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Peoples and Cultures of Europe

Spring 2015 Calendar
Saturday, 25 October 2014, 18:02 (06:02 PM) CDT, day 298 of 2014

Saturday, 25 October 2014, 23:02 (11:02 PM) GMT, day 298 of 2014
Today in History
Today in Headlines
Word of the Day

Babel Fish Translation
~ translate this page
OWL (Online Writing Lab) Purdue University.

topics and resources

World Clock Time

~ Google advanced
 
~ Google scholar
~ Google books
 
~ Google images
~ Google Translate
 
~ Blenco Search
 
 
Wikipedia Europe
Lists and Tables
Maps
  ~ Europe
    ~ Central   ~ Southern
    ~ Eastern   ~ Southeastern
      ("Balkans")
    ~ Northern   ~ Western
   
Wikipedia / Wiktionary
 
The World Fact Book -- CIA
 
UMD Library Main Catalog
 
BBC News: Europe

Society for the Anthropology of Europe

Countries, Cultures, Regions, and Territories of Europe

 presentations  
 topics and resources

see also Understanding Global Cultures
  Wikipedia
  Coins of the Eurozone
  Euro banknotes
  Eurozone fiscal matters
 European Studies
  language dictionaries
  BBC News: Europe EurostatEuropa (EU)


Europa and the Bull, Moreay.

Europa and the Bull

Enlèvement d'Europe
  Nöel-Nicolas Coypel, c. 1726

Peoples and Cultures of Europe
Final Exam


The Peoples and Cultures of Europe Final Exam is scheduled for 08:00-9:55 p.m., Friday, 14 May 2015, in Cina 214


REM: Bring your Laptop
Laptop
Firefox
Moodle Exams (and everything else on Moodle) works best with a Firefox

browser. If you do not have a Firefox browser on your laptop, download one (it's free).

The CE Final Exam Live Chat will be Thursday, 14 May 2015, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Sign in on Moodle logo. in the Week 15 Panel.

Makeup Exam Information

Blue book for exams.

How long should your answers be?

Answer: About the same length as Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

The question of length is a good one. It's also a difficult one to answer as it depends on the question itself, your style of writing, the detail which you give to your examples, and—since this is an open-book exam where you basically could prepare questions in advance and then cut and paste from other sources (with proper credit given to those sources)—a good answer can vary quite a bit in length.

At a minimum you should have a beginning, a middle, and an end (sometimes also known as introduction, body, conclusion).

You should also be sure to answer the question(s) asked, and if there are two, three or more parts to a question, be sure to answer all of them.

Be sure to give examples when you make a statement.

I think it is a good thing to have a look at the OWL's advice before every exam:

Writing Essays for Exams
 OWL logo--Online Writing Lab, Purdue University

To use their recommendations, a well focused, well organized, well supported, well packaged essay answer could be done (for most of the questions) in the equivalent of about a page and a half to two "normal" pages (double-spaced, one-inch margins, #11 or #12 font)—which is about 375-500 words.

How long was the Gettysburg Address?

263 or 268 or 270 words depending on which printed version you check

A standard "letter size" 8-1/2 X 11 sheet of paper has about 255 words, with a size 12 font

So your answer should be about one page long, two if you use the Owl's recommendations

 

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General Information

assignments summary

Sample Final Exam Format

Check your grade in your Moodle logo. Gradebook

Use "The Curve" to figure out your letter grade

     ~ "The Strike Zone"

     ~ Information on Standard Deviation (sometimes useful for interpreting your grade)

Criteria for Grading College Papers

Academic Integrity Policies

Incompletes

General Information

  • The Peoples and Cultures of Europe Final Exam is scheduled for 08:00-9:55 p.m., Friday, 14 May 2015, in Cina 214


    REM: Bring your Laptop
    Laptop
    Firefox
    Moodle Exams (and everything else on Moodle) works best with a Firefox

    browser. If you do not have a Firefox browser on your laptop, download one (it's free).


    [4 questions randomly generated from a pool of questions made up of the questions from the Final Exam wiki for up to 400 points]

  • Once you begin you exam you will have two and one-half hours to complete it

    • BE SURE TO UPLOAD ALL OF YOUR ANSWERS BEFORE YOUR TIME EXPIRES

    • MOODLE WILL NOT ALLOW YOU TO UPLOAD YOUR ANSWERS AFTER TIME HAS ELAPSED

  • The Final will be an open-book essay exam

    • Essay exams usually provide a better learning experience and, in addition, afford practice in writing

    • You may bring and use your texts, dictionary, thesaurus, a writing handbook, class handouts, notes, outlines, drafts, memos, a laptop, and a Ouija board. You may also use references and materials from your other classes and the web, with the caveat, of course, that you properly cite any sources you use.

