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Advanced Writing: Social Sciences

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Week 05: Research / Writing:
Professional Interviews

Assignments for the Week
 

Day 09 -- Tuesday 19 February 2002
WORDS OF THE DAY: REVISE and PROSE


Old Business / Announcements:
  • Lab on 14 February dismissed early due to electrical problem. We will review that session next Thursday in the lab.

TOPICS FOR DAY:

  1. Reports on interviews?

  2. Review: Handout: Samuel T. Williamson (1949), "How to Write Like a Social Scientist"

  3. Videotape: Revising Prose by Richard A. Lanham (28 min., " video, UMD No. VC 301). This tape follows: Lanham, R. A. (1992). Revising Prose (3rd ed.). New York: Macmillan.

     
    Lanham's "Paramedic Method" Includes the following steps:
    1. Circle the prepositions.
    2. Circle the "is" forms.
    3. Ask "Who is kicking who?"
    4. Put this "kicking" action in a simple (not compound) active verb.
    5. Start fast--no mindless introductions.
    6. Write out each sentence on a blank sheet of paper and mark off its basic rhythmic units.
    7. Mark off sentence lengths.
    8. Read the passage aloud with emphasis and feeling.

    "But how will I ever have enough time to do that?"

    "But if I do that, how am I ever going to get six pages?"

    "But . . . but. . . ."

  4. Revising slides

  5. PROBLEM REVIEW: How to organize and present your interview materials

  6. Review Handbook assignments (time permitting)
    • Ch. 06 "Constructing Paragraphs"
      • Overview of Chapter
      • Editing Tips: "Editing the paragraphs in your writing" (p. 103)
      • Useful Lists and Guidelines: "Commonly used transitions" (pp. 114-115)

  7. In-class work reading and commenting on drafts (time permitting)
    • Rewrite.
    • Discuss your works, examining the quality of their descriptions and the quality of the analysis used.
    • Check thesis or theme.


Day 10 -- Thursday 21 February 2002
WORD OF THE DAY: From Merriam-Webster
(archive)


Old Business / Announcements:
  • Lab on 14 February dismissed early due to electrical problem. Review Day 08

  • Review Handbook assignments (time permitting)
    • Ch. 06 "Constructing Paragraphs"
      • Overview of Chapter
      • Editing Tips: "Editing the paragraphs in your writing" (p. 103)
      • Useful Lists and Guidelines: "Commonly used transitions" (pp. 114-115)

 

TOPICS FOR DAY:
  1. Lab Assignment:

    You feel the need for a little extra (or a little?) spending money so you decide to make a some quick cash by writing a feature article for the Statesman. The Editor wants you to do a piece on academic language on college campuses for the week after next. What luck! That's just what you're working on in Comp.

    So you set off to do some research and interviewing. Naturally, as you prepare for doing your freewrite you will want to take good notes, properly quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing your material in a useful manner. And, naturally, you will want to properly keep track of your bibliography items, even if it is for the Statesman.

    So you work out your project schedule following §40b "Scheduling a research project" (p. 439 text), and you anticipate doing (1) some library research, (2) surfing the web, (3) interviewing three faculty members and, (4) interviewing at least a half dozen students who frequent the Espresso Express coffee bar. At least one of the professors needs to be one of those kind that uses big words, so you scratch down "check with philosophy prof."

    Samuel T. Williamson's "How to Write Like a Social Scientist" seems like a good place to start, so your task for today is to take good notes, properly quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing from "How to Write like a Social Scientist." Follow the suggestions for quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing below. In your project for today you must have (1) a section of quotes, (2) a section of paraphrases, (3) a summary section, and (4) a bibliography reference, all from "How to Write. . . ."

    When you are through e-mail the results to troufs@d.umn.edu.

    At the end of the session today we'll have a look at what your finished interview project should look like.

  2. Review Handbook assignments
    • Ch. 42 "Using Sources: Useful Lists and Guidelines"
      • "Tips on keeping a working bibliography" (pp. 477-478 text)
      • "Deciding whether to quote, paraphrase, or summarize" (pp. 485-486 text)
      • "Tips on taking notes" (pp. 484-485 text)
      • "Tips on quoting accurately" (p. 487 text)
      • "Tips on paraphrasing accurately" (p. 491 text)
      • "Tips on summarizing accurately" (p. 492 text)
      • "Tips on acknowledging sources" (p. 497 text)

    • Ch. 43 "Writing a Research Essay"
      • Overview of Chapter
      • Useful Lists and Guidelines: "A list of signal verbs" (pp. 508-509)

    • Review of Ch. 4, "Revising and Editing: Useful Lists and Guidelines"
      • Editing Tips: "Editing the paragraphs in your writing"
      • Useful Lists and Guidelines: "Reviwing a Draft" (pp. 52 - 53)
      • "An editing inventory" (p. 65 in text)
        • Continue making your own personal inventory

  1. Reports on interviews?

  2. PROBLEM: How to organize and present your interview materials?

  3. In-class working on drafts. Rewrite. Discuss your works, examining the quality of their descriptions and the quality of the analysis used.

  4. Prepare bibliography and note cards on your interview. Make (1) a bibliography card, and (2) several note cards on 4 x 6 or 3 x 5 cards [or recycled paper of the same size].
    • See The New St. Martin's Handbook, §42a.1 for information on and samples of bibliography cards.
    • On the note cards briefly summarize / paraphrase topics (100 to 150 words). Do this as if you were taking notes for a 5000-level term paper. On your note cards you should also include your personal reaction / evaluation as a separate section on each card. See §42c. for examples of note cards, and information on how to prepare the note cards.
    • You do not have to hand these cards in, but the information on your bibliography card should be included in the bibliography section of your paper.

Next Week


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