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Class Schedule

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Week: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15
Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |

  • Assignments are listed at the end of each daily entry.

    [NOTE: Click on anything that is underlined for further information.]

     

  • You should usually read the assignments prior to consideration of their related topics in class. If you have read the text prior to presentation of the visual materials in class you will more easily keep track of what is going on.

  • Except for most of the video materials, actual presentation will likely vary from this schedule.

  • If you have any difficulty with either the terms or with any of the various topics, stop by my office and I'll go over the materials with you. However, please do not wait until the day before a project is due, or the day before the the exam.

ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviations in the parentheses following the titles of the Verburg readings characterize the work. (See also Acronym and Abbreviation Server on the Web.)

an = analysis
analogy = analogy
argum/pers = argument and
persuasion
c/effect = cause and effect
class/div = classification and
division (observation reporting)
comp/contr = comparison and
contrast
def = definition
descr = description

div/an = division/analysis
eg/ill = example and illustration
expo = exposition
fict = fiction
int = interview
iron/hum/sat = irony, humor and satire
journal = journals
narr = narration (personal)
narr/observ = narration
proc an = process analysis




Class Schedule

Day Date Class Topics and Assignments
Week 01
Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
(01) Tues.

01 Dec.

1998


WORD FOR DAY (01): PREPOSTEROUS

TOPICS OF THE DAY:

  1. Student Information Survey
  2. Registration check
  3. Writing exercise (audience = self; purpose = diary entry):
    • Why am I in this class?
    • What do I hope to gain from it?
  4. Introduction and overview, including an overview of Web syllabus


ASSIGNMENTS:


The letters in the assignment codes [(R01A) (H01A) (WR01A) (Web01A) (P#1) . . . ] represent the 1st assignments for the following areas:

R = Readings from Verburg
H = Handbook Assignments
W = WRiting Assignments
Web = WorldWide WebAssignments
P = Writing Projects


  • WORLDWIDE WEB:

  • (Web01A) Read "FAQ: Writing Online," pp. 2-3 in The New St. Martin's Handbook, and check out the St. Martin's "The Writing Process" WebPage that goes with Part 1 of The Handbook

    Then check out the four online sites listed in the margins of pp. 2-3 [You can also check them out on the class "Writing Labs" Web Page at http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/writing.html#General_Reference]

  • (Web01B) Log on to the course WorldWide Web HomePage and look over the remainder of this Class Schedule. Its URL (Web Address) is:

    http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/ comp3160/cmpreads.html

    http://www.d.umn.edu/~troufs/ will also get you to the course page (that's the UMD home URL plus ~troufs)

  • (Web01C) First read Verburg pp. 1-8, "Part One: Identifying Ourselves" (R01A). Then go to the COMPforum discussion board and click on the "Welcome - Tim Roufs." Then post a followup message to the "Welcome" using the "[ POST FOLLOWUP ]" button above the message. Tell us something about yourself as a person; i.e., identify yourself.

  • (Web01D) Also checkout A Directory of Web Sites for Writers for The New St. Martin's Handbook

  • ESSAY READING:

    All of the assigned essay readings (R01A, R01B, R01C, R02A. . . .) except Oldenburg and Brissett's (see Day 14) are from the Verburg book of readings:

    (See above for an explanation of abbreviations used with the Verburg readings.)

  • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

    • (H01A) p. 669, "Writing Portfolio," ([1st ed., NA] [2nd ed., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 54])
    • (H01B) Ch. 1, "Writing, Reading, and Research"

  • WRITING:

    • (WR01A) Verburg, "Explorations," #2, p. 8 (Give references to specific texts to support your analysis.)

    • (WR01B) Handbook, Exercise 1.2, p. 11 (Use Baldwin's article [R01C]), above).

  • (02) Thurs.

    03 Dec.

    1998


    WORD FOR DAY (02): RECURSIVE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. Review of course structure, goals, and objectives
    3. Brainstorming: "Prewriting"--Freelisting (Cf., Handbook, pp. 32-33) What makes writing hard?
    4. Brainstorming: "Prewriting"--Freelisting (Cf., Handbook, pp. 32-33) What helps writing get easier?
    5. Video of an unusual social situation with which you are probably unfamiliar. So that you can better focus on "pure" description, we will probably watch the video with the sound off. During the video take notes on what you see.

