Understanding Global Cultures
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Understanding Global Cultures

  Fall Semester 2015

List of countries of the world -- Wikipedia

language dictionaries and resources

International Development Indicators -- Human Development Reports, United Nations Development Programme


Friday, 21-Nov-2014 04:47:46 GMT
Today in History
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topics and resources

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End of Semester Exam

Blue book for exams.

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General Information

  • The Final Exam will be

  • Saturday 16 December 2006
    Week 16
       
        02:00-03:55
    Cina 214
       

  • The Final will be an open-book essay exam

    • Essay exams usually provide a better learning experience and, in addition, afford practice in writing

    • This is an open-book exam. You may bring and use your texts, dictionary, thesaurus, a writing handbook, class handouts, notes, outlines, drafts, memos, a laptop, and a Ouija board. You may also use references and materials from your other classes and the web, with the caveat, of course, that you properly cite any sources you use.

    • You may bring and use your laptop

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    Final Exam

  • The exam will cover materials up to and including the end of Week 15

  • Some of the questions will be cumulative, but most will focus on the materials covered since the second midsemester exam.

  • This includes the lecture materials, in-class videos, E-mails, the GCforum, the basic introductory materials of the texts, and the text and class materials on the following new countries:

  • There will also be questions available on the final asking you to compare and contrast things in two or more countries included in the entire semester
    • these comparison/contrast questions will include countries covered earlier in the semester

  • This is an open-book exam
    • You may bring and use your texts, dictionary, thesaurus, a writing handbook, class handouts, notes, outlines, drafts, and memos

    • You may also use references and materials from your other classes, with the caveat, of course, that you properly cite any sources you use

    • You may bring and use your laptop

      • but you must upload your exam to your WebDrop folder at the end of the exam period
        <https://webdrop.d.umn.edu>

      • REM: Be sure to have your batteries charged

      • Please be prepared to upload the entire exam as one file, if you can, including the optional take-home question if you choose to do that question

      • NOTE: It does not work simply to type in the .rtf extension on an existing .wps file. You must load the original document and then resave it as a .rtf file type
  • The final exam counts 30% of the final grade

  • You will have the choice of six (6) of thirteen (13) questions
    • (13 X 20 = 260 = ?)

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Sample Exam

Anthropology: Understanding Global Cultures

End of Semester Exam

21 November 2014

Answer six (only 6) of the following thirteen (13) questions. Keep in mind that there is more than one approach you can take in answering these questions. Follow these guidelines:

  • Organize your answer before you begin

  • Where appropriate, be sure to state:
    • What or who something is
    • Where it occurred or is located
    • Why it is important
    • When it occurred
    • How it happened or how it works

  • State YOUR position or approach clearly

  • Cite specific examples or references to support your statements

  • Mention problem areas or other relevant materials which you would like to consider further in a more thorough statement. That is, when you're finished with your answer, what major questions are still left unanswered?

  • Summarize your argument or discussion

  • Where appropriate use materials from more than one region of the world

  • Remember that your responses should have a beginning, a middle, and an end

  • Do not discuss any topic or country at length in more than one question

  • For the questions indicated, do not write on any country for which you were one of the presentors

.


.

  1. One of the paired tasks for the last part of the semester assigned Ch. XX from Distant Mirrors, " . . . ," with Ch. YY from Understanding Global Cultures on ". . . ." Compare and contrast the article from Ch. XX of Distant Mirrors with Ch. YY in Understanding Global Cultures. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country disussed in Ch. YY of Understanding Global Cultures].

    [There may be more than one question like question 1 on the exam.]

  2. Compare and contrast Ch. ZZ from Understanding Global Cultures on " . . . " with the class presentation on [that country]. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country in question].

  3. In "Understanding Cultural Metaphors," Martin J. Gannon talks about "X" and describes [a country] as "X." Discuss Gannon's use of the term "X" and analyze the application of that concept to [the country indicated]. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country in question].

  4. Discuss X of a people [or a country]. As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are like and unlike the [people of the country] with regard to X. Do not select a country if you were one of the presentors of [the country].

  5. Assume that you just signed up for a UMD year-long Study Abroad Program and selected the option to live with a family. You will be staying in with. . . . Discuss how what you learned from Ch. X of Understanding Global Cultures, " . . . ," might help you in your adjustment to the family you are staying with. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country].