    • F2F folks may bring and use your laptop

      • but you must upload your exam to your Moodle folder at the end of the exam period

Final Exam

  • The exam will cover materials up to and including the end of Week 15

  • Some of the questions will be cumulative, but most will focus on the materials covered since the midsemester exam.

  • This includes the lecture materials, in-class videos, e-mails, the Forum, the basic introductory materials of the text, and the text and class materials.

  • There will also be questions available on the final asking you to compare and contrast things in two or more items included in the entire semester

    • these comparison/contrast questions will include countries covered earlier in the semester

  • This is an open-book exam

    • You may bring and use your texts, dictionary, thesaurus, a writing handbook, class handouts, notes, outlines, drafts, and memos

    • You may also use references and materials from your other classes, with the caveat, of course, that you properly cite any sources you use

    • You may bring and use their laptop

      • but you must upload your exam to your Moodle folder at the end of the exam period

      • REM: Be sure to have your batteries charged

      • Please be prepared to upload the entire exam as one file

      • NOTE: It does not work simply to type in the .rtf extension on an existing .wps file. You must load the original document and then resave it as a .rtf file type

  • The final exam counts up to 400 points (4 X up to 100)

  • You must answer the four (4) questions on the final randomly generated by “James” from the pool of questions put together from the study questions on the Wiki. Each question is worth up to 100 points each. They may include . . .

    • At least one current affairs question

      There could also be one question on a major topic during the semester that for one reason or another doesn’t happen to end up in the Wiki list. You could also have on your exam a theoretical question on a major topic that may also have not made it onto the Wiki list (one that attempts to have you bring together and synthesize various major topics of the semester).

      • You could also have on your exam one theoretical question on a major topic that may also have not made it onto the Wiki list (one that attempts to have you bring together and synthesize various major topics of the semester)

    A caveat: there is always a possibility that there might be some very last-minute fast-breaking current-affairs news announced (that’s announced too late to make it onto the Wiki list) that might also be included in the pool from which the four questions are taken. But it would have to be closely related to a topic that you have studied during the semester.

  • There will be a live Final Exam chat on Moodle—for last-minute questions about the exam. Join in; the live chat for the midterm was fun, and useful.

The CE Final Exam Live Chat will be Thursday, 14 May 2015, 7:00-8:00 p.m. Sign in on Moodle logo. in the Week 15 Panel.

*(The total number of points available for the forum postings will depend on new discoveries and announcements that appear during the semester. New topics will be added as appropriate. In the end, "participation" will likely account for about 25% of your grade)

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Sample Exam Questions

Anthropology: Peoples and Cultures of Europe

End of Term Exam Format

25 October 2014

Answer the FOUR (4) questions provided by "James" Moodle. Keep in mind that there is more than one approach you can take in answering these questions. Follow these guidelines:

  • Organize your answer before you begin

  • Where appropriate, be sure to state:
    • What or who something is
    • Where it occurred or is located
    • Why it is important
    • When it occurred
    • How it happened or how it works

  • State YOUR position or approach clearly

  • Cite specific examples or references to support your statements

  • Mention problem areas or other relevant materials which you would like to consider further in a more thorough statement. That is, when you're finished with your answer, what major questions are still left unanswered?

  • Summarize your argument or discussion

  • Where appropriate use materials from more than one region of the world

  • Remember that your responses should have a beginning, a middle, and an end

  • Do not discuss any topic or country at length in more than one question

  • For the questions indicated, do not write on any country for which you were one of the presentors

 


This kind of question would generally be something like:

Exam II:

Much class time for the first part of the term was devoted to looking at how anthropology developed Europe as a "cultural area." How does what you have learned in Ireland support or disclaim the arguments of Susan Parman and others about the development of Europe in the Anthropological Imagination?

 

Image

 

On the exam there may also be one or more questions asking you to compare what happened in Part II of the course with what happened in Part I

This kind of question would generally be something like:

Exam II:

Argue for the proposition that Susannah Hoffman, in making the film Kypseli , was actually making myth and constructing images -- similarly to what Robert J. Flaherty did with Man of Aran--rather than making an ethnographically accurate and objective film about the people of the community of Kypseli.

Include in your argument, as a part of your answer, comparison and contrast analysis with both Hoffman's work and with Flaherty's work.

