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Cultural Anthropology
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Tim Roufs

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Texts and Other Class Material

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Welcome to Cultural Anthropology

Supported by
Moodle
<https://moodle2.umn.edu/>

In addition to the Moodle site the Course Calendar for Summer 2012 is on-line at
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/cacal-ss2012.html#title>

This will be a great course, and a great experience. You will see. . .

I am looking forward to meeting you in class on the 6th. In the meantime, you might want to have a look at the information in your Moodle folder at <https://moodle.umn.edu/>, or the companion on-line Cultural Anthropology syllabus, which you can find on the web at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/cacal-ss2012.html#title>.

Right off the bat you might also be interested in the textbook for the course. Complete information on the textbook can be found at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/catext.html#title>. In brief . . .

 

Text: Cultural Anthro, 1st Edition, by Robbins (Wadsworth, 2012)

Cultural Anthro

 

  • by Richard H. Robbins

  • Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 2012
  • ISBN-10: 9781111300890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1111300890
  • 320 pages Paper Bound

information on the textbook for the course
general textbook information
exam information
study questions
video schedule



Cultural Anthro (2012) is currently available online from about $48.54 new / $18.50 used (+ p/h, at amazon.com & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25). Other on-line and brick and mortar stores should have comparable offers. The Amazon Textbook Buyback Store will also buy it back (the current Amazon Buyback price is $10.64. Which means the Amazon Price After Buyback would be $7.86--a real bargain, even with p/h added). Other on-line and brick and mortar stores should have comparable offers.

UMD Bookstore | Amazon.com | Barnes and Noble
CampusBooks.com | Chegg [rental] | ecampus.com | half.com
booksprice.com | CheapestTextbooks.com | CourseSmart.com | TextbookMedia.com

| Direct Textbook |
|

20 April 2012

See further information on the text webpage at
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/catext.html#title>

More general textbook information can be found at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/tr/trtextbooks.html#title>.

My office hours (and regular schedule information) can be found at
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1602/pcoffice.html#title>.

Exams will be essays constructed from the list of questions posed as the chapter titles and chapter subheadings of the text, which are most easily reviewed in the “Table of Contents” section of the text.

One of the four main characteristics of American Anthropology is fieldwork, a primary research technique, involving “participant observation," which usually means living among the people one is interested in learning from and about.

It would be wonderful if for anthropology classes we could just rent a bus or charter a plane and drive or fly off for a year or more to learn first-hand from the people themselves. Money, time, and practicality prohibit that, so the next best thing—when it comes to studying anthropology—is going to places and viewing subjects by film. And we will do a lot of that in this class, as is typical of anthropology classes. More information on Visual Anthropology is available on-line at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/visual_anthropology.html#title>.

Laptops are welcome in the classroom. Many find a laptop quite useful in following the lectures as lectures are web supported. If you are new to the world of "technology" don't worry too much about that, or using the materials in your Moodle folder. Things may not "work" for you at first, but hang in there and we'll help you along.

With all of these materials you will be expected to share your ideas and comments with others in the Class Forum and Wikis. I'm looking forward to that.

You will find that there are "an awful lot" of materials on-line—maybe even too many!

But don't worry. You will find the required materials center stage in yourMoodle folder. Most of the rest of the materials are optional.

Where to start?

Probably the best place is by having a quick look at the "First Day Handout" on-line at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/cahandout_first-day.html#title>.

Then have a look at yourMoodle Gradebook folder, which gives a nice listing of the actual requirements and due dates for the course. (You'll find the link for that in the upper-left-hand corner of the top of page one of your Moodle folder <https://moodle.umn.edu/>.)

Then have a look at the "Course Overview" in Block 1 (the top of page one) of yourMoodle folder <https://moodle.umn.edu/>.

So once again, welcome to Anth 1604 Cultural Anthropology. This will be a great course, and a great experience. You will see. . . .

If you have any questions right now, please do not hesitate to post them on theMoodle "Messenger" or e-mail troufs@d.umn.edu, or stop in before class at Cina 215.

Best Wishes,

Tim Roufs

Duluth, MN
23 April 2012

 

Cultural Anthro (2012) is currently available online from about $48.54 new / $18.50 used (+ p/h, at amazon.com & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25). Other on-line and brick and mortar stores should have comparable offers. The Amazon Textbook Buyback Store will also buy it back (the current Amazon Buyback price is $10.64. Which means the Amazon Price After Buyback would be $7.86--a real bargain, even with p/h added). Other on-line and brick and mortar stores should have comparable offers.

