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Anthropology in the News

Canvas

Anthropology
  Senior Seminar


  Spring 2018 Greetings

  Spring 2018 Calendar

Sunday, 21 January 2018, 02:46 (02:46 AM) CST, day 021 of 2018

Mustard seed.



Babel Fish Translation
~ translate this page
OWL (Online Writing Lab) Purdue University.


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 Canvas

Anthropology Senior Seminar
Group Research Presentation
(Group Term Presentation)

Group Term Presentation Rubrics

tba

Demosthenes Practising Oratory (1870)
Jean-Jules-Antoine Lecomte du Nouÿ (1842–1923)

Wikipedia


Is public speaking fear limiting your career? -- Tim Smedley, BBCcapital (22 March 2017)


"Teamwork, plus her experience making presentations in class, proved valuable for an internship this year at fashion designer Kate Spade."

  This is the real reason new graduates can't get hired -- Ronald Alsop , BBC (19 November 2015)


INDEX


What is it?

Your "Class Project" consists of (1) a focused informal Presentation to the class, and (2) a formal written Group Term Report (Term Paper) on what you discovered / learned in your research.

Your Presentation is basicaly a ca. 45 minute report to the class
on your
Group Research Report (Term Paper).

Your Presentation is an informal report of your Group Research Term Paper,
to a different audience (your classmates), and with a different style (informal)
.

Think of your Presentation as a TED talk for your classmates, if you are familiar with TED talks, without having to pay the $3,500-$15,000 fee to give your talk at a TED conference.

(If you are not familiar with TED talks, you should check on them. Have a look at some TED Talks. TED Talks Topics.)

It is an informal oral presentation of your Group Research Project, to a different audience (your classmates), and with a different style (informal) than your written Research Report (which is a formal report to an audience of the members of the Student section of your Professional Organization--like the American Anthropological Association [AAA], or that Central States Anthropological Society [CSAS], or the Society for Applied Anthropology [SfAA]), presented with a different style (informal).

.Keep in mind, as mentioned the first weeks, one of the "Major Characteristics of American Anthropology" is its fourfold approach.

Senior Seminar Research Project =
Group Presentation
&
Group Report (Term Paper)
(on the same topic)
 
tba
 
Charles Dickens, 1842, Francis Alexander.
Demosthenes
 
Charles Dickens
Details of Group Report (Term Paper)


Group Research Project Due Dates
     
Week 5  
s2018 Informal Project Statement, or Project Proposal (up to 20 points)
due by the end of Week 5, Friday, 10 February 2018


 
Week 7   s2018 Your Promissory Group Research Project Abstract and Annotated Bibliography are due by end of Week 7, Saturday, 24 February 2018

 
Week 13   s2018 Your Group Research Presentation materials are due by the day you give your Presentation in class. Group Research Presentations begin Week 13 Day 24, Wednesday, 11 April 2018.

 
Week 15   s2018 Group Rearch Report (Group Term Paper)
due by the end of Week 15, Friday, 28 April 2018

AVISO: Late Term Papers will not be accepted unless (1) arrangements for an alternate date have been arranged in advance, or (2) medical emergencies or similar extraordinary unexpected circumstances make it unfeasible to turn in the assignment by the announced due date. Why?

Basic Presentation Matters
     
Presentations will be in-class, and may include any or none of the following listed below . . .

For an excellent example of "none of the above," have a look at the YouTube Presentation of
Joel Salatin, at the 3rd Annual Community Wellness Day April 28th 2012 at UMD


(Remember Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm from the videos and the text?)


Presentations should include one (or more) of the following . . .

 

  • Tools

    • The use of Prezi is Discouraged

  • Audience ("rhetorical situation")

    • Your overall Project addresses two separate and distinct audiences . . .

    • Your audience for your Presentation is your classmates, (not the prof), presented with a different style (informal) than your written Research Report.

    • Your audience for your written Research Report an audience of the members of a Student section of one of your Professional Organizations--like the American Anthropological Association [AAA], or that Central States Anthropological Society [CSAS], or the Society for Applied Anthropology [SfAA]).



  • Purpose ("rhetorical situation")

    • To let them know what you were working on, and what you found out, and what might be interesting to look at in the future



  • Style

    • for the Presentation, it may be informal

    • for the Paper, formal academic



  • Length of Written Report

    • 12 - 15 well-written pages, including one title page and one Works Cited (or References) page

      • 12-15 pages are including one title page (see sample title page) and

      • and at least one separate "Works Cited" (or "References") page (see sample)

      • that leaves 10-13 pages of text

      • NOTE: Folks who look mostly at web sites and/or sources like Wikipedia sometimes find it difficult to write 8-10 pages of quality text. If you find that you are in that position, try researching the topic in a book focusing on your topic. Many are recommended in the class WebPages.