Exam II:

From the CE forum:

"In Inis Beag: Isle of Ireland, John C. Messenger writes:

“Inis Beag as much as any community is characterized by gossip, ridicule, and opprobrium, which gain their effectiveness as social control mechanisms from the deep concern of the folk with ‘saving face,' and which serve to limit freedom of action and behavioral idiosyncrasy.” (p. 66)

"Discuss the evidence Messenger cites to support this statement."

Exam II:

From the CE forum:

"What is Flaherty's legacy on the Aran Islands?

"We saw in The Man of Aran that Flaherty was working on trying to show how man was against the elements. Life on the islands is hard work. Day in and day out the people of the island are working against the sea, the land and the wind. All of these natural elements make life very hard. We saw the next day [in the video in class] that many of the islanders feel that Flaherty took things out of context. There is now [electrical] power on the island and ferries that take tourists to the island and also take essential products to those in need. There seem to be two sides to the debate over the Aran Islands."

"Question: Discuss in detail “. . . the two sides to the debate over the Aran Islands” as outlined and described in this question."

Exam II:

From the CE forum:

"Describe the differences between the film Man of Aran and the realities as shown in How the Myth was Made."

Exam II:

From the CE forum:

"Specifically, what are the differences between the agriculture one sees in the videos Man of Aran compared to the Kypesli video, and in the monographs Inish Beag compared with Vasilika? In detail describe how these types of agriculture shape the lives of the people in these peasant villages."

  • But, there will also be questions asking you to compare what happened in Part II of the course with what happened in Part I

  1. Current Affairs [if there is an appropriate subect in the news the week of or before the exam]:

  2. One of the paired tasks for the last part of the term assigned Ch. XX from tba, " . . . ," with Ch. YY from tbaon ". . . ." Compare and contrast the article from Ch. XX of tba with Ch. YY in tba. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country disussed in Ch. YY of tba].

    [There may be more than one question like question 1 on the exam.]

  3. Compare and contrast Ch. ZZ from tba on " . . . " with the class presentation on [that country]. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country in question].

  4. In " tba," tba talks about "X" and describes [a country] as "X." Discuss tba use of the term "X" and analyze the application of that concept to [the country indicated]. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country in question].

  5. Discuss X of a people [or a country]. As part of your answer include some discussion on how you are like and unlike the [people of the country] with regard to X. Do not select a country if you were one of the presentors of [the country].

  6. Assume that you just signed up for a UMD year-long Study Abroad Program and selected the option to live with a family. You will be staying in with. . . . Discuss how what you learned from Ch. X of Understanding Global Cultures, " . . . ," might help you in your adjustment to the family you are staying with. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country].

  7. Ch. X of Understanding Global Cultures discusses "Y." This chapter talks about [a feature of the text] which. . . . Why? Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on [the country].

  8. Relate the study of X in this class (tba) to what you have been studying in tba Europe in the Modern Age. Do not select this question if you were one of the presenters on X.

  9. tba' subtitle is " tba." tba presents many articles viewing America from outsiders' points of view. . . . compare and contrast at least five tba' authors' treatment of [the X aspect] of American culture.

  10. Write an analytic essay on the X of America/Americans as expressed by the authors in tba.

  11. Discuss the pros and cons of the use of X in understanding global cultures. Be sure to give specific examples to back up your statements.

  12. Discuss what you have learned about the importance of X from looking at X cross culturally in the chapters from both tba and tba and from the presentations in class. Be sure to give specific examples to back up your statements.

  13. [An opinion question, asking you to appraise and evaluate one or more essays, might be included; an example of such a question would read something like the sample question on the midterm exam.]

  14. It has been said that X can be understood in terms of Y. Discuss X and indicate what you think the relevance of this might be to modern-day Global studies. Do not select any country for which you were one of the presentors.

  15. tba uses the word / term "X." Discuss the concept of "X" as Gannon uses it in tba. Be sure to include examples in your discussion.

  16. In the newspaper this week there was an article on X. The following quote summarizes the authors' position:
  1. Cultural/Social Change, Process, Historical Perspective:

    There is likely to be one question asking about cultural/social change, process (how things change, develop . . .), and/or about a historical perspective. This question could be one of the "comparison/contrast" questions above (for e.g., compare Vasilika of the 1950s with rural contemporary rural village Greece), or it could be a longer-appearing question, which would give some background reading material and then ask you to compare that materials to what you have seen/learned in class. The following is an example of the latter type of questions:

From John Millington Synge , an Irish dramatist, poet, prose writer, and collector of folklore (16 April 1871 -- 24 March 1909) . . . .

Aran.