      Generally speaking, it is a good idea to sit down and expand on your notes and as soon as possible after you have taken them. (If you are working on an interview rather than looking at video -- cf., for e.g., Project #2 -- go somewhere close by immediately after the interview and write up your notes.) Expanding on your notes is especially important if you did not tape the interview, or if you can not see the video a second time. So . . . it would be a good idea if as soon as possible after class as you possibly can, you sit down somewhere and expand on your notes from the video seen today in class.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web02) Answer Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 26 using the "POST FOLLOWUP" option of the COMPforum board. Go to the COMPforum discussion board and click on the "Web Assignment (Web02), Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 26 - Tim Roufs." Then post a followup message using the "[ POST FOLLOWUP ]" button above the message.
      2. The next day respond to someone else's followup posting

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R02A) Amy Tan, "Two Kinds," pp. 28-39, from The Joy Luck Club (class, def, narr)
      2. (R02B) Susan Orlean, "Quinceañera," pp. 40-51 (class, def, descr, int, proc an)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H02A) Ch. 52, "Working with Hypertext and Multimedia"
      2. (H02B) Ch. 2, "Considering Rhetorical Situations"

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR02A) Verburg, "Explorations," see (Web02) above
      2. (WR02B) Handbook, Exercise 2.4, p. 23. ([1st ed., Ex., 2.3, p. 14] [2nd ed., p. 19] [3rd ed., p. 25]) Use writing assignment (P#1A) as your subject
      3. (P#1A) Write up a draft of a descriptive incident report (set of field notes?; "journaling") on the video seen in class. Focus on description. Write this piece as if you were writing a police report on what you observed. Do not evaluate!

      4. Freewrite: Sit down and freewrite for 20 - 30 minutes [yes, I know the Handbook says 10 minutes, but that is for a different type of project]; write without stopping on the video seen in class. Once you begin writing do not stop; do not stop to correct spelling, or to rewrite, or even to talk with your true love. Do not at this point worry about what the final product might look like. Describe an extended portion of the video materials as your memory allows. Establish the context first. Then describe the actions in detail. Fill in details. Make a list of behaviors non-natives might find strange or confusing or that might be interpreted differently. Provide explanation as necessary. Try to develop a sense of simply describing something without interpreting or analyzing it. Bring this freewriting exercise with you to the next class.

        "Take" wide angle shots, normal shots, and close-ups.

        Audience: some UMD students who have not seen the video

        Purpose: description -- pure description

        Aim: to give a detailed enough account of the action that some people who have not seen the video could re-enact the action.

    Week 02
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (03) Tues.

    08 Dec.

    1998


    WORD FOR DAY (03): REVISE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. In-class writing: "What are the problems of studying a 'foreign' culture as a social scientist?"
    2. Film clip on "Two Kinds" from Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club (R02A).
    3. Review of assigned readings, including Amy Tan's "Two Kinds" (R02A)
    4. Peer review of the writing assignment (P#1A) from Day 02. DON'T FORGET TO BRING THIS WITH YOU TO CLASS.
    5. Discussion of observing and describing vs. evaluating
    6. Work on rewriting in-class video incident report (time permitting).
    7. Projects for Weeks 01-02, including Project #1, will be graded P/N only. After that they will received other grades/evaluations. Review "Review of Criteria for Grading College Writing Courses"
    8. Preview of Days 04-06

      AUDIOVISUAL LAB: We encourage you to watch the videotape material again, in the Library. You can view it by checking in with the people at the general circulation desk.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

        (Web03A) Read "FAQ: Grammar Online," p. 136 of the Handbook, then check out Grammar and Style Notes by Jack Lynch
      1. (Web03B) Check out the Sentence Grammar WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R03A) Margaret Atwood, "A View from Canada," pp. 59-64 (comp/contr, descr, iron)
      2. (R03B) Germaine Greer, "One Man's Mutilation Is Another Man's Beautification," pp. 65-75 (class)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H03) Ch. 3, "Exploring, Planning, and Drafting" ([1st ed., Ch. 2])
      2. (H03) Ch. 42, "Using Sources" ([1st ed., Ch. 39] [2nd ed., Ch. 41])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR03A) Verburg, "Explorations", #1, p. 64
      2. (WR03B) Prepare bibliography and note cards on the Greer article (R03B, above). After reading Greer make (1) a bibliography card, and (2) several note cards on 4 x 6 or 3 x 5 cards [or recycled paper of the same size].

