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Saturday, 19 April 2014, 02:31 (02:31 AM) CDT, day 109 of 2014
 

Prehistoric Cultures

Fall 2012 Calendar -- DAY [archive]
  Fall 2012 Calendar -- EVENING [archive]

 

"Ardi" stood about 47 inches (120 centimeters) tall and weighed about 110 pounds (50 kilograms).

"'Ardi' stood about 47 inches (120 centimeters) tall and weighed about 110 pounds (50 kilograms)."
National Geographic

 
Ardipithecus ramidis

"Ardi"

(chart)

| General Information | Australopithecus | Paranthropus | Kenyanthropus

Ardipithecus -- Wikipedia

search Ardipithecus on JSTOR

This row of images shows the male canine condition of Ardipithecus ramidus (center digital image) intermediate in size between humans (left) and chimpanzees. The reduced size of canine teeth is an indication of a shift in social behavior away from male-male aggression, and is one of the hallmarks of the human lineage.

"This row of images shows the male canine condition of Ardipithecus ramidus (center digital image) intermediate in size between humans (left) and chimpanzees. The reduced size of canine teeth is an indication of a shift in social behavior away from male-male aggression, and is one of the hallmarks of the human lineage."
National Geographic

 

A fairly complete skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, which replaced Lucy as the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree.

"A fairly complete skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, which replaced Lucy as the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree."
National Geographic

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Moodle

In the News . . .

See also below

 top of page /\  A-Z index
Moodle

 

In the news . . .

PCforum: Topic 2 -- Why the Big Fuss Over "Ardi"?
f2009

In one of it's biggest splashes ever,
Texas A&M's "Anthropology in the News" on 10 October 2009 announced

"Ardi"

Ardipithecus ramidis,
a species featured in this week's Science
<http://www.sciencemag.org/ardipithecus/>

A fairly complete skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, which replaced Lucy as the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree.

"A fairly complete skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus, which replaced Lucy as the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree."

More photos from The New York Times

Fossil Skeleton From Africa Predates Lucy
-- New York Times
(01 October 2009)

1 - Ancient Skeleton May Rewrite Earliest Chapter of Human Evolution
- Science
(01 October 2009)


2 - Our Ancestor: Not Chimp, Not Human
-- Live Science
(01 October 2009)

3 - Before 'Lucy,' There Was 'Ardi': First Major Analysis Of Early Hominid Published In Science
-- Science Daily (01 October 2009)

4 - Move Over, Lucy; Ardi May Be Oldest Human Ancestor
-- NPR
(01 October 2009)

5 - Discovery in Ethiopia casts light on human origins
-- Reuters
(02 October 2009)

6 - Fossils radically alter ideas about the look of man's earliest ancestors
-- Los Angeles Times
(01 October 2009)

7 - Oldest "Human" Skeleton Found--Disproves "Missing Link"
-- National Geographic News
(01 October 2009)

8 - PHOTOS: Oldest "Human" Skeleton Refutes "Missing Link"
-- National Geographic News
(01 October 2009)

9 - Fossil Ardi reveals the first steps of the human race
-- Guardian
(01 October 2009)

10 - 'Ardi:' 4.4 Million-Year-Old Fossil is Oldest Human Ancestor
-- ABC News
(01 October 2009)

11 - Oldest hominid skeleton provides new evidence for human evolution
-- EurekAlert
(01 October 2009)

12 - 'Ardi,' Oldest Human Ancestor, Unveiled
-- Discovery News
(01 October 2009)

13 - Partial skeleton gives ancient hominids a new look
-- Science News
(01 October 2009)

14 - World’s oldest human-linked skeleton found
-- MSNBC
(01 October 2009)

15 - 'Ardi' May Rewrite the Story of Humans
-- Washington Post
(02 October 2009)

16 - Oldest hominid skeleton revealed
-- Nature
(01 October 2009)

17 - Our ancestor Ardi walked tall
-- New Scientist
(01 October 2009)

18 - Fossil finds extend human story
-- BBC News
(01 October 2009)

19 - Humanity Has New 4.4 Million-Year-Old Baby Mama
-- Wired

(01 October 2009)


20 - Ardi's Secret: Did Early Humans Start Walking for Sex?
-- National Geographic News (01 October 2009)

21 - Researchers Unearth A Hominid More Ancient Than Lucy
-- NPR (02 October 2009)

22 - Creationists Say Science and Bible Disprove 'Ardi' Fossil Is Evidence of Evolution
-- ABC News (2009-10-07)

23 - Fossil rewrites early human evolution
-- Nature (2009-10-06)

24 - Yes, Ardi Evolved From Apes
-- Science (2009-10-07)

25 - Early hominid first walked on 2 legs in the woods
-- EurekAlert (2009-10-08)

26 - Early Hominid First Walked On Two Legs In The Woods
-- ScienceDaily (2009-10-08)

 

Have a look at two or more of the above articles,
and the course Ardipithecus ramidis page

<http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/anth1602/pcardipithecus.html#title>

Questions:

Why do you think there is this big fuss over "Ardi"?

Do you think this qualifies as "a major discovery"
talked about on the first day of class?

Why or why not?

 

From the text . . .

Key Pre-Australopith Discoveries.

Key Pre-Australopith Discoveries.
Understanding Humans, 10th Ed., p. 216


Table 9-3 estimated Cranial Capacities in Early Hominins with Comparable Data for Modern Great Apes and Humans.

Table 9-3 estimated Cranial Capacities in Early Hominins
with Comparable Data for Modern Great Apes and Humans.
Understanding Humans, 10th Ed., p. 225
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Discovering Ardi, Discovery Channel.

 

Orrorin / Ardipithecus / Australopithecus / Kenyanthropus

Subfamily
Genus
Species
Example
Alternative Name
 
"Ardi"
 

Australo-
pithecines

anamensis

   

afarensis

"Lucy"

 

africanus

 Taung

 

 garhi

   

 aethiopicus

 "Black Skull"

Paranthropus

(aka A. robustus)

 boisei

 "Zinj"

 robustus

 Swartkrans

 
platyops
"Flat-faced Kenya Man"  
 
Orrorin
tugenensis
"Millenium Man"
 

Adapted from Intoduction to Physical Anthropology, 8th ed, Jurmain, Nelson, Kilgore, and Trevathand
(Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning, 2000, pp. 285 - 290).

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he Middle Awash study area, where the Ardipithecus bones were found, is on the Awash River about 140 miles (230 kilometers) from the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa.

"The Middle Awash study area, where the Ardipithecus bones were found,
is on the Awash River about 140 miles (230 kilometers) from the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa."
National Geographic

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A. ramidus (artist's reconstruction, center) was adapted both to climbing in the trees and walking on the ground, according to researchers who studied its fossils. In this illustration, a reconstruction of A. ramidus appears between a silhouette of a chimpanzee (left) and one of Australopithecus afarensis, all scaled to be the same height.

"A. ramidus (artist's reconstruction, center) was adapted both to climbing in the trees and walking on the ground, according to researchers who studied its fossils. In this illustration, a reconstruction of A. ramidus appears between a silhouette of a chimpanzee (left) and one of Australopithecus afarensis, all scaled to be the same height."
National Geographic

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