Educ 5413 - Teaching with Technology Summer 2005 (Morris) : Dr. Helen Mongan-Rallis

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row of pencils. Source: http://arthur.k12.il.us/arthurgs/aeslngr.htm

Resources on Assessing Quality of Web Sites

The following is a list of resources developed by the students in Educ 5413 (Morris) as part of our class, summer 2005

  1. Stanford Guidelines for Web Credibility (Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab, Stanford University, 2004). Designed to help web designers boost the credibility of their sites. Provides ten guidelines for building the credibility of a web site. According to the site, the guidelines are based on three years of research that included over 4,500 people.
  2. Web Guide: Assessing the quality of websites (The Open University, undated. Accessed July 22, 2005). Poses three questions to ask when looking at a website to guide users in working out whether they want to rely on the information it contains. They act as a quick checklist to help you decide how reliable you feel the information is. • Who put the site there (who owns the site)? • Why did they create the site? • When was the site last updated? Also includes links to other skills in using the Internet, such as browser basics, customizing browser, and searching the Internet.
  3. The Virtual Chase: Evaluating the Quality of Information on the Internet. (Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, LLP, last revised 2005). Designed to teach legal professionals how to do Internet research. According to the description on this site, "Researchers should evaluate the quality of information appearing online or in print based on five criteria--scope of coverage, authority, objectivity, accuracy and timeliness. This guide defines the criteria, documents incidents of questionable, false or fraudulent information as reported in the news or trade literature, provides examples of Web sites that illustrate good or bad information, and suggests strategies that help you detect bad information."
  4. Evaluation Rubrics for Websites: (Loogootee Community Schools. Last updated 1998). 3 levels: Primary, Intermediate and Secondary grades. Also has links to information about copyright and fair use; steps for creating web pages, rubrics to assessing web pages, how to announce your webpages, and projects that involve web activities.
  5. WWW CyberGuides to Web Evaluation (Linda Joseph, last updated 2002). Provides pdf rubrics for rating content and for site design. Also includes a Website investigator rubric (pdf) that guides younger children in deciding Why visit? Why stay? Why Return?
  6. How does your site measure up? (Syracuse Center for Digital Literacy, 2003). Provides links to various instruments for assessing sites. Examples: Two instruments, WebMAC Professional and the Content Validity Scale, are intended for use by educators to evaluate the sites they use in their teaching or for student learning.
  7. QUICK: Quality Information Checklist (Web site produced by Health Development Agency and Center for Health Information Quality, designed by Showme Multimedia Ltd, Last updated 15th May 2000). Provides checklist of questions to guide users in assessing website quality. Each step is linked to details (with fun graphics) that guide users in answering the questions.
  8. Kathy Schrock's Guide For Educators (Discovery School, last updated 2003). Links to a series of evaluation surveys, one each at the elementary, middle, and secondary school levels. Also provides links to a variety of articles about website evaluation and lesson plans on how to teach students evaluation skills.
  9. Evaluating a Website (2Learn.ca Education Society, 2005). Provides key indicators that will help determine the authenticity, quality, and usefulness of any website. Also provides links to other sites on evaluating websites.
  10. Outreach Assessing Websites (S. MacDonald for Metropolitan Toronto Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children, Toronto, 2001). Designed to provide survivors of violence or those doing research on anti-violence issues with some criteria to determine the legitimacy of the information found on the Internet. However, the criteria would be useful to evaluation of any kind of website by other users, too. Also provides links to a number of websites on evaluating Internet resources. Very clearly described and easy to follow.
  11. Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask (UC Berkeley - Teaching Library Internet Workshops, UC Berkley, 2005).
  12. Evaluating Software and WWW (The Education Project Asia, Shambles.net, undated, visited July 22, 2005). Provides links to a variety of resources for evaluating websites.
  13. The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources: Evaluation Criteria (Susan Beck, New Mexico State University Library, 2005). Provides framework for evaluating web sources following the criteria of accuracy, authority, objectivity, currency and coverage.
  14. Web credibility: The basics (webcredible, UK. 2005)
  15. Judging Quality on the Web (Patti S. Caravello, UCLA Charles E. Young Research Library, 2001).
  16. Evaluating Websites (Department of Education and Training, Government of Western Australia, undated. Accessed July 22, 2005).
  17. Ten C's For Evaluating Internet Sources (McIntyre Library, UW, Eau Claire, 2003).
  18. Evaluating Internet Research Sources (Robert Harris, w w w . v i r t u a l s a l t . c o m 1997).
  19. Thinking Critically about World Wide Web Resources (Esther Grassian, UCLA College Library, 1995)
  20. Assessing websites (Media Workshop New York, for Partnership of Parks, NY, undated. Accessed July 22, 2005)
  21. Watchfire: WebXact (Watchfire, 2004). Enables you to test single pages of web content for quality, accessibility, and privacy issues by entering in the URL of the page.

row of pencils. Source: http://arthur.k12.il.us/arthurgs/aeslngr.htm

Syllabus|Schedule|Assignments|WebX