        See The New St. Martin's Handbook, §42a.1 ([1st ed., §39b.1] [2nd ed., §41a.1]) for information on and samples of bibliography cards.

        On the note cards briefly summarize/paraphrase one or more selections from (R03B) by Greer (100 to 150 words). Do this as if you were taking notes for a 5000-level term paper. Note how the text presents aspects of a culture, and how Greer assesses or interprets these for persons unfamiliar with the culture. You must also include your personal reaction / evaluation as a separate section on each card. See §42c. ([1st ed., §39c] [2nd ed., §41c] [3rd ed., §42c]) for examples of note cards, and information on how to prepare the note cards.

        Put your name on each card before you hand it in. Write on only one side of each card. Turn these cards in next class meeting.

      3. (P#1B) Rewrite and finish the descriptive incident report on the in-class video to hand in next class period. Label this something like "Part 1: Description of. . . ."
      4. (P#1C) Now, for 20 - 30 minutes try to interpret and analyze what you described in this incident report (interpret the video, not Part 1 of your paper). Keep this material separate from your descriptions. Label this section something like "Part 2: Interpretation/Analysis (Draft #4)."

      • Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. No late writing assignments will be accepted unless you make arrangements in advance. Review "HANDING IN MATERIALS."

      • Start thinking about interview and setting up an appointment.

    (04) Thurs.

    10 Dec.

    1998


    WORD FOR DAY (04): RASHOMON

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Due today or tomorrow: The descriptive incident report on the video seen in class (See note on "HANDING IN MATERIALS.")
    2. Preview of assigned readings and excerpts from Carlos Fuentes (VC 3299 PT. 17)
    3. Discussion of bibliography and note cards. Hand in cards for Greer reading (R03B).
    4. Preview of materials on interview/interviewing from Days 05-08
    5. Brief preview of readings/assignments/tasks for days 04 and 05
    6. NOTE: Day 05 is at the Library
    7. Review of project #1 (P#1), descriptive incident report, with draft section of analysis / evaluation
    8. Review "Review of Criteria for Grading College Writing Courses"
    9. Proofread and edit reports in class. [What's the difference between proofreading/editing and revising?] If your reports still need work, you may turn them in anytime today or tomorrow. Use your dictionary, thesaurus, and The New St. Martin's Handbook. If you need to, ask me or your classmates for help.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web04) Answer Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 117 using the Web "POST FOLLOWUP" option of the COMPforum board.

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R04A) Octavio Paz, "The Art of the Fiesta," pp. 86-92 (descr, expo)
        Who is the audience for this piece?
        What is it's purpose?
      2. (R04B) Carlos Fuentes, "The Two Americas," pp. 100-117 (comp/contr, narr)
        Who is the audience for this piece?
        What is it's purpose?

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H04A) Ch. 4, "Revising and Editing" ([1st ed., Ch. 3]
      2. (H04B) Ch. 51, "Designing Documents" ([1st ed., Ch. 46] [2nd ed., Ch. 49]

    • WRITING:

        (WR04A) Verburg, think about "Connections," #2, p. 92

      1. (WR04B) Verburg, "Explorations," see (Web04)

      2. (P#2) Project #2 requires that you prepare for, conduct, and report on an interview with a social science professional practicing in your field. (Start planning for that project.)

        Arrange interviews; make and record observations.


    Week 03
    END OF THE SECOND WEEK -- LAST DAY TO ADD COURSES, CHANGE GRADING OPTION (EXCEPT IN COURSES LIKE THIS WHICH ARE MANDATORY A-F) AND TO CANCEL A COURSE AND NOT HAVE IT RECORDED ON YOUR TRANSCRIPT.

    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |

    (05) Tues.

    15 Dec.

    1998


    WORD FOR DAY (05): LIBRARY

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. "Orientation to social science research and data gathering at the UMD Library."