      • caveat: if you include a number of long quotes, then your paper should be proportionately longer

    • double-spaced

    • with one-inch margins all around

    • with body type font 11 or 12

    • illustrations, tables, figures, diagrams . . . may be included, but must be properly placed and cited

    • Term Paper Details


  • Length of In-Class Presentation

  • Format . . . see . . .

  • Citation Conventions (How to cite your references . . . aka "Footnotes")


  • Using Wikipedia, Desk References, Encyclopedia, Non-peer-reviewed Media, and Similar Sources 

It is fine for you to begin a project by consulting with Wikipedia (and similar on-line sources of encyclopaedic-type information) but you should be aware that the Wikipedia entries are open-source and are not checked and verified in the same manner as other reference materials.

And sometimes the entries are confusing (have a look at "Macedonia," for example).

And Wikipedia, should you use it, should only be a starting point.

Wikipedia



It is also OK to start out your research by consulting reference works such as encyclopedias, dictionaries and lexica, glosaries, other general reference works, and the like, but this stage should only be a preliminary preparation for more focused and in-depth research work.

For a college research paper you should also have a look at other references, either traditional materials from the library, or on-line materials from sources like UMD E-Journal Locator, JSTOR, etc., or books and manuscripts On-Line. That is to say Wikipedia and the other reference-type sources listed should not be your only source of information. And you must add your own evaluations, comparisons, development, criticisms, critiques, and the like to any reference materials used. Simply cutting and pasting information from sources is not sufficient to satisfy the requirements of either a required or extra-credit research paper.

Your paper should reflect a synthesis and evaluation of materials researched.


Helpful Information
     
  • Where do I Begin?

    • Your textbooks and class materials are most often the best place to start.

see theOWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.for . .

Where do I begin?

Sources

Searching the World Wide Web: Overview

The Internet and Search Engines


Search Engines and Directories

Searching with a Search Engine

Searching with a Web Directory

Search Engines

Search the Invisible Web

Other Useful Sites

Other Search Strategies

Internet References


Doing Research and Drafting Your Paper

 

  • Selecting a Topic

    Your Group Research Project"consists of a focused group report (term paper) and a presentation on what you discovered / learned while working on the paper. It is recommended that you do your term paper and your class research presentation on the same subject.

    As mentioned the first week, one of the "Major Characteristics of American Anthropology" is its fourfold approach.

    For your Class Project select a topic in which you are interested.

  • Please feel free also to stop by Cina 215 if you are in the neighborhood, or to email troufs@d.umn.edu with your questions and/or observations.

    Focus on that first, and keep in mind that at the end of the semester you will need to do a presentation on your research.


  • Informal Proposal

see Choosing a Topic OWL logo, Online Writing Lab at Purdue.

This particular proposal statement is intended just to get you started thinking about and working on your Project

Your next statement will be formal,
it will be a Promissory Abstract

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

This proposal can be fairly simple, and informal, including . . .

  • a basic informal statement of one or more topics that you are interested in writing about . . .

  • there is no minimum length, but most people submit two or three paragraphs

    • one paragraph should include including basic information the topic itself

    • one paragraph should include information about why you are interested in the topic(s)

    • and a third paragraph, or section, of your informal proposal should include three or four sources (or more), and statements about why you think those sources might be helpful in researching the topic(s)

  • It may be more elaborate if you wish. But this proposal may also be simple and informal

  • do try to work an analytical section into your final paper that reflects the four-fold nature of anthropology


  • Audience: Classmates


  • Purpose: To get started thinking about . . .

    • the subject you might want to look at for your Term Project

    • how you might want to go about doing that

    • what sources you might use


  • Style:

    • for the Proposal Statement, informal

    • for the Promissory Abstract and the Term Paper itself, academic


  • Format: This proposal statement can be in informal format, but if you use a formal format, use any standard format and citation convention (APA, MLA, Turabian-Chicago . . . ). Don't make up one of your own. and citation convention (APA, MLA, Turabian-Chicago . . . )
    • doublespaced

    • with one-inch margins all around

    • with body type font 11 or 12

    • illustrations, tables, figures, diagrams . . . may be included, but must be properly placed and cited




  • Formal Promissory Abstract

    from Maxine C. Hairston1

    "Abstracts"

     
    The Uses of Abstracts 

     Writing the Abstract

  • Promissory Abstracts
  • Summary Abstracts
  • fromOWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.

