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Peoples and Cultures of Europe


 Spring 2016 Calendar

Friday, 26 August 2016, 20:10 (08:10 PM) CDT, day 239 of 2016

Society for the Anthropology of Europe

Countries, Cultures, Regions, and Territories of Europe

 topics and resources

see also Understanding Global Cultures

  Coins of the Eurozone

  Euro banknotes

  Eurozone fiscal matters

 European Studies

  language dictionaries

  BBC News: Europe EurostatEuropa (EU)

 

Saturday, 27 August 2016, 01:10 (01:10 AM) GMT, day 240 of 2016
Today in History
Today in Headlines
Word of the Day

Babel Fish Translation
~ translate this page
OWL (Online Writing Lab) Purdue University.

topics and resources

World Clock Time

Europa and the Bull, Moreay.

Europa and the Bull

Enlèvement d'Europe
  Nöel-Nicolas Coypel, c. 1726
to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index


Texts and Other Class Material

Online Reserve Materials

Cutting Costs for College Textbooks -- NPR

UMD Bookstore
Amazon.com
Barnes and Noble
booksprice.com
CampusBooks.com
CheapestTextbooks.com
Chegg.com
[rental]
CourseSmart.com
[e-Texts]
ecampus.com
half.com
TextbookMedia.com
[some free, with ads]



general textbook information


Welcome to Anthropology 3635 Peoples and Cultures of Europe
(Anthropology of Europe)

Available on-line in your
Moodle
folder at <https://moodle.umn.edu/>

I hope you are having a great holiday season.

I am sending this note out early to make it more convenient for the pre-crastinators to order textbooks on-line (if that is an attractive option for you), and / or to let you get started reading one or other of the interesting books we have for the class (if you are the kind of person who likes to read ahead). If neither of these options applies to you, and you feel like a little end-of-the-holiday season procrastination, just relax and enjoy the wonderful winter weather, and, the rest of your break (but be sure to have some lentils on New Years’ Day).

Peoples and Cultures of Europe will be a great course, and a great experience. You will see. . . .

Interest in world cultures—and especially the peoples and cultures of Europe—has never been higher. You can see that in the news and editorial pages of the weekly papers and the other news media. Lots of things are happening on the European front . . . virtually every day. One of the best sources for up-to-date news on Europe is BBC News Europe. I also like The Telegraphand, to balance things out, The Guardian(UK Edition), and The New York Times. For news specific to Anthropology, Anthropology World News from Texas A&M Anthropology is the best.

I am looking forward to meeting you in class on the 14th. In the meantime, you might want to peruse the information in your Moodle folder at <https://moodle.umn.edu/>.

Right off the bat you might be interested in the textbooks for the course—there are five, in proper European tradition. . . . (You only need to read them, you do not have to memorize their contents—see note on open-book exams below.) Believe it or not, you will love them all. . . well most of them anyway. And they’re all inexpensive (buy used copies).

A note on the textbooks: Since this is a course on and about Europe, it will be taught European style, that is, as far as the texts are concerned, we will use several original books and one anthology rather than an American-style textbook edited specifically for classroom use.

The course anchor text is Europe in the Anthropological Imagination . . .

text

Parman, Susan.
Europe in the Anthropological Imagination.
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998.
is currently available on-line for $31.32-83.80 new, and $2.25 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)



The other texts include . . .

text 

 text text text 

Ernestine Friedl’s Vasilika: A Village in Modern Greece—a “master text” and a genuine classic in the study of the Anthropology of Europe—is currently available on-line for $35.00--52.12 new, and for as little as $00.01 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h).
(24 December 2015)

Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World,
is currently available online from about $11.82 new / $0.01 used, $12.99 Kindle [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)

Nan: The Life of an Irish Travelling Woman,
one of the really great anthropological biographies on a European
is currently available online from about $24.95 new / $2.94 used, $9.99 Kindle [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)

Inis Beag: Isle of Ireland,
is currently available online from about $24.99 new / $12.94 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable).
(24 December 2015)


Full information on the texts for Peoples and Cultures of Europe can be found at
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth3635/cetexts.html#title>

Textbooks are available from the following vendors . . .