      Class will be in Library 214. Meet at the Library entrance at 3:55.

      Nancy Carriar or another professional library staff member will discuss library services and resources. Your attendance at this session is optional, but if you do not already know how to use the MINITEX system, the On-Line Library Catalogue, and UMD's ELECTRONIC RESOURCES (including Indexes, Periodicals, Reference, Government, News, Web Resources, and Other Libraries), you should show up.

      You should know how to search for, find, access, and download full-text and other materials from sources such as JSTOR, Justice Information Center, LEXIS-NEXIS, PsychLit (Psychology Abstracts), Social Work Abstracts, Web of Science (citation indices), Books in Print, Encyclopedia Britanica, Government Info. Resources, Minnesota Colleges (PALS), the Expanded Academic Index, the UM Twin Cities Catalogue, First Search, WorldCat, Disclosure, Medline, CD-News, CD-ROM Notebooks . . . , indexes such as the Social Science Index and the Biography Index, and abstracts such as Psychological Abstracts, the microform (microfiche/microfilm) resources, the periodical holdings list, and resources such as Annual Review of Anthropology, the Social Sciences Citation Index, and handbooks such as the Handbook of Middle American Indians.

      Unless you can use these and other similar information sources you are strongly advised to show up! I will assume that by 17:40 hrs. you know how to use all of these research tools.

    2. READINGS BASED ON INTERVIEWS:

      • Susan Orlean, "Quinceañera," pp. 40-51 (Day 02)
      • Susan Cheever, "The Nanny Dilemma," pp. 155-163 (Day 05)
      • Rigoberta Menchú, "Birth Ceremonies," pp. 176-187 (Day 06)
      • Marjorie Shostak, "Nisa's Marriage," pp. 431-437 (Day 11)


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web05) Read "FAQ: Sentence Conventions Online," p. 212, and look again at Grammar and Style Notes by Jack Lynch

        Then check out the Sentence Conventions WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R05A) Louise Erdrich, "Forword," pp. 137-145 (argum/pers, def, expo, narr)
      2. (R05B) Susan Cheever, "The Nanny Dilemma," pp. 155-163 (int)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H05A) Ch. 40, "Becoming a Researcher" ([1st ed., Ch. 37] [2nd ed., Ch. 39])
      2. (H05B) Ch. 41, "Conducting Research" ([1st ed., Ch. 38] [2nd ed., Ch. 40])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR05A) Verburg, think about "Explorations," #3, p. 145
      2. (WR05B) If you have a friend or acquaintance in another section of Comp 3160, you might look at "Appendix B -- Supplementary Unit: An Interview," in Write for the Social Sciences by Eleanor M. Hoffman (Duluth, MN: Department of Composition, University of Minnesota, Duluth, 1995), pp. 139-166. Other materials on interviewing can be obtained at the Northeast Minnesota Historical Center located in Library 325, on the top floor of the Library. Project #2 in this section of Comp 3160 follows these materials closely.

    • (P#2) Schedule / Prepare for / Do Interview

      • Make a list of 3-5 kinds of positions held by people in your field
      • Decide what you want to know about those positions
      • Make a list of people who might be interviewed. Interview a professional who works off campus.
      • Construct a draft of an interview schedule -- i.e., make up a list of relevant questions that you will ask the interviewee. Bring that draft to the next class.

        • Avoid yes/no and fill-in-the-blank questions such as "Do you like to write? Do you write every day . . . ?"

        • Ask open-ended questions that offer room for follow-up and development. Try:

          • "Tell me about . . ."

            "Can you explain . . . ?"

            "Why do you say . . . ?"

            "What advice would you give . . . ?"

            "How would you go about . . . ?"

            "Can you give me an example of . . . ?"

        • Organize your questions and know them well enough so that you do not need to read them off your list.
        • Include some questions about writing on the job.
        • Compose some questions to ask the interviewee about how you, a student, can best prepare for on-the-job writing.
        • Ask the interviewee how s/he prepared for writing on the job.
        • Make a list of things you want to know about the interviewee personally and professionally.
        • At the end ask SES (Socio-Economic-Status) questions.