  6. Ch. X of Understanding Global Cultures discusses "Y." This chapter talks about [a feature of the text] which. . . . Why? Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country].

  7. Relate the study of X in this class (Understanding Global Cultures, Ch. 17) to what you have been studying in History 1208 Europe in the Modern Age. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on X.

  8. Distant Mirrors' subtitle is "America as a foreign Culture." Distant Mirrors presents many articles viewing America from outsiders' points of view. . . . compare and contrast at least five Distant Mirrors' authors' treatment of [the X aspect] of American culture.

  9. Write an analytic essay on the X of America/Americans as expressed by the authors in Distant Mirrors.

  10. Discuss the pros and cons of the use of X in understanding global cultures. Be sure to give specific examples to back up your statements.

  11. Discuss what you have learned about the importance of X from looking at X cross culturally in the chapters from both Understanding Global Cultures and Distant Mirrors and from the presentations in class. Be sure to give specific examples to back up your statements.

  12. [An opinion question, asking you to appraise and evaluate one or more essays, might be included; an example of such a question would read something like the sample question on the midterm exam.]

  13. It has been said that X can be understood in terms of Y. Discuss X and indicate what you think the relevance of this might be to modern-day Global studies. Do not select any country for which you were one of the presentors.

  14. Martin J. Gannon uses the word / term "X." Discuss the concept of "X" as Gannon uses it in Understanding Global Cultures. Be sure to include examples in your discussion.

  15. In the newspaper this week there was an article on X. The following quote summarizes the authors' position:

    [quote will be inserted here].

    How would you interpret X from the point of view of what you learned in your Understanding Global Cultures class this semester?

optional take-home question

NOTE: Essentially you may make up ONE question total. You may either do that as a take-home and bring it to class with you, or you may do that in class the day of the exam. If you elect to do the optional take-home exam and bring it with you to class, then you must choose three (3) additional [5 additional on the final] of the remaining questions presented on the actual exam, as they are presented on the exam.

If you have submitted an Extra Credit report or paper, your optional question must be on a topic other than that of your Extra Credit project(s).

If you do not like these questions, make up and answer a question of your own choice relating to a topic having to do with understanding global cultures which you have not considered in your other answers. Do not select a topic that was part of any of your or your groups' in-class presentations. (If you think these questions are fantastic but simply prefer to make up one of your own, go ahead.)

Answers should contain specific information supporting your position. Both your question and your answer will be evaluated.

If you elect to make up and answer a question, you may prepare your question and answer in advance and bring them with you to the exam. If you prepare your question and answer in advance you only need to answer five (5) other question in class.

Do not write on any country for which you were one of the presenters.

 

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Sample Exam Questions Exam III

 
Anthropology: Understanding Global Cultures

End of the Semester Exam

21 November 2014

 

 

Answer SIX (only 6) of the following thirteen (13) questions. Keep in mind that there is more than one approach you can take in answering these questions. Follow these guidelines:  

Organize your answer before you begin  

Where appropriate, be sure to state:  
 
  • What or who something is
  • Where it occurred or is located
  • Why it is important
  • When it occurred
  • How it happened or how it works
 

State YOUR position or approach clearly  

Cite specific examples or references to support your statements  

Mention problem areas or other relevant materials which you would like to consider further in a more thorough statement. That is, when you're finished with your answer, what major questions are still left unanswered?  

Summarize your argument or discussion  

Where appropriate use materials from more than one region of the world  

Remember that your responses should have a beginning, a middle, and an end  

Do not discuss any topic or country at length in more than one question  

For the questions so indicated, do not write on any country for which you were one of the presenters  
     
 

NOTE: On the final exam there will be thirteen (13) questions, including the optional take-home exam question. That is to say, on the exam itself there will be a total of 13 questions, and the optional question is one of the thirteen. If you choose to do the optional question, then you will need to choose five of the remaining questions that are on the exam itself. More than thirteen questions are included below for illustration purposes.

 
1.
Current Affairs:

In the newspaper this week there was an article on X. The following quote summarizes the authors' position:

[quote will be inserted here].

How would you interpret X from the point of view of what you learned in your Understanding Global Cultures class so far this semester?

This kind of a question will look something like...