UMD Bookstore | Amazon.com | Barnes and Noble
CampusBooks.com | Chegg [rental] | ecampus.com | half.com
booksprice.com | CheapestTextbooks.com | CourseSmart.com | TextbookMedia.com

| Direct Textbook |
|

More information on textbooks in general can be found at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/tr/trtextbooks.html>.

And thousands of books are available free online, full text versions, <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/reference/books.html>,
and might occasionally be useful in one or more of your other courses. One of those—a classic on the Aran Islands of Ireland [Inis Beag as the pseudonym above] on a featured site in this class,


The Aran Islands
by John M. Synge
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth3635/cetexts.html#AranIslands>.

Have a look.

Exams will be open-book essays constructed from a list of study questions that you help create, so it would be a good idea for you to have your own copy of each text, and it is a good idea that you take your reading notes right in your copy of the text itself.

One thing that you should keep in mind when approaching these readings, which I will talk more about as the class progresses, is that as mentioned above the exams are open-book. And for that you should normally just need to read the books carefully and be able to discuss them intelligently. That is, you should read these as if you had picked it/them up at an airport on the way to Dornoch, Scotland, or at neighborhood bookshop because you were interested in the subject and wanted to know more about it, like literally millions of people are doing in everyday life.

PLEASE NOTE: Some students are used to principally memorizing facts in classes. This class is not one where that is the focus.It is about investigating new topics, reading, listening, synthesizing ideas, thinking, exploring, and becoming familiar enough with the various subjects, peoples and places to carry on an intelligent conversation in modern-day society.

In short, this class aims to give you practice in critical thinking, and even creativity.
Critical thinking, involving evaluation and synthesis, has long been regarded as essential for success in the modern-day world. In recent years, actually for two decades, creativity has also become central to success, and "process skills" vital to creativity. Process skills involve "strategies to reframe challenges and extrapolate and transform information, and to accept and deal with ambiguity" (Pappano, "Learning to Think Outside the Box," The Nenw York Times EducationLife, 9 February 2014, 8). Laura Pappano, writer in residence at Wellesley Center for Women at Wellesley College, points out that "In 2010 'creativity' was the factor mos crucial for success found in an I.B.M. survey of 1,500 chief executives in 33 industries. These days 'creative' is the most used buzzword in LinkedIn profiles two years running" (2014, 8).

Here's a recent interesting article from Minnesota Public Radio . . .

How to choose college classes: 6 tips
--Tracy Mumford, Minnesota Public Radio News (10 September 2015)

TAPS, Canada’s leading Beer Magazine—in fact it’s THE BEER MAGAZINE—features this item from a similar class in one of its editorials (Winter 2011-2012, p. 2), so at least one former major Editor in Chief thinks it’s worth noting and imitating.

In a nutshell, ANTH 4616 Peoples and Cultures of Europe consists of three main segments:


I  Orientation and Background (slides)  
  Introduction  
  Basic Concepts  
  History  
  Theory  
  Methods and Techniques  
     
II  Explorations  
  Comparative / Cross-Cultural  
  Holistic  
  Ethnographic Case Studies from the Real World: Real People . . . Real Places from Around Europe  
     
III  Student Presentations on Term Research Project  
     

Towards the second half of the semester, once you have mastered the basic information relating to the People and Cultures of Europe, we will look (generally comparatively, cf., Main Characteristics of Anthropology) at a series of video materials from around Europe. We will actually start that the second day of class, but we’ll focus on visual case study video more towards the second half of the semester. The final section will focus on your research projects.

 

One of the four main characteristics of American Anthropology is fieldwork, "a primary research technique, involving “participant observation," which usually means living among the people one is interested in learning from and about. It would be wonderful if for anthropology classes we could just rent a bus or charter a plane and fly off for a year or more to learn first-hand from the people themselves. Money, time, and practicality prohibit that, so the next best things—when it comes to studying anthropology—is going to places and viewing subjects by video, and we will do a lot of that this semester. More information on Visual Anthropology is available on-line at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1604/visual_anthropology.html#title>.

With all of these materials you will be expected to share your ideas and comments with others in the Class Forum and wikis. I'm looking forward to that.

You will find that there is "an awful lot" of materials on-line—maybe even too many!

But don't worry. You will find the required materials center stage in your Moodle folder. Most of the rest of the materials are optional, but you may find that material useful in working on your class project.