      • Make arrangements to interview a person in your field. Select an interviewee from off campus. Contact potential interviewees and explain the purpose of the interview. Arrange for an interview time of about an hour. Arrange place, date, and time of interview. If possible, arrange to conduct the interview between class Days 06 and 07. Schedule that NOW!

    (06) Thurs.

    17 Dec.

    1998


    WORD FOR DAY (06): INTERVIEW

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Brief review of video #1
    2. Return papers for Project #1
    3. Review of assigned readings
    4. Video #2, 3-4 excerpts from When the Mountains Tremble (VC 1584), a documentary by Rigoberta Menchú (see readings R06A below)
    5. Brief preview of Paper #3 newsletter or Statesman article
    6. In-class editing of interview schedules
    7. Brief review of interviewing
    8. Practice interviewing


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web06) Answer the [first] two questions of Verburg, "Elaborations," #1, p. 187 using the Web "POST FOLLOWUP" option of the COMPforum board

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R06A) Rigoberta Menchú, "Birth Ceremonies," pp. 176-187 (desc, reg/ill, int, proc an)
      2. (R06B) Frank McCourt, "Limerick Homecoming," pp. 200-209, from Angela's Ashes (narr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H06) Ch. 6, "Constructing Paragraphs" ([1st ed., Ch. 5])

    • WRITING:
      1. Verburg, "Elaborations," see (Web06)
      2. Handbook, Exercise 6.5, p. 115

      3. (P#2) Conduct your interview and write up a draft for next class. Conduct the interview according to your plan.

        • Arrive promptly.
        • Introduce yourself and review the purpose of the interview.
        • Ask for permission to tape the interview. If the interviewer agrees, put the tape recorder off to the side, where you can see it, but where it is not directly between the two of you.
        • As best you can, ask the questions from memory. Don't read them! If you need to refer to the interview schedule occasionally, tell the interviewee something like, "Let me check the questions to make certain that . . ."
        • Listen carefully. Don't interrupt! Keep in mind that you primarily want to hear what the interviewee has to say. Ask follow-up questions: "You mentioned that you . . . Could you tell me more about that . . . ?" (cf., Day 05.)
        • Keep the interview focused on the main issues. If you need to, help the interviewee get back on the main topic if s/he strays too far from the topic. You might try something like:
          • "Before, you mentioned . . ."
          • "You were saying . . ."
          • "Can you tell me more about . . . ?"
        • At the end of the interview ask if you can phone or come back to clear up any questions that occur when you are writing up the interview.
        • At the end of the interview ask the interviewee to sign a release of information form.. Tell interviewee that the final report might be put on file in the Composition Department office at UMD, and/or the Northeast Minnesota Historical Center.
        • Ask for samples of writing done on the job that you might take with you after the interview.
        • Do not forget to thank the interviewee.

      4. As soon as possible after the interview, preferably within thirty minutes of the interview, go somewhere close by to debrief. This is especially important if you did not tape the interview. In writing your post-interview notes, describe all aspects of the interview. Make a list of things that are incomplete or not clear. Call the interviewee to get these things clarified or augmented.
      5. Write a draft of your interview, including relevant items from your debriefing notes.
      6. Begin to prepare an in-depth article on the interview suitable for a training publication in your field, or, if you prefer, begin to write a formal report to your boss. If you are writing your report for a training publication, your audience is someone like you--a person new to the field who is eager to know how to succeed and how skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking will contribute to success in the field. What do you think they need to know?
      7. Your report must be well-thought-out and carefully organized, and the final text must also be free of spelling, grammar, and punctuation and formatting errors. All reports must be word-processed.
      8. What are the most important things the interviewpee said? Rank these.
      9. How are these important things related? Explain.
      10. How will you make these points in your report?
      11. Be sure to clarify when you are interpreting or analyzing rather than simply reportingor describing.
      12. To encourage the audience to read the interview, what information about the interview and the interviewee will you give as an introduction?
      13. How will you end your report?

  • Write a thank you note to the interviewee. Handwrite the note and specifically refer to one or more points of the interview.
  • Bring all of your drafts to the next class.

  • Week 04
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (07) Tues.

    05 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (07): PROSE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Videotape: Revising Prose by Richard A. Lanham (28 min., ½" video, UMD No. VC 301). This tape follows: Lanham, R. A. (1992). Revising Prose (3rd ed.). New York: Macmillan.


