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Week 09: Comparison / Contrast Informative Writing

Assignments for the Week
 

Day 17 -- Tuesday 26 March 2002
WORD OF THE DAY:
PREPOSTEROUS


TOPICS FOR DAY:
  1. Due Friday: Project #3 Comparison / Contrast Informative Article

    • For this case study be sure to give a brief description of your audience, if it is a specialized audience not generally known

    • See note on "Handing in Materials"

      • Prepare papers to hand in, as before. In addition:

        • In one sentence at the top of page one, write what you think are the best features of your article.
        • In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with this article.
        • Explain in writing why paper three is well written for the audience. Select a passage that illustrates how well written it is and discuss it. Length: 100-250 words (one page).

  2. Sign up for Class Presentation of Project #4 Analytical Speech:
    • Day 25--23 April, Day 27--30 April, Day 28--02 May--in Cina 214, Day 29--07 May
    • Written version of presentations due Friday, 19 April 2002

  3. The Twenty Most Common Errors

    Lunsford and Connors have identified "The Twenty Most Common Errors" (other than spelling) among U.S. college students.

    These are very much like Part IV of the Final Exam

    1. missing comma after an introductory element
    2. vague pronoun reference
    3. missing comma in a compound sentence
    4. wrong word
    5. missing comma(s) with a nonrestrictive element
    6. wrong or missing verb ending
    7. wrong or missing preposition
    8. comma splice
    9. missing or misplaced possessive apostrophe

    10. unnecessary shift in tense

  4. Preview of Project #4 Analytical Speech

  5. Useful Lists

  6. Writing Practice (time permitting)

 

Day 18 -- Thursday 28 March 2002
WORD OF THE DAY:
RECURSIVE

TOPICS FOR DAY:

  1. Due tomorrow: Your Comparison / Contrast Informative Article
    • For this case study be sure to give a brief description of your audience, if it is a specialized audience not generally known

    • See note on "Handing in Materials"

      • Prepare papers to hand in, as before. In addition:

        • In one sentence at the top of page one, write what you think are the best features of your article.
        • In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with this article.
        • Explain in writing why paper three is well written for the audience. Select a passage that illustrates how well written it is and discuss it. Length: 100-250 words (one page).

  2. If you have not already done so, sign up for Class Presentation of Project #4 Analytical Speech:
    • Day 25--23 April, Day 27--30 April, Day 28--02 May--in Cina 214, Day 29--07 May
    • Written version of presentations due Friday, 19 April 2002

  3. Writing Practice

    1. Read someone else's Comparison / Contrast Informative Article. Have them read yours.
      • What else would you like to know about the topic?
      • Would you continue to read on after the second sentence if you didn't have to? If not, why not?
      • What is the best part of this piece?
      • Which part needs the most improvement?
      • Discuss your works, examining the overall quality of their presentation.

    2. In-class rewriting and revising of newsletter article.(P#5).
      • check thesis
      • work on revising sentences
      • check wordiness and overuse of "to be" verbs
      • revise/edit proposal / essay (P#5), incorporating the suggestions received in class

      • Prepare papers to hand in, as before. In addition:

        • In one sentence at the top of page one, write what you think are the best features of your article.
        • In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with this article.
        • Explain in writing why paper three is well written for the audience. Select a passage that illustrates how well written it is and discuss it. Length: 100-250 words (one page).

  4. Demonstration: Saving your newsletter article as a WebPage. View the following on Netscape:

    • newsletter_ALC.html
      • this is what a newsletter article looks like if you just took a Word file and did a "Save as a Web Page" using Microsoft Word

    • newsletter_ALC_cleaned.html
      • this is the same article cleaned up using DreamWeaver's Commands>Cean Up Word HTML
      • DreamWeaver made 200 changes in its Word HTML cleaning process

Next Week


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