    The Purdue Online Writing Lab

    <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/>

     Writing Report Abstracts

    <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/656/01/>

    Abstracts and Executive Summaries

    <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/726/07/>

    Journal Abstracts

    <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/752/04/>



    s2018 Your Promissory Group Research Project Abstract and Annotated Bibliography are due by end of Week 7, Saturday, 24 February 2018

      • each team should compile and submit a single copy of an initial Annotated Bibliography of sources related to its chose project

      • each team member should contribute one or more print sources (journal article or book or chapter of book), and one or more web sources (web sites or electronic documents accessible via the web)

      • each entry should be annotated to include a summary of the kinds of information the source contains, and how it might be useful for your research this semester (see details below)

      • for information on Promissory Abstracts see Maxine Hairston and OWL below. . .


      • 12 - 15 well-written pages, including one title page and one Works Cited (or References) page

        • 12-15 pages are including one title page (see sample title page) and

        • and at least one separate "Works Cited" (or "References") page (see sample)

        • that leaves 10-13 pages of text

        • NOTE: Folks who look mostly at web sites and/or sources like Wikipedia sometimes find it difficult to write 8-10 pages of quality text. If you find that you are in that position, try researching the topic in a book focusing on your topic. Many are recommended in the class WebPages.

        • caveat: if you include a number of long quotes, then your paper should be proportionately longer

      • double-spaced

      • with one-inch margins all around

      • with body type font 11 or 12

      • illustrations, tables, figures, diagrams . . . may be included, but must be properly placed and cited

      • Term Paper Details


        • Should I Include an Abstract in My Final Paper--and is this the One to Include?

          • It is not necessary to include an "Abstract" in your final paper, although you may if you would like.


      • Presentation Details



      • Working Bibliography ("List of References")

        • The "working bibliography" for your project is a simple list of references—sources that you think will be helpful to in putting together your paper and your presentation.

        • At the start of your project it is probably a good idea to have 6-10 sources that "look pretty good" and as if they might be useful to your project.

        • At the beginning, and for the list you turn in during Week 6, you do not have to do anything more than list the resources that you think will be helpful to your project and that you expect to use for your paper and/or your report.

        • Once you begin looking at these materials, you may want to start annotating them—that is, beginning to make notes about how they might actually be used in your paper and/or presentation.

        • And you might start noting additional references from your original list of items.

        • For details on evaluating the items on your initial "working bibliogaphy",
          and on the process of annotating your working bibliography (your simple list),
          see the resources available from . . .


        • And your sources may include any or all of the following kind of items . . .

          • For your paper you should also use traditional library materials, and, where appropriate, interviews and videotapes.

          • traditional library printed materials (books, journals, magazines, government reports, microformat materials . . .)

          • library AV materials (videos, films, DVDs, audio recordings . . .)

          • library and on-online special collections (maps, images, oral history materials . . .)

          • materials from special conferences and events (for e.g., The Nobel Making Food Good Conference Archives . . .)

          • materials from cultural myths and legends . . .

          • personal interviews (including relevant YouTube materials . . .)

          • questionnaires

          • personal journals and diaries . . .

          • personal interviews (you might even want to do something creative, like interview yourself . . .)

          • relevant WebSite materials

        • For more information on Annotated Bibliographies see OWL below. . .

        • see theOWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.for . .

          The Purdue Online Writing Lab
          <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/>

          Evaluating Bibliographic Citations

          Annotated Bibliographies

            Annotated Bibliography Example


            Annotated Bibliography Samples



  •      
    • Other Useful Writing and Presenting Resources

    Whenever you write or present anything you should consider . . .

    audience

    purpose

    your personal style
      • For your presentation, your audience should, obviously, be your classmates

        • do not write or present to your college professor(s) as audience

        And basically, your presentation should . . .

            • have a beginnng, a middle and an end

            • be organized

            • if appropriate, be illustrated

    Suggested Strategies for Organizing your Papers and Presentations:

         
      (descriptive)
      (descriptive)
      (descriptive)
      (descriptive)
         
      (analytic)
      (analytic)
     


    And you can do this for more than one subtopic


    • Time Sequence

      T1 ---> T2 ---> T3 ---> T4 ---> . . .


    • Space Sequence

      S1 ---> S2 ---> S3 ---> S4 ---> . . .


    • N number of items

      "Ten itms define the importance of. . . .

      First, . . . .
      Second, . . . ."
      Third, . . . ."
      Finally, . . . ."

    • Most Important ---> Least Important:

      "The most important X about ... is ..."

      "Next in importantance to X is ..."

      "The least importantant to X is ..."

    • Comparison / Contrast

      Note how things are the same and how they are different. In a logical comparison / contrast would be with / between "X" of Y.

