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OWL logo, Online Writing Lab, Purdue University.

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Week 12: Analytical Speech

Assignments for the Week
 

Day 23 -- Tuesday 16 April 2002
WORD OF THE DAY: From Merriam-Webster
(archive)



Old Business / Announcements:

Writing for the Web -- GDNet

TOPICS FOR DAY:

  1. Discussion of "The Essential Hangout" and "The Third Place"
    • Hand in cards for Oldenburg and Brissette
    • Discussion of two questions on the Brissett-Oldenburg articles: (1) one question on writing and writing techniques, and (2) one question on substance.

  2. Think about selecting a topic for your argumentative proposal / essay for Paper #5.
    • Start your library work for Paper #5 as soon as possible
    • Order whatever MINITEX materials you may need.
  1. Paper #5: Your final enterprise is an argumentative proposal or argumentative essay on a problem which you might encounter as an informed citizen of this region. Your argumentative proposal / essay, should be a written analysis that argues to an audience aware of the problem, but unaware of its complexities.
    • Discussion of writing assignment for proposal / essay, Paper #5: Argumentative proposal or essay written to, for example, a county or local board, or to a club or other voluntary association, or to a funding agency.
    • Select a topic for your argumentative proposal / essay for Paper #5.
    • Start your library work for Paper #5 as soon as possible
    • Order whatever MINITEX materials you may need
  2. Review of other conventions and stylistic choices, as appropriate.



 


Day 24 -- Thursday 18 April 2002
WORD OF THE DAY:
From Merriam-Webster
(archive)



Old Business / Announcements:

Writing for the Web -- GDNet

  • Due Tomorrow: Your Analytical Speech
    • Don't forget to write a press release and to note the other notes you need to add this time

  • Note that the place of the final exam has been changed to the Kirby Plaza Lab

  • 2002.04.17 speech of Tim Roufs
    • Audience: Soc-Anth Faculty and Staff
    • Purpose: To inform audience about year's activities
    • Time Allotted: Unknown, to be determined as event unfolded, but probably 10- 20 minutes
    • Visual aids: "Soc-Anth Presentations"

  • PowerPoint Demonstrations (Handbook, 52b)
    • Using PowerPoint

      • OWL PowerPoint Presentations -- Purdue University

        Open up Netscape (everyone should be working in Netscape today). Load up and watch the following Purdue University OWL PowerPoint presentation:

        Organizing Your Argument
        [REM: Project #5 is an Argumentative Proposal or Essay]

        This presentation reviews the elements of an organized essay, including the introduction, the thesis, body paragraphs, topic sentences, counterarguments, and the conclusion. The twenty-one slides presented here are designed to aid the facilitator in an interactive presentation about constructing a well-organized argument. This presentation is ideal for the introduction of argument to a composition course, the beginning of a research unit, or the assignment of a written argument. (Writer and Designer: Jennifer Liethen Kunka)

      • Lecture Slides Set: Anishinabe Curing -- Tim Roufs

 

Paper #4

  1. Write a press release for your "Coffee and Conversation" piece.
    1. Include information on when (including day and time) and where (including address and room numbers) it will be held
    2. who to contact for further information
    3. intended audience
      1. is "everyone welcome," for example?
    4. cost, and sponsoring agency (if any)
    5. do this on a separate sheet (like it was a notice that you would hand out or hang on a wall)

  2. Make a revised/edited outline for Paper #4. See The New St. New Martin's Handbook, Sections 3e., 4e., 43b.

  3. Indicate your audience at the top of the outline. See The New St. New Martin's Handbook, Section 2h

  4. In one sentence at the top of page one write what you think is is the best feature of your talk.

  5. In one sentence at the top of page one write what you think is your main problem with this paper.

  6. Peer review and discussion of Paper #4. Generate a list of what makes for an effective analysis. Generate a list of what makes for a good speech. In-class revising of speech.

  • Revise/edit Paper #4. Complete next-to-final draft of this, and get it ready to hand in.
    • Delete what is repetitive or verbiage from the earlier draft.
    • Add examples, statistics, comparisons to illustrate your point.
    • Get some urgency into your paper.

     

 

TOPICS FOR DAY:

  1. Due tomorrow: Your Analytical Speech

    Don't forget to write a press release and to note the other notes you need to add this time:


    • Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. See information above note on "Handing in Materials."

      • Indicate audience and thesis statement at the top of the first page.
      • In one sentence at the top of page one write what you think is the best feature of your article. In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with your article.
      • What makes your writing effective? Make a list. Attach that list to the end of your paper

    • When you get your paper back keep track of revisions and suggestions for revision to help you improve your writing.


  2. PowerPoint Demonstrations (Handbook, 52b)
    • Using PowerPoint

      • OWL PowerPoint Presentations > Presentations with Annotations > Organizing Your Argument -- Purdue University

        Load up and watch the following Purdue University OWL PowerPoint presentation:

        Organizing Your Argument
        [REM: Project #5 is an Argumentative Proposal or Essay]

        This presentation reviews the elements of an organized essay, including the introduction, the thesis, body paragraphs, topic sentences, counterarguments, and the conclusion. The twenty-one slides presented here are designed to aid the facilitator in an interactive presentation about constructing a well-organized argument. This presentation is ideal for the introduction of argument to a composition course, the beginning of a research unit, or the assignment of a written argument. (Writer and Designer: Jennifer Liethen Kunka)

      • Lecture Slides Set: Anishinabe Curing -- Tim Roufs
  3.  

  4. "The Crimson Tide" sentence combining practice exercise for the final exam

  5. In-class revising of "Coffee and Conversation" talk (P#4)

 

    • Check "big" items: outline, logic . . .
    • Check "midrange" items: paragraphs, transitions . . .
    • Check "small" items: wordiness, mechanics, spelling . . .

  1. Write a press release for your "Coffee and Conversation" presentation (P#4). Include this with your paper.

  2. Continue research, reading, note taking, and freewriting for proposal / essay (P#5).

  3. Read something pertaining to your topic and add two sentences or a paragraph relating to what you have read. Identify this addition on your drafts. Identify this by writing on your drafts something like, "this is the new material that I added for Day 15." At a minimum, read one new source for your proposal / essay project (Paper #5).

  4. Make bibliography cards and note cards for your own use.

Next Week


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