One of the BBC South Asia News headlines for Sunday, 15 October 2006, read Japan's old, young enough to work: In Japan, an increasing number of older people are deciding that they do not want to leave their jobs at retirement age ” (full story attached). From what you read in Chapter 3 of Understanding Global Cultures , “The Japanese Garden,” and from what you learned about Japan from the presentation in class, how would you explain this apparent reluctance of Japanese seniors to leave their jobs?

Or like this...

Yesterday, Wednesday, 30 November 2005, 17:46 GMT , BBC News reported a leading news item from France: “Woman has first face transplant: Surgeons in France have carried out the first face transplant, it has been reported.” From what you know from your readings on France, and from the class presentation on France, what do you suppose this was all about < http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4484728.stm >?

Or like this...

In the last few days a major story in Minnesota dealt with the discovery of polio among the Amish in Clarissa, MN (three of these news reports were e-mailed to you):

More polio cases likely for Amish, health officials say
BY MARTIGA LOHN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. PAUL -- More polio cases will probably turn up in a conservative, closed Amish community in central Minnesota, state health officials said Thursday.
Friday, October 14, 2005 (DuluthSuperior.com)

Amish urged to immunize
BY PATRICK CONDON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLARISSA, Minn. -- The residents of a small Amish community where government doctors have diagnosed four cases of the polio virus seem bewildered by an unwelcome rush of attention from the outside world.
Monday, October 17, 2005 (DuluthSuperior.com)

This week a major story coming out of Central Europe and other parts of the world is the discovery and spread of avian flu [“the dreaded H5N1 virus”], and many European governments and the European Union (EU) are taking strong action to prevent the spread of “bird flu”:

Europe on bird flu alert
European nations step up efforts to protect against bird flu, as a strain risky to humans is found in Turkey and Romania. 15/10/2005

Bird flu - the global impact

The BBC News website charts the number of deaths around the world from avian flu H5N1.

15/10/2005

Bird flu pandemic 'will hit UK'

A bird flu pandemic will hit Britain, killing about 50,000 - but not necessarily this year, says the chief medical officer.

16/10/2005

“Bird Flu” has become a major problem in two of the countries we have studied so far, Turkey, and Poland, and it is predicted that it will become a problem for all of Europe and maybe even all of the World.

From what you know so far about understanding global cultures, argue for or against the proposition that the government should intervene in a culture to prevent the spread of a contagious serious disease (such as polio or the “bird flu”). [“Government” here can include entities like the State of Minnesota, the European Union (EU), the nation . . .]

Or this kind of a question may look something like the following example, and the item(s) from the news will be attached to the exam, or handed out separately at the beginning of the exam.

In this example the news items were in the Duluth News-Tribune the morning of the exam, Thursday, 30 November, 2006. Often the items are taken from the news on the weekend before the exam...

Current Affairs:

As you sit there taking this exam two of the most visible and influential leaders in the world, separately, are essentially in the Middle East on diplomatic missions – President George W. Bush, who was supposed to meet yesterday with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, and His Pope Benedict XVI.

Both items made today's Duluth News-Tribune :

Canceled meeting underscores Iraq's volatility (p. A3)

IRAQ: The White House says talks with Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki will continue despite turmoil in Baghdad.

Thursday, November, 30, 2006

A full copy of this article from today's Duluth News-Tribun e is attached .

Pope's comments may set tone for trip (p. A3)

Benedict XVI is trying to strengthen connections with Orthodox Christian leaders while anger among Muslims still simmers.

Thursday, November, 30, 2006

An on-line version of Brian Murphy's article is attached .

Questions:

(a) Compare and contrast the importance of President Bush and Pope Benedict XV as world leaders

(b) Compare and contrast specifically their current diplomatic missions this week

Include in your discussion your prediction of what the likely outcome of each of these diplomatic missions will be.

(c) Briefly, do you think someone screwed up the scheduling by having both of these world leaders there at the same time, or , do think it was planned on purpose that they be there at the same time? Why?

 
2.
There will likely be four or five questions taken from the GCforum, with the actual questions on the exam taken from the current entries on the GCforum. These examples are from past semesters:

In Understanding Global Cultures , Gannon talks about the different types of cultures. For this section, we learned about nations from three of these types, “Equality Matching Cultures,” “Market Pricing Cultures,” and “Cleft National Cultures.” How do these different cultural types shape the nation's culture itself and what makes an "Equality matching culture" different from a "Market pricing culture," or a "Market pricing culture" different from a "Cleft national culture"?