Where to start?

Probably the best place is by having a quick look at the "First Day Handout" on-line at <http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth3635/cehandout_first-day.html>.

Then have a look at your Moodle Gradebook folder, which gives a nice listing of the actual requirements and due dates for the course. (You'll find the link for that in the upper-left-hand corner of the top of Block 1.)

 

Then have a look at the "Course Overview" in Block 1 (the top of page one) of your Moodle folder <https://moodle.umn.edu/>.

A word of caution. Moodle recommends that you use the Firefox browser (available free at <http://firefox.com>). The Windows Internet Explorer (IE) occasionally will not display items on your screen. These items will simply not be there on IE when they are fine on Moodle or even on Chrome. Microsoft Word should likewise not be used to cut and paste things to Moodle; bad things can happen to your file if you do—randomly. Almost every time you are asked to enter text in Moodle, you will see the message, “Please do not copy/paste text directly from Microsoft Word. See explanation here <http://www1.umn.edu/moodle/issues.html#10>.” Please pay attention to that request.

If you are new to the world of "technology" in general or Moodle in particular, don't worry too much about that. Things may not "work" for you at first, but hang in there and we'll help you along. (And they will work better in Firefox and if you do not cut and paste from your Word documents.)

So once again, welcome to Anth 3635 Peoples and Cultures of Europe. This will be a great course, and a great experience. You will see. . . .

Thanks for signing on for the Anthropology of Europe. I’m looking forward to seeing you on Thursday, the 14th , in Montagu Hall 208, at high noon.

Best of the Holiday Wishes to you . . .

I hope you had a great Boxing Day, and are having a good Christmas-Hanukkah-Kwanza season. Have a great New Year’s Evening and New Year’s Day and a great New Year. And have a good Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as well.

In Vienna and Budapest and throughout much of Europe people will be eating lintels on New Year’s Day. Eating lintels helps you have a great new year. I’ve tried them in both places, and it seems the Hungarian lentils work just slightly better than elsewhere. A Hungarian professor friend recently passed on some important information about New Year’s Day lentils: “Gabriella says that the heart (seeds) are important for the coming fortune. . . .” So on New Year’s Day, eat plenty of lentils and pay special attention to the hearts. . . .

My office hours and contact information (and other regular schedule information) can be found at
<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1602/pcoffice.html>.

Finally, laptops are welcome, in fact encouraged, in the classroom. Many find a laptop quite useful in following the class materials. You can, for example, download all of the slide materials used in class.

Your Moodle site is now on-line. Have a look at it at <moodle.umn.edu>.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to post them on Moodle or e-mail troufs@d.umn.edu.

See you on the 14th.

I hope you enjoy the holidays, and have a great New Year’s celebration!

Best Warm Wishes,

Tim Roufs
Duluth, MN
26 December 2015

P.S. If you are new to the world of "technology" don't worry too much about that. Things may not "work" for you at first, but hang in there and we'll help you along. If you have not used Moodle course management system before, you might find it helpful to view the orientation tutorial.

 

 

 

 

Parman text: Europe in the Anthropological Imagination.

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index

Cutting Costs for College Textbooks

general textbook information

 

Europe in the Anthropological Imagination,
is currently available on-line for $31.32-83.80 new, and $2.25 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)


Parman, Susan.
Europe in the Anthropological Imagination.
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998.
(ISBN: 0133374602)

"This is a provocative, reflective book about how American anthropologists study Europe. But, since anthropology has traditionally been defined as a field that studies the non-western, exotic Other, an anthropological study of Europe would appear to be a misnomer. In a larger sense, then, it offers insights into the manner in which ideas emerge and evolve within a discipline. The book is composed of fourteen essays by twelve anthropologists who address how, when, where, and why they first began to study Europe and the implications of those studies for the development of anthropology in general."

Review

Costa, Kelli Ann. "From Center to Margins: An Intellectual History of the Anthropology of Europe." Review of Susan Parman, ed. Europe in the Anthropological Imagination. Exploring Cultures. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, Inc., 1998. Humanities and Social Sciences Online (H-NET) H-SAE Society for the Anthropology of Europe <http://www.h-net.msu.edu/reviews/showrev.cgi?path=18384921682875>. 25 October 2005.