UMD Bookstore | Amazon.com | Barnes and Noble
CampusBooks.com | Chegg [rental] | ecampus.com | half.com
booksprice.com | CheapestTextbooks.com | CourseSmart.com | TextbookMedia.com

| Direct Textbook |
|

20 April 2012

Cultural Anthro

  • by Richard H. Robbins

  • Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing, 2012
  • ISBN-10: 9781111300890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1111300890
  • 320 pages Paper Bound

information on the textbook for the course
general textbook information
exam information
study questions
video schedule

 

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index

Designed for and by today's students in every detail, CULTURAL ANTHRO was developed from over sixty student and faculty members to provide a more engaging and accessible solution that appeals to different learning styles at a value-based price. This concise CULTURAL ANTHRO text includes all of the key concepts that your instructors require and a full suite of learning aids to accommodate your busy lifestyle including chapter-by-chapter study cards, self-quizzes, downloadable flash cards, and more. Learn how to think like an anthropologist about pressing new topics such as the economic downturn, terrorism, and the human impact on the environment using a unique question-and-answer format and chapter-ending case studies.

  • An innovative combination of content delivery both in print and online provides a core text and a wealth of comprehensive multimedia teaching and learning assets based on input from student focus groups and surveys, and from interviews with over sixty faculty and students.

  • Shorter, comprehensive chapters in a modern design present content in a more engaging and accessible format without minimizing coverage for your course.

  • Chapter In Review Cards at the back of the Student Editions provide students a portable study tool containing all of the pertinent information for class preparation.

  • Instructor Prep Cards at the back of the Instructor’s Edition make preparation simple with detachable cards for each chapter, offering a quick map of chapter content, a list of corresponding Microsoft PowerPoint® and video resources, additional examples, and suggested assignments and discussion questions to help you organize chapter content efficiently.

  • A full suite of unique learning tools that appeal to different learning styles is available to students with the purchase of a new book. This includes access to an integrated eBook, chapter-specific interactive learning tools, including flashcards, quizzes, videos and more in your Anthropology CourseMate, accessed through CengageBrain.com.

  • All of the content and resources you expect with a supplements package that is second to none.

  • Actively engage your students with the unique question and answer format designed to teach students to think critically like an anthropologist on key questions anthropologists ask and such pressing new topics as the economic downturn, terrorism, and the human impact on the environment.

  • Numerous comparisons of world cultures with American culture encourage students to recognize their own cultural perspectives.
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Table Of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

1. Culture and Meaning

  • PROBLEM 1: How can people begin to understand beliefs and behaviors that are different from their own?

    • Question 1.1
      • Why Do Human Beings Differ in Their Beliefs and Behaviors?

    • Question 1.2
      • How Do People Judge the Beliefs and Behaviors of Others?

    • Question 1.3
      • Is It Possible to See the World Through the Eyes of Others?

    • Question 1.4
      • How Can the Meanings That Others Find in Experience Be Interpreted and Described?

    • Question 1.5
      • What Can Learning About Other People Tell Americans About Themselves?

2. The Meaning of Progress and Development

    • PROBLEM 2: How do we explain the transformation of human societies over the past 10,000 years from small-scale, nomadic bands of hunters and gatherers, to large-scale, urban-industrial states?

      • Question 2.1

        • Why Did Hunter-Gather Societies Switch to Sedentary Agriculture?

      • Question 2.2
        • Why Are Some Societies More Industrially Advanced Than Others?

      • Question 2.3
        • Why Don't Poor Countries Modernize and Develop in the Same Way as Wealthy Countries?

      • Question 2.4
        • How Do Modern Standards of Health and Medical Treatment Compare with Those of Traditional Societies?

      • Question 2.5
        • Why are Simpler Societies Disappearing?

3. Globalization, Neoliberalism, and the Nation-State

  • PROBLEM 3: What is globalization, and what does ithave to do with me?

    • Question 3.1
      • How Do We Define Happiness and Well-Being?

    • Question 3.2
      • Where Does the Wealth Needed to Sustain Growth Come From?

    • Question 3.3
      • What Kind of Economic System is Necessary to Sustain Growth?

    • Question 3.4
      • What Is the Role of the Nation-State in Sustaining Growth?

    • Question 3.5
      • 2012 Why Do Economies Collapse?

      • 2009 What Are the Effects of the Need for Perpetual Growth on Society, and Is It Possible to Redefine What Is Good and Desirable?

4. The Social and Cultural Construction of Reality

  • PROBLEM 4: Why do people believe different things, and why are they so certain that their view of the world is correct, and others are wrong?

    • Question 4.1
      • How Does Language Affect the Meanings People Assign to Experience?

    • Question 4.2
      • How Does Symbolic Action Reinforce a Particular View of the World?

    • Question 4.3
      • How Do People Come to Believe What They Do, and How Do They Continue to Hold to Their Beliefs Even if They Seem Contradictory or Ambiguous?

    • Question 4.4
      • 2012 Can Humor be Used to Resolve the Contradictions inherent in Languge and Metaphor?

      • 2009 How Does the Way We Live Affect Our Beliefs and Rituals?

