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Thursday, 17 April 2014, 14:25 (02:25 PM) CDT, day 107 of 2014

Prehistoric Cultures

Fall 2012 Calendar -- DAY [archive]

Fall 2012 Calendar -- EVENING [archive]

Dates and Times to Remember

class slides on-line
(free PowerPoint Viewer 2010)

Thursday, 17 April 2014, 19:25 (07:25 PM) GMT, day 107 of 2014
. . . in History
  . . . in Headlines

      Babel Fish Translation
~ translate this page

Cutting Costs for College Textbooks

general textbook information
OWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.

 

Clovis point

Clovis point
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Lithics

and tool use / tool manufacture

"Chart of the Principal Paleolithic Industries"

see also
Magdalenian
Solutrean
Grevettian
Aurignacian
Châtelperronian

lithic analysis -- Wikipedia

Try "The lithics site"
-- Hugh Jarvis, SUNY Buffalo (Comprehensive)


. . .The first published illustration of a hand ax. . . . (Hearne's [1715] edition of Leland's Collectanea 1:1xiv). This implement is described in the Sloane Catalogue: 'No. 246. A British weapon [sic.] found, with elephant's tooth, opposite to Black Mary's, near Grayes Inn Lane' (as quoted in J. Evans 1897: 581.) (right) The same hand ax reproduced [but not included here] as a woodcut in J. Evans, Ancient Stone Implements 1897: Fig. 451. . . ." (Frank Hole and Robert F. Heizer, An Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology, 3rd ed., New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1973, p. 59.)

Hand Ax, 1715

". . .The first published illustration of a hand ax. . . . (Hearne's [1715] edition of Leland's Collectanea 1:1xiv). This implement is described in the Sloane Catalogue: 'No. 246. A British weapon [sic.] found, with elephant's tooth, opposite to Black Mary's, near Grayes Inn Lane' (as quoted in J. Evans 1897: 581.) (right) The same hand ax reproduced [but not included here] as a woodcut in J. Evans, Ancient Stone Implements 1897: Fig. 451. . . ." (Frank Hole and Robert F. Heizer, An Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology, 3rd ed., New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1973, p. 59.
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In the news . . .

Evolution of Human 'Super-Brain' Tied to Development of Bipedalism, Tool-Making -- EurekAlert (20 April 2011)

Oldest tool-use claim challenged -- BBC News (16 November 2010)

Archaeologist Recreates Stone Age Technology -- LiveScience (12 November 2010)

World's Oldest Ax Discovered -- DiscoveryNews (05 November 2010)

Language and Toolmaking Evolved Together, Say Researchers -- Guardian (03 November 2010)

Humans Crafted Complex Tools Earlier Than Thought -- Discover (28 October 2010)

Stone Tools 'Change Migration Story' -- BBC News (19 September 2010)

Oldest Evidence of Arrows Found -- BBC News (26 August 2010)

Hail Lucy! - The New Queen of the Stone Age -- Telegraph (11 August 2010)

Lucy the Butcher? Tool Use Pushed Back 800,000 Years -- National Geographic News (11 August 2010)

Tool-Making and Meat-Eating Began 3.5 Million Years Ago -- BBC News (11 August 2010)
Oldest tool-use claim challenged -- BBC News (16 November 2010)

Tool Manipulation Is Represented Similarly in the Brains of the Blind and the Sighted -- EurekAlert (23 June 2010)

Top 100 Stories of 2009 #58: Orangutans Use Tool to Lower the Sound of Their Voices -- Discover (29 December 2009)

Human Evolution: The Origin of Tool Use -- LiveScience (11 November 2009)

Tool-making Human Ancestors Inhabited Grassland Environments Two Million Years Ago -- ScienceDaily (21 October 2009)

Earliest Evidence of Humans Thriving on the Savannah -- New Scientist (21 October 2009)

Evidence for Stone Age Multitasking -- LiveScience (28 September 2009)

Giant Stone-Age Axes Found In African Lake Basin -- ScienceDaily (14 September 2009)

Four giant stone hand axes were recovered from the the dry basin of Lake Makgadikgadi in the Kalahari Desert.

Four giant stone hand axes were recovered from the the dry basin of Lake Makgadikgadi in the Kalahari Desert.
(Credit: University of Oxford).

Early Europeans Used Sophisticated Tools -- Science (02 September 2009)

Royal Arms of Scotland.

900,000-year-old hand ax, Estrecho del Quípar, southern Spain.
Credit: Michael Walker

Early Human Lessons: Hot Rocks Make Sharper Tools -- NPR (14 August 2009)

Stone-Age Innovation Explains Ancient Population Boom -- New Scientist (21 July 2009)

Oldest Stone Blades Uncovered -- Science (02 April 2009)

Royal Arms of Scotland.

Cutting-edge technology.
A stone core (lower left) and three of the recently found blades.

Credit: Cara Roure Johnson and Sally McBrearty/University of Connecticut

"Paleoanthropologists Cara Roure Johnson and Sally McBrearty of the University of Connecticut, Storrs, recently discovered the blades at five sites in the region, including two that date to between 509,000 and 543,000 years ago. 'This is the oldest known occurrence of blades,' Johnson reported. . . ."

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