 
 
From the GC forum, with the actual questions on the exam taken from the current entries on the GCforum. These examples are from past semesters:

In our textbook Distant Mirrors there are two chapters that have to do with xxx, Ch. xxx "xxx" by xxx [xxx], and Ch. xxx "xxx" by xxx [xxx] . In what ways similar and different do these two xxx see xxx?

 
 
From the GC forum, with the actual questions on the exam taken from the current entries on the GCforum. These examples are from past semesters:

Using information from the video on xxx and the xxxl chapter in the textbook, Understanding Global Cultures , “xxx,” discuss the xxx in xxx today.

 
 
From the GC forum, with the actual questions on the exam taken from the current entries on the GCforum. These examples are from past semesters:

Choose one of the chapters in the Understanding Global Cultures textbook that we have covered since Exam II (a list of the countries is on p. 1 of this exam) and xxx. Explain why xxx.

 
3.
Some assignments appear in pairs; for e.g., "Read Read UGC Ch. 2 and DM Ch. 9." This assigns Ch. 9 from Distant Mirrors: America as a Foreign Culture which was written by an author from Thailand with Ch. 2 from Understanding Global Cultures on "The Thai Kingdom."

You will be given a pair, or asked to pick a pair, that is, a pair where an author in Distant Mirrors is from a country featured in Understanding Global Cultures. Compare and contrast the article from Distant Mirrors with the chapter in Understanding Global Cultures.

This kind of a question will look something like...

The assignments for Thailand, Japan, Poland and Korea appear in pairs; for e.g., one assignment says you should "Read Read UGC Ch. 8 and DM Ch. 5." This assigns Ch. 5 from Distant Mirrors: America as a Foreign Culture , which was written by an author from Poland, with Ch. 8 from Understanding Global Cultures on "The Polish Village Church."

Compare and contrast the article by the Polish author (Janusz L. Mucha) from Distant Mirrors with the chapter in Understanding Global Cultures on Poland.

 
4.

Compare and contrast a chapter from Understanding Global Cultures with the class presentation on the country. Do not select a country for which you were one of the presenters.

This kind of a question will look something like...

Compare and contrast the chapter from Understanding Global Cultures on “Bedouin Jewelry and Saudi Arabia” with the class presentation on Saudi Arabia.

Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on Saudi Arabia.

 
4.
In Chapter 1 of Understanding Global Cultures, "Understanding Cultural Metaphors," Martin J. Gannon talks about X. Pick two cultures other than the ones you presented on in class and describe how X pertains to them.  
5.
In Understanding Global Cultures Martin J. Gannon talks a lot about what he calls "xxx" and "xxx."

For the first part of the semester we have discussed "xxx." Pick two "xxx" and compare and contrast them in terms of Gannon's discussion.
 
6.
Comparison-Contrast, XY and You:

Discuss X of the Y people (or culture) as discussed in Understanding Global Cultures. As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are (a) like, and, (b) unlike the Y people with regard to X. Do not select a country for which you were one of the presenter.

This kind of a question will look something like...

Comparison-Contrast, Malaysians and You:

xxxDiscuss the Malaysian practice of Balik Kampung . As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are (a) like, and, (b) unlike the Malaysian people with regard to what you will be doing in the three weeks after you finish with the final exam.

Comparison-Contrast, Turkish Coffeehouses and You:

xxxDiscuss the coffeehouse of the Turkish people as discussed in Understanding Global Cultures . As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are (a) like, and, (b) unlike the Turkish people with regard to where you go to drink recreational beverages.

Comparison-Contrast, Irish, their Conversation, and You:

xxxDiscuss the "conversation metaphor" of the Irish as presented in Understanding Global Cultures. As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are

a. like, and,

b. unlike the Irish with regard to conversation.

Comparison-Contrast, The British, their Traditional House, and You:

xxxDiscuss "The Traditional British House" of the British people. As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are (a) like, and, (b) unlike the British with regard to the type of house you live in B and how you live in it.

 
7.
It has been said that X can be understood in terms of Y. Discuss X and Y and indicate what you think the relevance of these might be to modern-day Global studies. Do not select any country for which you were one of the presenter.

This kind of a question will look something like...

xxxIt has been said that Israel can best be understood in terms of its thousand-year search for a homeland. Discuss the role the Kibbutzim as it is "intertwined with [Israel's] history and values" in the development of the modern Jewish state.

xxxDo not select this question if you were a presenter on Israel.

