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Canvas

Anthropology
  Senior Seminar


  Spring 2018:   Calendar   Syllabus (.pdf)
Mustard seed.



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 Canvas

Course Expectations and Requirements Summary
Anthropology Senior Seminar

See also Course Overview

Prof. David Syring, who normally teaches this course, expresses its spirit and objectives very well, with goals and sentiments that we all in Anthropology at UMD share . . .

"What you are expected to contribute to the course"

"As an instructor, my philosophy is that learning is not something that I can simply give you. It is something that you have to create for yourself. My job is to help you by providing tools for learning (i.e., readings, guest speakers, lectures, films) and challenging experiences that encourage you actively to explore ideas (i.e., in-class discussions, writing assignments, creative opportunities)."

"So, as I see it, your responsibilities are to find ways to make your learning active. That includes reading thoroughly, coming to class prepared to talk about your readings, being willing to make informed contributions to discussions, completing all assignments and cultivating an openness to ideas—both your own and those of others. I expect students to treat each other (and me) with respect, which includes no private talking or whispering during class, so everyone may hear the person who is speaking to the group. This respect includes all the time to the end of the period—that is, please do not begin to pack up your things before the class period ends! Please also note that my definition of a respectful classroom includes no cellphone use, e-mail use or web surfing during class. Such activities in class will get you an invitation to leave."

"A main goal of anthropology is to encourage you to think critically and well about any cultural phenomenon you look at. That means that there often aren’t clear-cut 'right' and 'wrong' answers to many of the questions we will raise. But there are well-thought and well-communicated responses. You will do a lot of writing as you organize your thoughts this semester, and you will need to express yourself in conversation, too."

"With all that said, I want to encourage you to be creative and have fun with this course. We will work hard and have fun while trying to creatively add our efforts to addressing important contemporary issues that we face as a society."

"What you may expect from me"

"I will come to class prepared; to the best of my abilities I will stay current with the information I present; I will work to be sensitive to the differences among you in your learning needs; I will provide as intellectually stimulating a classroom setting as possible; I will end class on time; I will be fair in assessing your performance in this class. . . ."



Senior Seminar Research Project =
Group Presentation
&
Group Report
(Term Paper)
 
tba
 
Charles Dickens, 1842, Francis Alexander.
Demosthenes
 
Charles Dickens

Senior Seminar Panel Discussions

Justice Alan Page and UMD Students on Panel, 15 November 2012
Justice Alan Page and UMD Students on Panel
15 November 2012
  Photo: Northlands New Center

Class Format

This class is a seminar and will be conducted in that format.  According to the primary definition in Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, a seminar is:

"a group of advanced students studying under a professor with each doing original research and all exchanging results through reports and discussions."

What you get out of the class will largely depend on what you put into it.

Every member of the class will be an active participant and contributor the learning experience of us all, and the class will be as successful as we can make it as a community of scholars.

after Prof. David Syring


Prerequisites . . .

 to top of page / A/Z index Summary of Main Due Dates



You must complete all of the assignments and tasks listed below (except the Extra Credit, which is optional) in order to receive a passing grade in this class.

Failure to complete any part of the class will be grounds for failure.

For a detailed listing of due dates for all exams and assignments and other items please see your Moodle logo. Gradebook

1. Participation in Class Activities
(The total number of points available will depend on new discoveries and announcements that appear during the semester. New topics will be added as appropriate.)
       
   
A.
Class Attendance and Active Participation is Required

FULL participation of each student enrolled in the class is mandatory
   
B.
Forums, Wikis, Feedback, Freelistings, Assessments, and Other Interactive Activities
Do as scheduled in Moodle
see also Netiquette

  *(The total number of points available for the forum postings will depend on new discoveries and announcements that appear during the semester. New topics will be added as appropriate.)
       