 

Table of Contents

  Preface
  Introduction: Europe in the Anthropological Imagination
   
Ch. 1 Strangers in a Crowded Field: American Anthropology in France
Ch. 2 Europe through the Back Door: Doing Anthropology in Greece
Ch. 3 Bringing the "Other" to the "Self": Kypseli—The Place and the Film
Ch. 4 Europe on Film
Ch. 5 Representing Italy
Ch. 6 Returning with the Emigrants: A Journey in Portuguese Ethnography
Ch. 7 Restless Continent: Migration and the Configuration of Europe
Ch. 8 Themes in the Anthropology of Ireland
Ch. 9 A Forty-Year Retrospective of the Anthropology of Former Yugoslavia
Ch. 10 Utter Otherness: Western Anthropology and East European Political Economy
Ch. 11 An Anthropology of the European Union, from Above and Below
Ch. 12 The Place of Europe in George P. Murdock's Anthropological Theory
Ch. 13 The Meaning of "Europe" in the American Anthropologist (Part I)
   
  Bibliography
  Index

H-SAE REVIEW: Costa on Parman, ed., Europe in the Anthropological Imagination

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
 

 

 

Ernestine Friedl.  Vasilika: A Village in Modern Greece.

is currently available on-line for $35.00--52.12 new, and for as little as $00.01 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h).
(24 December 2015)

Friedl, Ernestine.
Vasilika: A Village in Modern Greece.
Belmont, CA: Thompson Wadsworth, 2002*
(ISBN: 0030115450)
(Thomson-Wadsworth Case Studies in Anthropology ISBN: 0534971652)

*[As the purpose of this text is for you to have a look at one of the genuine "Master Texts" in the Anthropology of Europe--a classic--earlier editions of this text are also suitable for class.]

Table of Contents

  Preface and Acknowledgements
   
  Introduction
   
Ch. 1 The Village: As a Setting
    The Area Surrounding Vasilika
    Inside Vasilika
    Movement in and through the Village
     
Ch. 2 The Family: Economic Activities
    Major Crops
    Miscellaneous Crops
    Livestock
    Variations in Wealth
    Specialization of Labor
   
Ch. 3 The Family: Consumption Habits
    Inside Vasilika's Homes
    Cleanliness and Order
    Clothing
    Urbanity vs. Convenience
   
Ch. 4 The Family: Dowry and Inheritance; Formal Structure
    Inheritance by Sons
    Dowering the Daughter
    Negotiations, Courtship, and Marriage
    Disposition of Dower Property
    Division of the Patrimony
    Consequences of Dowry System
    Attitudes Toward the Dowry System
    Family and Kin Structure
   
Ch. 5 Human Relations
    Attitudes Toward Man and Nature
    Adult-Child Relationships
    Conversation and Argument
    Transmission of Value
    Noncompetitive Social Groupings
   
Ch. 6 The Village: As a Community
    The Village Government
    The Village School
    The Village Church
    Religious Feast Days
    The Villagers as Greeks
   
  Glossary
  References Cited
  Recommended Reading

Review:

Fred Gearing. American Anthropologist, New Series, Vol. 65, No. 5, Selected Papers in Method and Technique (Oct., 1963), pp. 1170-1172. (available on JSTORE)

 

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
 

 

 

Mark Kurlansky. Cod: A biography of the Fish That Changed the World.

is currently available online from about $11.82 new / $0.01 used, $12.99 Kindle [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)

Kurlansky, Mark.
Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World.
NY: Penguin Books, 1998.
(ISBN : 0140275010)

"You probably enjoy eating codfish, but reading about them? Mark Kurlansky has written a fabulous book--well worth your time--about a fish that probably has mattered more in human history than any other. The cod helped inspire the discovery and exploration of North America. It had a profound impact upon the economic development of New England and eastern Canada from the earliest times. Today, however, overfishing is a constant threat. Kurlansky sprinkles his well-written and occasionally humorous history with interesting asides on the possible origin of the word codpiece and dozens of fish recipes. Sometimes a book on an offbeat or neglected subject really makes the grade. This is one of them."

