches, so it would be a good idea to look at more than one. Some of these commentaries have been used in this course in the past. Students find them particularly useful for building class presentations and clarifying difficult ideas. You may also want to look at complete works. For example, while reading Morgan’s "Ethnical Periods" (M&W) and "Ancient Society" (B&G) it is instructive to look at their context in his book, Ancient Society, from which these excerpts are taken. Many of these books are also in the library.

 

Suggested Commentaries:

Barrett, Anthropology: A Student Guide to Theory and Method

Clifford and Marcus, Writing Culture

Marcus and Fischer, Anthropology as Cultural Critique

Harris, The Rise of Anthropological Theory

Honigmann, The Development of Anthropological Ideas

Kaplan and Manners, Culture Theory

Kuper, Adam Anthropologists and Anthropology

Lett, The Human Enterprise

Manners and Kaplan, Theory in Anthropology

Voget, A History of Ethnology

 

EVALUATION AND GRADING

Participation (and its quality) in seminar discussions. 30% 60 pts.

Panel Presentation and Paper 20% 40 pts.

Assignments of selected readings. 30% 80 pts.

includes 5 written essays and 1 class presentation

Final Examination 20% 40 pts.

 

SPECIAL FACILITIES AND/OR ARRANGEMENTS

Individuals who have any disability, either permanent or temporary, which might affect their ability to perform in this class are encouraged to inform the instructor at the start of the quarter. Adaptations of methods, materials or testing may be made as required.

 

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING SCHEDULE

 

_ Class Presentation

ΠPapers Due

 

WEEK DATE TOPIC READINGS
I, II, III 1/2

F

O

U

N

D

A

T

I

O

N

S

 

9/8-

9-22

 

 

 

 

Introduction

Topics:

The Early Years

Gender in Anthropology

Methodological Issues

Videos: Walter B. Spencer; William Rivers; Franz Boas; Margaret Mead; Bronislaw Malinowski; E.E. Evans-Pritchard

B&G: Preface and Intro

M&W: Preface and Intro

-----------------------------------

A. Evolution

B&G: 1-78; M&W: 1-65

B. American Cultural Anthropology (Historical Particularism)

B&G: 79-206; M&W 128-153, 202-220

C. Sociological and Functionalist Thought

B&G: 229-316; M&W: 83-114; 154-201

III 1/2 9/24

 

 

 

 

_Evolution

Presentation and Discussion

 

 

 

 

IV

9/29

 

10/1

 

 

 

 

_Historical Particularism

Presentation and Discussion

_Functionalism

Presentation and Discussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V

VARI-

A-

TION

 

10/6

 

 

10/8

 

 

 

Œ

_Cultural Ecology

Steward and White

Sahlins and Rappaport

 

 

B&G: 317-357

M&W: 221-258;296-309

 

 

 

 

VI

10/13

 

 

10/15

 



_Cultural Materialism

Marvin Harris

Ž

Ethnoscience

Conklin and Tyler

_Structuralism

Levi-Strauss and Leach

B&G: 377-403

M&W: 282-296

 

 

M&W: 345-366

 

B&G: 422-458, Skim Asdiwal; M&W: 310-344

VII

 

MOD-ERN

10/20

 

10/22

 

 

Levi-Strauss and Leach

 



_Symbolic/Interpretive

Douglas, Turner and Geertz

 

 

 

B&G: 501-552;

M&W: 430-479

VIII 10/27

 

10/29

 

Turner and Geertz

 



_Feminist Critique

Slocum, Ortner and Llewelyn-

Davies

 

 

 

 

 

M&W: 391-429

IX

POST

MOD-

ERN

11/3

11/5

Slocum, Ortner

_Postmodernism

Rosaldo and Crapanzano

 

 

 

M&W: 480-512

 

X

11/10

11/12

Appadurai

Defining a Position

Discussion and Review

 

 

 

 

B&G: 553

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FINAL EXAM, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1200-1355

For the second and third sections of the quarter, there are five required written assignments and one class presentation to be selected in the following manner: If you give the class presentation which introduces a theoretical perspective, you will not write a synopsis for the theorist holding that point of view.

Example: _Cultural Ecology Steward or White

You will select only one of the three--cultural ecology, Steward or White

 

Presentation Theorist

_ 9/24 Evolution

_ 9/29 Historical Particularism

_ 10/1 Functionalism Œ10/6 Paradigmatic Paper

_10/6 Cultural Ecology  10/13 Steward or White

_10/13 Cultural Materialism Ž 10/15 Harris

_10/15 Structuralism  10/22 Levi-Strauss

_10/22 Symbolic/Interpretive  10/29 Turner or Geertz

_10/29 Gender 11/5 Slocum or Ortner

_11/5 Postmodernism 11/12 Rosaldo, or Appadurai