      Women
       
      Men
      Item # 1
      similar
      different
       
      similar
      different
      Item # 2
      similar
      different
       
      similar
      different
      Item # 3
      similar
      different
       
      similar
      different
      Item # 4
      similar
      different
       
      similar
      different
      Item # N
      similar
      different
       
      similar
      different

       

    • Emic / Etic

     

    Required Section(s):

    After you have described what you have read or seen you must include in your paper / presentation one or more detailed paragraphs indicating your own personal response to and evaluation of the materials (required)

    see the OWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University for specific information

      The Purdue University Online Writing Lab

    fromOWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.

    Argument Papers

    Exploratory Papers

    Types of APA Papers

    APA Sample Papers
    Sample APA Paper: Definitions of Online Communication
    Sample APA Paper: Adolescent Depression

    MLA Sample Papers
    MLA Undergraduate Sample Paper: Andrew Carnegie
    MLA Sample Papers: Nineteenth Century Farming Handbooks




    • UMD Writer's Workshop

     Writers' Workship

    The Writers' Workshop offers free one-to-one writing support to all members of UMD's campus community. Graduate student or faculty consultants will work with you on any writing project at any stage in the writing process.

    For more information or to make an appointment, visit <d.umn.edu/writwork>, or stop by the Workshop's front desk in the Learning Commons on the second floor of the Kathryn A. Martin Library and visit with Jill Jenson and her staff. Walk-ins are welcome if a consultant is available.

    Look for the Workshop’s trademark wall mural covered with quotations about writing. 

    Students in this class have permission to see a Writers’ Workshop consultant for all take-home exams.

    • UMD Assignment Calendar

    for your research papers try the
    UMD Library > Research Tools and Resources >
    Assignment Calculator
    <http://www.d.umn.edu/lib/assign/>


    UMD Library Assignment Calculator

    Paper is due to
    Canvas assigment area


    • Academic Policies

    This course is governed by the . . .

    University of Minnesota Duluth Student Academic Integrity Policy
    <http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/Academic_Integrity_Policy.htm>

    UMD Office of Student and Community Standards
    <http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/>

    "Academic dishonesty tarnishes UMD's reputation and discredits the accomplishments of students. UMD is committed to providing students every possible opportunity to grow in mind and spirit. This pledge can only be redeemed in an environment of trust, honesty, and fairness. As a result, academic dishonesty is regarded as a serious offense by all members of the academic community. In keeping with this ideal, this course will adhere to UMD's Student Academic Integrity Policy, which can be found at [http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/integrity/Academic_Integrity_Policy.htm]. This policy sanctions students engaging in academic dishonesty with penalties up to and including expulsion from the university for repeat offenders." — UMD Educational Policy Committee, Jill Jensen, Chair (08/16/2007)

    and the UMD Student Conduct Code
    <http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/code/>

    and the

    Student Conduct Code Statement (students' rights)
    <http://www.d.umn.edu/conduct/conduct/conduct-statement.html>

    The instructor will enforce and students are expected to follow the University's Student Conduct Code [http://www1.umn.edu/regents/policies/academic/Student_Conduct_Code.html]. Appropriate classroom conduct promotes an environment of academic achievement and integrity. Disruptive classroom behavior that substantially or repeatedly interrupts either the instructor's ability to teach, or student learning, is prohibited. Disruptive behavior includes inappropriate use of technology in the classroom. Examples include ringing cell phones, text-messaging, watching videos, playing computer games, doing email, or surfing the Internet on your computer instead of note-taking or other instructor-sanctioned activities." — UMD Educational Policy Committee, Jill Jensen, Chair (08/16/2007)

    Instructor and Student Responsibilities Policy

    AVISO!

    A Note on Extra Credit Papers

    Failure to comply with the above codes and standards when submitting an Extra Credit paper will result in a penalty commensurate with the lapse, up to and including an F final grade for the course, and, at a minimum, a reduction in total points no fewer than the points available for the Extra Credit project. The penalty will not simply be a zero for the project, and the incident will be reported to the UMD Academic Integrity Officer in the Office of Student and Community Standards.

     

    A Note on "Cutting and Pasting" without the Use of Quotation Marks
    (EVEN IF you have a citation to the source somewhere in your paper)

    If you use others' words and/or works you MUST so indicate that with the use of quotation marks. Failure to use quotation marks to indicate that the materials are not of your authorship constitutes plagiarism—even if you have a citation to the source elsewhere in your paper/work.

    Patterned failure to so indicate that the materials are not of your own authorship will result in an F grade for the course.

    Other instances of improper attribution will result in a 0 (zero) for the assignment (or a reduction in points equal to the value of an Extra Credit paper), and a reduction of one grade in the final grade of the course.

    All incidents will be reported to the UMD Academic Integrity Officer in the Office of Student and Community Standards as is required by University Policy.


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