From Library Journal

"In this engaging history of a '1000-year fishing spree,' Kurlansky . . . traces the relationship of cod fishery to such historical eras and events as medieval Christianity and Christian observances; international conflicts between England and Germany over Icelandic cod; slavery, the molasses trade, and the dismantling of the British Empire; and, the evolution of a sophisticated fishing industry in New England. Kurlansky relates this information in an entertaining style while providing accurate scientific information. The story does not have a happy ending, however. The cod fishery is in trouble, deep trouble, as the Atlantic fish has been fished almost to extinction. Quoting a scientist from the Woods Hole Biological Laboratory, Massachusetts, Kurlansky notes that to forecast the recovery of the cod population is to gamble: 'There is only one known calculation: 'When you get to zero, it will produce zero.'"

Cod received the James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing and was a New York Public Library Best Book of 1997.

 

Table of Contents

Prologue: Sentry on the Headlands (So Close to Ireland)

PART ONE: A FISH TALE

Ch. 1   "The Race to Codlandia"
Ch. 2   "With Mouth wide Open"
Ch. 3   "The Cod Rush"
Ch. 4   "1620: The Rock and the Cod"
Ch. 5   "Certain Inalienable Rights"
Ch. 6   "A Cod War Heard 'Round the World"

PART TWO: LIMITS

Ch. 7   "A Few New ideas Versus Nine Million Eggs"
Ch. 8   "The Last Two Ideas"
Ch. 9   "Iceland Discovers the Finite Universe"
Ch. 10 "Three Wars to Close the Open Sea"

PART THREE: THE LAST HUNTERS

Ch. 11 "Requiem for the Grand Banks"
Ch. 12 "The Dangerous Waters of Nature's Resilience"
Ch. 13 "Bracing for the Spanish Armada"
Ch. 14 "Bracing for the Canadian Armada"

A COOK'S TALE: SIX CENTURIES OF COD RECIPES

Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Index

 

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
 

 

 

Front Cover of Nan: The Life of an Irish Traveling Woman, Revised Edition.

is currently available online from about $24.95 new / $2.94 used, $9.99 Kindle [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable, at amazon.com & eligible for Amazon Prime).
(24 December 2015)


(26 December 2013)

Gmelch, Sharon
Nan: The Life of an Irish Travelling Woman, Revised Edition.
Long Grove: IL: Waveland Press, 1991.
(ISBN: 0881336025)

From Publishers Weekly

"Ireland's tinkers or 'Travellers,' pariahs in their own land, are a sociological anomaly, fast disappearing in contemporary Ireland. In 1971 Gmelch, a New York professor of anthropology, took up residence in Holylands, an official campsite set up outside Dublin by the government to keep tinkers off the roads. She moved there to become better acquainted with Nan, a Traveller born in 1919 in a tent in the Irish midlands. Nan's oral history, her self-described 'awful mixup of a life,'' takes us into the Travellers' periods of pleasant, patched-together domesticity that are inevitably shattered by violence and marital crises, usually precipitated by drink. Nan's marriages, her 18 children, the shocking physical abuse perpetrated by one husband, did not break her, and even allowed her a little happiness. Nan's story provides a unique perspective on 20th century Irish history." PW. (May 27)

From Library Journal

"Nan Donohoe's life story is told, most ly in her own words, as representative of the native Irish gypsies known as travellers, or tinkers. It is a story of the will to survive despite poverty, disease, illiteracy, abuse, and well-intentioned but ineffective bureaucratic interfer ence. For generations these itinerants peddled wares and services to the rural populace. After World War II, with mass produced goods and machinery readily available to farmers, their means of livelihood vanished and they began to camp nearer urban centers, causing great social problems. They are now mostly in government camps and receiving welfare because assimilation into the mainstream appears impossi ble. Similarities with the migrant farm worker in the United States abound. For specialist and lay reader alike." -- Sondra Brunhumer, Western Michigan Univ. Libs., Kalamazoo

Contents

  FOREWORD
  PREFACE / PREFACE 1991
   
I
Nan
II
The Sweep's Daughter
III
The Kitchen Maid
IV
The Unwilling Wife
V
Travelling in the North
VI
Never the Same After
VII
Galway
VIII
Dublin
IX
Birmingham
X
Holylands
XI
The Old One
   
  EPILOGUE
  NOTES
  FURTHER READING
  PHOTOGRAPHS

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
 

 

 

John Messenger.  Innis Beag: Isle of Ireland.

