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Week 15: Argumentative Proposal or Essay

Assignments for the Week
 

Day 29 -- Tuesday 07 May 2002
WORD OF THE DAY: ABSTRACT



Old Business / Announcements:
  • Analytical Presentations, Session #4

  • Liberal Education Program Assessment Survey

  • Time Permitting, Review of:
    • "Abstracts," M. C. Hairston, Successful Writing, 2nd ed.. New York: W.W. Norton, 1986, pp. 223 - 227.

TOPICS FOR DAY:

Analytical Presentations, Session #4: Week 13 -- Day 29, Tuesday, 07 May 2002

Time
Presentor
Topic
09:30 - 09:40
Laura TBA
09:40 - 09:50
Tim TBA
09:50 - 10:00
Adenike TBA
10:00 - 10:10
Kari TBA

 

  1. Work on the paragraphs defining your problem for project #5. You should already have finished your freewriting.

    • Answer the question, "Exactly what is the problem?" ( #1)

    • Work on the paragraph explaining who the problem affects. ( #2)

    • Write one paragraph explaining why the problem needs a solution now. Why can't it wait? ( #3)

    • Write a list of solutions/resolutions that are possible for your problem. List as best you can the reasons for and the objections to each. Use two columns. List pros in one column, cons in the other. ( #4)

      • Include in your revision two opposing positions or pieces of evidence that can be used against your argument.

    • Work on the paragraph outlining who can do something about the problem? Who grants money? Who provides other resources? What do they need to know? Specifically who is the person who, or what is the committee or organization which, you think can help solve the problem? Make a note of that. [This is just another audience definition problem.] ( #5)

 

  1. Discussion of abstracts, and abstract for proposal / essay (P#5): "Abstracts," M. C. Hairston, Successful Writing, 2nd ed.. New York: W.W. Norton, 1986, pp. 223 - 227.


Day 30 -- Thursday 09 May 2002
WORD OF THE DAY: FINAL



  • Course evaluation: Course Call # 47045         QTR 5          Year 02

  • Discussion of final exam
    (4% of the final grade for each of the 5 parts + 2% Extra Credit = 20% or 22% total)

    The final exam may be done either with pencil/pen or with a word processor. The choice is yours. If you choose to do all or part of the final on a word processor you must print out your work.

    1. Write a Short Speech (as Project #04)
      • 5 minute speech, which is about 600 words, or the equivalent of about two and a half typed-in-pica pages (with 1" margins)
      • the topic will be provided

    2. Write a Short Essay for a Soc Club or Crim Club or Anth Club Newsletter (as Project #03)
      • you will need to decide which newsletter
      • 500 words, or the equivalent of two typed-in-pica pages (with 1" margins)
      • the topic will be provided

    3. Sentence Combining Exercise (as "The Crimson Tide" exercise in class)

    4. Mechanics / Processes Section (as the in-class 21 sentences exercise)
      • but there will only be 16 items on the exam

    5. Revising Exercise (as in "American Indians: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow" in class)

    6. Optional Vocabulary Exercise (from the daily vocabulary feature on the web)

  • APA Bibliographic Format   (PowerPoint)

  • Time permitting:
    • Discussion of "The Essential Hangout" and "The Third Place"
      • Hand in cards for Oldenburg and Brissette
      • Discussion of two questions on the Brissett-Oldenburg articles: (1) one question on writing and writing techniques, and (2) one question on substance.

  • Peer review and discussion of proposal / essay (P#5).

TOPICS FOR DAY:

  1. Course evaluation

  2. Discussion of final exam
    (4% of the final grade for each of the 5 parts + 2% Extra Credit = 20% or 22% total)

    The final exam may be done either with pencil/pen or with a word processor. The choice is yours. If you choose to do all or part of the final on a word processor you must print out your work.

    1. Write a Short Speech (as Project #04)
      • 5 minute speech, which is about 600 words, or the equivalent of about two and a half typed-in-pica pages (with 1" margins)
      • the topic will be provided

    2. Write a Short Essay for a Soc Club or Crim Club or Anth Club Newsletter (as Project #03)
      • you will need to decide which newsletter
      • 500 words, or the equivalent of two typed-in-pica pages (with 1" margins)
      • the topic will be provided

    1. Sentence Combining Exercise (as "The Crimson Tide" exercise in class)

    2. Mechanics / Processes Section (as the in-class 21 sentences exercise)
      • but there will only be 16 items on the exam

    3. Revising Exercise (as in "American Indians: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow" in class)

    1. Optional Vocabulary Exercise (from the daily vocabulary feature on the web)

  3. Peer review and discussion of proposal / essay (P#5).
    • Check thesis, evidence, style and punctuation
    • In one sentence at the top of page one, describe the best feature of your paper and article ("That they are done," is not enough.)
    • In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with them
    • Check thesis, sources, audience, logic, mechanics, spelling and style. In-class revising

  1. Review Handbook assignments

  2. Practice exercise(s) for final exam (time permitting)

  3. Due tomorrow: Your Argumentative Proposal or Essay. Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period.

    • See note on "Handing in Materials."
    • Include a proper reference section (bibliography); use APA conventions
    • Prepare a simple list of what makes your argument(s) effective. Attach that list to the end of your paper.

 

Next Week


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