John M. Synge
The Aran Islands
1907

One hundred years ago John Millington Synge, who first went to the Aran Islands in 1898, from Paris, wrote upon his arrival to the Aran Islands – “a secluded region west of Galway Bay that symbolized the Eden of the Irish cultural renaissance”:

Every article on these islands has an almost personal character, which gives this simple life, where all art is unknown, something of the artistic beauty of medieval life. The curaghs [their traditional boats made of canvas and wood] and spinning-wheels, the tiny wooden barrels that are still much used in the place of earthenware, the home-made cradles, churns, and baskets, are all full of individuality, and being made from materials that are common here, yet to some extent peculiar to the island, they seem to exist as a natural link between the people and the world that is about them.

The simplicity and unity of the dress increases in another way the local air of beauty. . . . (pp. 9-10)

And Synge writes, in 1898:

On the low sheets of rock to the east I can see a number of red and grey figures hurrying about their work. The continual passing in this island between the misery of last night and the splendor of to-day, seems to create an affinity between the moods of these people and the moods of varying rapture and dismay that are frequent in artists, and in certain forms of alienation. Yet it is only in the intonation of a few sentences or some old fragment of melody that I catch the real spirit of the island, for in general the men sit together and talk with endless iteration of the tides and fish, and of the price of kelp in Connemara.” . . . (p. 25)

This continual danger, which can only be escaped by extraordinary personal dexterity, has had considerable influence on the local character, as the waves have made it impossible for clumsy, foolhardy, or timid men to live on these islands.” (p. 43)

“The women are the great conservative force in this matter of the language. They learn a little English in school and from their parents, but they rarely have occasion to speak with any one who is not a native of the islands, so their knowledge of the foreign tongue remains rudimentary. In my cottage I have never heard a word of English from the women except when they were speaking to the pigs or to the dogs, or when the girl was reading a letter in English. Women, however, with a more assertive temperament, who have had, apparently, the same opportunities, often attain a considerable fluency, as is the case with one, a relative of the old woman of the house, who often visits here.” (p. 60)

“These people make no distinction between the natural and the supernatural.” (p. 72)

“Like all work that is done in common on the island, the thatching is regarded as a sort of festival.” (p. 75)

“It is likely that much of the intelligence and charm of these people is due to the absence of any division of labour, and to the correspondingly wide development of each individual, whose varied knowledge and skill necessitates a considerable activity of mind. Each man can speak two languages. He is a skilled fisherman, and can manage a curagh with extraordinary nerve and dexterity He can farm simply, burn kelp, cut out pampooties, mend nets, build and thatch a house, and make a cradle or a coffin. His work changes with the seasons in a way that keeps him free from the dullness that comes to people who have always the same occupation. The danger of his life on the sea gives him the alertness of the primitive hunter, and the long nights he spends fishing in his curagh bring him some of the emotions that are thought peculiar to men who have lived with the arts.” (p. 77)

“I have never heard talk so simple and so attractive as the talk of these people. This evening they began disputing about their wives, and it appeared that the greatest merit they see in a woman is that she should be fruitful and bring them many children. As no money can be earned by children on the island this one attitude shows the immense difference between these people and the people of Paris.”

“The direct sexual instincts are not weak on the island, but they are so subordinated to the instincts of the family that they rarely lead to irregularity. The life here is still at an almost patriarchal stage, and the people are nearly as far from the romantic moods of love as they are from the impulsive life of the savage.“ (pp. 87-88)

 

Question:

From what you know about Aran from the film Man of Aran [1934], and from Inis Beag [1983], and from class [2003-2006], how would the tone and content of what Synge said a hundred years ago fit Aran Island life in the mid-and late- twentieth century?

 

 

[One of the texts or chapters or articles or videos] is called X . . . . Discuss the significance of [that title or section of the book or video] to anthropological studies of Europe.

This kind of question would generally be something like:

Exam II:

In Inis Beag: Isle of Ireland , John C. Messenger writes:

“Inis Beag as much as any community is characterized by gossip, ridicule, and opprobrium, which gain their effectiveness as social control mechanisms from the deep concern of the folk with ‘saving face,' and which serve to limit freedom of action and behavioral idiosyncrasy.” (p. 66)

Discuss the evidence Messenger cites to support this statement.

[quote will be inserted here].

How would you interpret X from the point of view of what you learned in your tba class this term?

Italy

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Moodle
Makeup Exams
  1. With prior consent of the instructor, you may take makeup exams at any of the times scheduled by the Sociology-Anthropology Department. These times will also be announced in class. Pick up your makeup exam in Cina 228, not the classroom.

  2. It usually takes several days for makeup exams to be returned to you

  3. Makeup Exam scores will be posted as soon as they are ready on the web on Moodle logo..

  4. Use "The Curve" to figure out your letter grade

 



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