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. Saturday, 19 June 2021, 22:51 (10:51 PM) CDT, day 170 of 2021 .
 
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Sicilian ice-cream in a bread bun. A good solution to a local problem: the Mediterranean heat quickly melts the ice-cream, which is absorbed by the bread.
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Food Trivia Question

Why, in Austria, is a Wiener schnitzel protected by law, but a Weiner würst not protected?

Monday, the 9th of September is National Wienerschnitzel Day, and in Austria “and there's even an online Schnitzel Museum dedicated to promoting it.”

Spaghetti with meatballs
 Wikimedia: Kobako

“The Wiener schnitzel (literally: ‘Viennese schnitzel’) is as emblematic of the Austrian capital as Baroque palaces and classical composers. Any restaurant worth its breadcrumbs here features the pan-fried veal cutlet alongside sweet and vinegary Austrian potato salad, or even French fries. But schnitzel culture goes beyond the table: local Viennese groups have organised festivals to celebrate schnitzel, arguably Austria's most prominent national dish. The 9 September is designated National Wiener Schnitzel Day, and there's even an online Schnitzel Museum dedicated to promoting, as it proclaims, the ‘Austrian cultural property” and showing “how much Wiener schnitzel [has] shaped Austrian culture.’”

“Today, the term ‘Wiener schnitzel’ enjoys protected legal status in Austria and Germany. Under Austrian culinary code, the term may only refer to a slice of veal coated in egg, flour and breadcrumbs that’s then fried. Pork, a popular veal substitute, must be labelled as ‘Wiener schnitzel vom Schwein’ (‘from pork’), or just as ‘schnitzel’.” -- BBCtravel (06 August 2019)

A "Wiener würst", on the other hand, is simply a Viennese "sausage" traditionally made of pork and beef, and is not protected by the European Union's Protected designation of origin (PDO). In Vienna (Wein) a weiner is generally called a Frankfurter Würstl.


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