Or it might look something like...

It has been said that contemporary nations must be understood in terms of their past homeland experiences with foreign peoples / nations.

a. Discuss the role of invasion / conquest / occupation by foreigners, and, if appropriate, subsequent colonialization / colonialism in the history of one of the nations considered so far in class.

Discuss the relevance of historical considerations of colonizalization in modern-day global studies.

Do not select any country for which you were one of the presenters.

 
8.
Martin J. Gannon uses the word / term "X." Discuss the concept of "X" as Gannon uses it in Understanding Global Cultures. Be sure to include examples in your discussion.

This kind of a question will look something like...

Gannon, in Understanding Global Cultures, discusses "xxx" (Ch. xxx) and the "xxx" (Ch. xxx) Compare and contrast the exclusivity of these two xxx.

 
9.
In class, during the first part of the semester, we spent a lot of time discussing X. Why did we spend so much time on that? Do not select any country for which you were one of the presenter.

This kind of a question mght take several forms, one of which would be something like...

xxxThailand is 95% Buddhist, India is 81% Hindu, Saudi Arabia is almost 100% Muslim, Turkey is 99.8% Muslim, Brazil is 80% "nominal" Roman Catholic, and Poland is 95% Roman Catholic.

xxxJapan is 50% Buddhist, and Korea is 49% Christian, 47% Buddhist, and 3%, Confucianist (Confucius was the 5th-6th century Chinese philosopher and teacher now known for his little sayings of wisdom; "Confucius says. . . . ").

Ixxxn other words, all countries studied so far are strongly dominated by a single religion, except for Japan and South Korea (where only half of the country belong to one religion).

xxxDiscuss how the presence of a dominant religion affects the social structure of countries.

Or it might look like this...

xxxOne of the main global stories so far this semester has been the formal discussions about whether or not Turkey should be admitted to the European Union (EU) have begun. This is an issue which has divided EU Europe for years.

xxx(A) From your point of view, what are the pros and cons of Turkey joining the EU?

xxx(B) Why do you think the question of Turkey joining the EU is " an increasingly divisive issue” in the European EU countries?

Or it might look like this...

In class, during the first two-thirds of the semester, we spent a lot of time discussing xxx (xxx, etc.). (A) Why did we spend so much time on that? (B) Discuss what alternative class presentation approach(es) might be preferable.

 
10.
DeVita's book is called Distant Mirrors: America as a Foreign Culture. Assume you were a native of one of the countries on which you made a class presentation. From that perspective, what xxx?  
11.
DeVita and Armstrong, in Distant Mirrors, present Francoise Dussart’s essay, “X of Y.” Discuss what you think Dussart’s “X” of Y.

This kind of a question will look something like...

DeVita and Armstrong, in Distant Mirrors , present xxx's essay, "xxx." Discuss what you think xxx's "first impressions" of xxx might be.

 
12.

Relate the study of any one nation so far considered in your Understanding Global Cultures class with xxx. Do not select a country for which you were one of the presenter.

 

 
13.

optional take-home question

NOTE: Essentially you may make up ONE question total. You may either do that as a take-home and bring it to class with you, or you may do that in class the day of the exam. If you elect to do the optional take-home exam and bring it with you to class, then you must choose three (3) additional of the remaining questions presented on the actual exam, as they are presented on the exam.

If you do not like these questions, make up and answer a question of your own choice relating to a topic having to do with understanding global cultures which you have not considered in your other answers. Do not select a topic that was part of any of your or your groups' in-class presentations. (If you think these questions are fantastic but simply prefer to make up one of your own, go ahead.)

Answers should contain specific information supporting your position. Both your question and your answer will be evaluated.

If you elect to make up and answer a question, you may prepare your question and answer in advance and bring them with you to the exam. If you prepare your question and answer in advance you only need to answer three (3) other question in class.

Do not write on any country for which you were one of the presenters.

 
     
  OTHER EXAMPLES  
 

A Qustion About a Specific Country:

This kind of a question will look something like...

Ireland:

In Ch. 12 of Understanding Global Cultures , "Irish Conversations," Gannon discusses "Prayer as Conversation," and, in fact, claims that “prayer or a conversation with God is one of the most important parts of an Irish life.” From what you know, based on your readings and listenings and viewings in this class, what do you suppose God has to say about Ireland and the Irish?