2. Panel Discussion
       
   
A.
Panel Participation
   
3. Semester Group Research Project
(for up to 500 points or about* 25% of grade)
       
   
A.
Informal Project Statement/Proposal
(for up to 20 points)
   
B.
Annotated Bibliography & Promissory Abstract
(for up to 20 points)
   
C.
Group Research Project Presentation
(for up to 100 points)
   
C.
Final Group Research Report (Term Paper)
(for up to 400 points)
       
AVISO: Unexcused late assignments receive no credit
4. Exams
(for up to 1040 points)
       
   
A.
Midterm
(for up to 400 points)
      Submission of Questions for Midterm Exam
(for up to 20 points)
   
B.
Final
(for up to 600 points) Week 16 ("Finals Week"): The Senior Seminar Final Exam is scheduled for tba, tba, tba., in Cina 214


REM: Bring your Laptop
Laptop
Firefox
Moodle Exams (and everything else on Moodle) works best with a Firefox browser. If you do not have a Firefox browser on your laptop, download one (it's free).
      Submission of Questions for Final Exam
(for up to 20 points) Wiki questions for the Final exam are due by Monday, tba 11:55 p.m.
       
5. Extra Credit Review
(optionial, for up to 30 points)
       
    A. Extra Credit Lecture/Video Review
       
  *(The total number of points available for the forum postings will depend on new discoveries and announcements that appear during the semester. New topics will be added as appropriate.)
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 Canvas

Main Due Dates for Senior Seminar

For a detailed listing of due dates for all exams and assignments and other items please see your Moodle logo. Gradebook

Week 1
 
Week 2    
Week 3    
Week 4    
Week 5  

s2017 Informal Project Statement, or Project Proposal (up to 20 points)
due by the end of Week 5, Friday, 11 February 2017, 11:55 p.m.

The informal statement can be very straightforward. It's a simple statement of, "Here's what I'm interested in doing. . . . Here's why I'm interested in that. . . . Here's what I think will be useful for that project. . . . What do you think?"

Or, it can be something like "I'm thinking about doing a project on X or Y, but can't make up my mind. Here's what I'm interested in, and why. . . . Here are some things that look like they might be useful for the project. . . . What do you think?"

A more formal statement (Abstract) of what you eventually decide upon isn't due for another two weeks.)


   
Week 6   Wiki questions for the Midterm Exam are due by the end of Week 5, Saturday, 11 February 2017, 11:55 p.m.

   
Week 7   Your Project Promissory Abstract and Annotated Bibliography are due by end of Week 7, Saturday, 25 February 2017, 11:55 p.m.
Week 8    
Week 9    
Week 10    
Week 11    
Weeks 12-15   Group Research Project Presentations
Week 13   s2018 Extra Credit Review Paper
due by the end of Week 13, Saturday, 14 April 2018

AVISO: Late Extra Credit Papers will not be accepted unless (1) arrangements for an alternate date have been arranged in advance, or (2) medical emergencies or similar extraordinary unexpected circumstances make it unfeasible to turn in the assignment by the announced due date. Why?
Week 14    
Week 15   Wiki questions for the Final exam are due by Monday, tba 11:55 p.m.

   
    s2018 Rearch Report (Term Paper) (up to 400 points)
due by the end of Week 15, Friday, 28 April 2018

AVISO: Late Term Papers will not be accepted unless (1) arrangements for an alternate date have been arranged in advance, or (2) medical emergencies or similar extraordinary unexpected circumstances make it unfeasible to turn in the assignment by the announced due date. Why?

   
Week 16   Forum final semester evaluations are due by Saturday, 6 May 2017, 11:55 p.m. CDT

AVISO: Unexcused late assignments receive no credit



AVISO: Unexcused Late Assignments receive no credit
Pleas for exceptions will fall on deaf ears

If you really want to know the details of why that is so, have a look at the memo below that I recently sent to a student. The details change from semester to semester, but the basic scheduling problems remain the same. . . . It's basically a boring read, but important none the same--especially if you're the procrastinating type. -- Tim Roufs




Envelope Image © 2013 - 2018 Timothy G. Roufs
Page URL: http:// www.d.umn.edu /cla/faculty/troufs/anth4653/ssrequirements.html
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