        • "Acting" in Love
        • Love and Class Structure
        • Love and Individualism
        • Romantic Love and the Functioning of Society

        cf., video: Strange Relations

    • Question 4.5

5. Patterns of Family Relations

  • PROBLEM 5: What do we need to know before we can understand the dynamics of family life in other societies?

    • Question 5.1
      • What Is The Composition of The Typical Family Group?
        • The Family Composition of the Ju/wasi
        • The Family Composition of the Trobriand Islanders
        • The Family Composition of the Chinese

    • Question 5.2
      • How are Families Formed, and The Ideal Family Type Maintained?
        • The Family Cycle of the Ju/wasi
        • The Family Cycle of the Trobriand Islanders
        • The Family Cycle of the Chinese

    • Question 5.3
      • What Are the Roles of Sexuality, Love, and Wealth?
        • Sex, Love,m and Wealth among the Ju/wasi
        • Sex, Love,m and Wealth among the Trobriand Islanders
        • Sex, Love,m and Wealth among the Chinese

    • Question 5.4
      • What Threatens to Disrupt the Family Unit?
        • Threats to the Ju/wasi
        • Threats to the Trobriand Islanders
        • Threats to the Chinese

6. The Cultural Construction of Identity

  • PROBLEM 6: How do people determine who they are, and how do they communicate who they think they are to others?

    • Question 6.1
      • How Does the Concept of Personhood Vary from Society to Society?

    • Question 6.2
      • How Do Societies Distinguish Individuals from One Another?

    • Question 6.3
      • How Do Individuals Learn Who They Are?

    • Question 6.4
      • How Do Individuals Communicate Their Identities to One Another?

    • Question 6.5
      • How Do Individuals Defend Their Identities When They Are Threatened?

7. The Cultural Construction of Social Hierarchy

  • PROBLEM 7: Why are modern societies characterized by social, political, and economic inequalities?

    • Question 7.1
      • How Do Societies Rank People in Social Hierarchies?

    • Question 7.2
      • Why Do Societies Construct Social Hierarchies?

    • Question 7.3
      • How Do People Come to Accept Social Hierarchies as Natural?

    • Question 7.4
      • How Do People Living in Poverty Adapt to Their Condition?

    • Question 7.5
      • Can a Nonstratified Community Exist Within a Larger Hierarchical Society?

8. The Cultural Construction of Violent Conflict

  • PROBLEM 8: How do societies give meaning to and justify collective violence?

    • Question 8.1
      • How Do Societies Create a Bias in Favor of Collective Violence?

    • Question 8.2
      • How Do Societies Create a Bias Against Violent Conflict?

    • Question 8.3
      • What Are the Economic, Political, or Social Differences Between Peaceful and Violent Societies?

    • Question 8.4
      • What Are the Effects of War on Society?

    • Question 8.5
      • How Is It Possible to Justify the Construction of Weapons of Mass Destruction?

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

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Features

  • Key research problems on 'culture and meaning,' 'the idea ofprogress,' 'globalization,' 'neoliberalism','the social and cultural construction of reality,' 'family relations,' 'identity,' 'social hierarchy,' and 'conflict' are discussed using a participatory, active-learning approach

  • Robbins includes integrated student exercises and simulations that can be used for written assignments, class discussions, or group work

  • Numerous comparisons of world cultures with American culture encourage students to recognize their own cultural perspectives

  • The Book Companion Website includes password-protected, downloadable classroom resources for instructors, as well as review questions and quizzes for students

  • Key research problems dealing with beliefs, behaviors, family relations, and social constructions include critical thinking questions and open every chapter

  • Integrated students exercises allow you to work individually or in a group to critically evaluate and discuss the pros and cons of cultural beliefs and behaviors seen in the world around you

  • Numerous comparisons of world cultures with American culture encourage you to recognize your own cultural perspectives

  • The Book Companion Website includes review questions and chapter-by-chapter quizzing

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New to the 2009 Edition

  • New chapter on Globalization, neoliberalism and the nation-state, Chapter 3, that presents material on the pros and cons of a globalized world

  • Chapter 2 includes more material on the impact of change on indigenous peoples, while Chapter 4 includes a new case study on anthropology and a career in political consulting

  • End-of-Chapter case studies in applied anthropology will be fewer and richer (including maps), for a more in-depth look at researching a problem

  • This edition is accompanied by rich online resources, such as a Companion Website with interactive exercises and quizzing. You can also purchase access to the Anthropology Resource Center, a dynamic tool for understanding core concepts in anthropology using video clips, interactive exercises, the latest news, and essays on key research being done around the world. To purchase access to the Anthropology Resource Center, visit www.ichapters.com

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Other Resources

  • Text Assignments are Listed by Day

© 1998 - 2014 Timothy G. Roufs    Envelope: E-mail
Page URL: http:// www.d.umn.edu /cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/catext.html
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