For purposes of this question, should you choose to answer it, and should you personally not believe in God, you must practice what is commonly known as “a willing suspension of disbelief.” Wikipedia has this to say about “suspension of disbelief”:

The term 'Suspension of disbelief' was originally coined by the romanticist Samuel Taylor Coleridge in his Biographia Literaria (1817):

" (...) it was agreed, that my endeavours should be directed to persons and characters supernatural , or at least romantic, yet so as to transfer from our inward nature a human interest and a semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. "

It is not uncommon to cite the full phrase "willing suspension of disbelief", but the arguably redundant "willing" is more often omitted, at least on the Web.

 
 

A Question Pertaining to Methods:

This kind of a question will look something like...

Methods:

Anthropologists often use scaling as an analytical tool in studying Global Cultures. Discuss the various kinds of scaling techniques, using two or more specific examples to explain each type.

Methods:

In the first week of class it was mentioned that demography (the study population and population structures) is important to understanding global cultures. As was also mentioned during the first week of class, many European countries are having problems, or expect to have problems, relating to their low birth rates. In October 2004, Minnesota Public Radio carried a brief story about demographic problems in Poland , viz., that the Polish people were not having enough children to maintain their society. According to the MPR story, Poland is offering a cash bonus to couples if they have children, and a free room . . . for a wedding reception . . . for young people wanting to get married. 

The [CIA] World Factbook website lists Poland ' s total fertility rate at "1.38 children born / woman (2004 est.)" and a population growth rate at "0.02% (2004 est.)." As was mentioned during the first week of class, a country needs a fertility rate of about 2.2 in order to maintain itself economically (because some older adults are no longer in the work force and these adults also tend to be living longer. . . ). The [CIA] World Factbook website also indicates that Poland is "Roman Catholic 95% (about 75% practicing)." Also, 99.8% of people age fifteen and over can read and write.

From what you have learned so far in class, how would you interpret all of this information?

 
 

Comparison-Contrast of Two Specified Countries:

This kind of a question will look something like...

Comparison-Contrast, Nigeria / Israel:

Ch. 19 of Understanding Global Cultures discussed "The Nigerian Marketplace" ; Ch. 20 discussed "The Israeli Kibbutzim and Moshavim."

Compare and contrast major contemporary world events in terms of what you have learned from these videos, these chapters, and the class presentations on these countries.

 
 

Comparison-Contrast of Two Specified Countries:

This kind of a question will look something like...

Comparison-Contrast, Germany / Italy:

In this segment of the course Gannon, in Understanding Global Cultures , used two musical metaphors: "The German Symphony" (Ch. 10) and "The Italian Opera" (Ch. 21).   Compare and contrast Germany and Italy in terms of their musical metaphors.

 

 

 

 

This course is governed by the . . .

UMD Student Academic Integrity Policy

Office of Student Behavior > UMD Student Academic Integrity Office

<www.d.umn.edu/assl/conduct/integrity>

"Academic dishonesty tarnishes UMD's reputation and discredits the accomplishments of students. UMD is committed to providing students every possible opportunity to grow in mind and spirit. This pledge can only be redeemed in an environment of trust, honesty, and fairness. As a result, academic dishonesty is regarded as a serious offense by all members of the academic community. In keeping with this ideal, this course will adhere to UMD's Student Academic Integrity Policy, which can be found at www.d.umn.edu/assl/conduct/integrity. This policy sanctions students engaging in academic dishonesty with penalties up to and including expulsion from the university for repeat offenders." -- UMD Educational Policy Committee, Jill Jensen, Chair (08/16/2007)

and the

UMD Conduct Code:

<http://www.d.umn.edu/catalogs/current/umd/gen/conduct.html>

<http://www.d.umn.edu/assl/conduct/code/>

"The instructor will enforce and students are expected to follow the University's Student Conduct Code (http://www.d.umn.edu/assl/conduct/code). Appropriate classroom conduct promotes an environment of academic achievement and integrity. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor's ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. Disruptive behavior includes inappropriate use of technology in the classroom. Examples include ringing cell phones, text-messaging, watching videos, playing computer games, doing email, or surfing the Internet on your computer instead of note-taking or other instructor-sanctioned activities." -- UMD Educational Policy Committee, Jill Jensen, Chair (08/16/2007)



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