(availble online only)

is currently available online from about $24.99 new / $12.94 used [buy a used one]
(+ p/h, where applicable).
(24 December 2015)

Messenger, John C.
Inis Beag: Isle of Ireland.
Long Grove: IL: Waveland Press, 1983.
(ISBN: 0881330515)

"Inis Beag is a fictitious name for one of the many inhabited, rocky, barren islands of the Irish Gaeltacht. Messenger's descriptive analysis of this closed community includes the subsistence, material culture, social organization/control, and religion/values dimensions, as well as a strong focus on folklore, Christian reinterpretations of pagan elements, music, song, and dance. A very human picture emerges of these islanders, folk people in almost every respect."

Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction

1. The Island and Its Past
2. The Land and the Sea
3. The Village and the Family
4. The Supernatural and the Esthetic
5. The Future of the Island

References
Recommened Reading

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
 

 

Also highly recommended,
with full-text on-line
at no cost:
Illustration from The Aran Islands by John M. Synge, 1907.
The Aran Islands

highly recommended
a classic from one-hundred years ago

(full-text available free on-line)

John Millington Synge
The Aran Islands
John W. Luce and Company, 1907
(full-text on-line)

short biography of John Millington Synge -- Wikipedia

"Nothing much happens on the Aran Islands--at least, not much went on there in the late 19th century, when John Synge sailed out to these mist-shrouded, salt-sprayed, and wave-battered chunks of rocks south of Ireland. Therein lies the charm of the setting and of this lovely book, which captures the saltiness of both the marine air and the time-lost characters, who deeply believe in the magical "wee people." In cottages where nets and fishing tackle hang from beams, the women (who always wear red dresses and petticoats, as do some of the boys) sit at their spinning wheels or sew cow-skin sandals, while the fishermen spin yarns about fairies, sunken vessels, and bags of gold gained from adulterous wives. The big happening of the year is when roofs are rethatched--an event that blossoms into a festival with twisted rope stretching from kitchen table through lane to nearby field. Synge seems an ambassador from a different world: addressed as "noble person," he brings tokens of modernity--be they clocks or simple magic tricks that beguile the locals. First published in 1907, this re-released travelogue gives a poignant peek into another time and begs a visit to the Aran Islands to see how, or if, they have changed." -- Melissa Rossi

The above text refers to the paperback edition.

Table of Contents

Title Page
Introduction
Author's Foreword

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV

to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
to top of page / A/Z index   to top of page / A-Z index
  • Other Articles Available On-Line

  • Sárkány, Mihály. (26 October 2005). “Cultural and Social Anthropology in Central and Eastern Europe.” Knowledge Base Social Sciences in Eastern Europe
    <http://www.cee-socialscience.net/archive/anthropology/article1.html>.

  • Articles/postings as recommended from H-SAE (H-Net on-line academic
    discussion web site of the Society for the Anthropology of Europe)
    <http://www.h-net.msu.edu/~sae/>.


  • Gannon, Martin J. (2004). Chapter 17, “The Traditional British House.” Understanding Global Cultures, 3rd. ed., pp. 221-237. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    • no longer available from UM DULUTH Library Reserve Online

  • Gannon, Martin J. (2004). Chapter 21, “The Italian Opera.” Understanding Global Cultures, 3rd. ed., pp. 285-302. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    • no longer available from UM DULUTH Library Reserve Online

  • Gannon, Martin J. (2004). Chapter 25, “The Spanish Bullfight.” Understanding Global Cultures, 3rd. ed., pp. 351-365. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    • no longer available from UM DULUTH Library Reserve Online

  • Gannon, Martin J. (2004). Chapter 26, “The Portuguese Bullfight.” Understanding Global Cultures, 3rd. ed., pp. 367-375. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    • no longer available from UM DULUTH Library Reserve Online

  • Gannon, Martin J. (2004). Chapter 22, “Belgian Lace.” Understanding Global Cultures, 3rd. ed., pp. 303-318. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
    • no longer available from UM DULUTH Library Reserve Online


  • Related Bibiligraphy
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