      Lanham's "Parametric Method" Includes the following steps:

      1. Circle the prepositions.
      2. Circle the "is" forms.
      3. Ask "Who is kicking who?"
      4. Put this "kicking" action in a simple (not compound) active verb.
      5. Start fast--no mindless introductions.
      6. Write out each sentence on a blank sheet of paper and mark off its basic rhythmic units.
      7. Mark off sentence lengths.
      8. Read the passage aloud with emphasis and feeling.

      "But how will I ever have enough time to do that?"

      "But if I do that, how am I ever going to get six pages?"

      "But . . . but. . . ."

    2. Revising slides

    3. Review of assigned readings (esp. The New St. Martin's Handbook, Ch. 6)

    4. PROBLEM: How to organize and present your interview materials?

    5. In-class work reading and commenting on drafts. Rewrite. Discuss your works, examining the quality of their descriptions and the quality of the analysis used. Check thesis. Put your name on the paper you edit.

    6. Select topics for Paper #3 newsletter/Statesman. Brainstorm a list of issues. Establish them from the point-of-view of various majors/minors and personal interests of people in the class.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web07) Read "FAQ: Sentence Style Online," p. 248 of the Handbook, and have a look at Elements of Style, Strunk and White

        Then check out the Sentence Style WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R07A) Zlata Filipovic´, "Sarajevo Diary," pp. 210-227 (narr)
      2. (R07B) John David Morley, "Acquiring a Japanese Family," pp. 230-240 (comp/contr, iron, narr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H07A) Ch. 7, "Constructing Grammatical Sentences" ([1st ed., Ch. 6])
        Review:
        • Ch. 53 "Understanding Nouns and Noun Phrases" ([1st and 2nd eds., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 55])
      2. (H07B) Ch. 19, "Constructing Effective Sentences" ([1st ed., Ch. 17])
        Review:
        • Ch. 55 "Understanding Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases" ([1st and 2nd eds., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 57])
        • Ch. 56 "Forming Clauses and Sentences" ([1st and 2nd eds., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 58])

    • WRITING:

      1. (P#2) Finish draft of interview report
      2. (P#3) How you could do a story for a newsletter or for the Statesman about your interview, or about some other personal experience, or about the readings from Verburg? Begin drafting your Statesman or newsletter article.
      3. (P#4) How might you develop a speech from your interview, or about the readings from Verburg?

        Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. No late writing assignments will be accepted unless you make arrangements in advance. Review "HANDING IN MATERIALS."

    • OTHER:

      • Schedule conferences as needed


    (08) Thurs.

    07 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (08): TBA

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Due today or tomorrow: The report on your interview (P#2). (See note on "HANDING IN MATERIALS.")
    2. Review of assigned readings
    3. In-class editing of interview reports, including peer review: Lanham, Ch. 1, "Who's Kicking Who?"


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web08) Answer Verburg, "Connections," #3, pp. 286-287 using the Web "POST FOLLOWUP" option of the COMPforum board

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R08A) Kenzaburo Oe, "Japan, the Ambiguous, and Myself," pp. 251-259 (def)
      2. (R08B) Maya Angelou, "Mary," pp. 281-287 (narr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H08) Ch. 43, "Writing a Research Essay" ([1st ed., Ch. 40] [2nd ed., Ch. 42])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR08A) Verburg, "Connections," see (Web08)
      2. (WR08B) Verburg, "Elaborations," TBA

      3. (P#2) Prepare a final draft to hand in. This might be put on file in the Composition Department office.
      4. (P#3)> What is the main idea of your article for a newsletter or the Statesman? Write that down in one sentence. Then freewrite your newsletter piece.


    Week 05
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (09) Tues.

    12 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (09): AUDIENCE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. In-class writing on assigned readings for Day 08 on (W08A) Verburg, "Explorations," TBA omitted W99
    2. Review of assigned readings. Who is the audience?
    3. Discussion of newsletter / Statesman article. Review what audience knows / does not know, and techniques to reach them. Remember, you may not write a letter-to-the-editor type piece, or something like a description of an athletic event.
    4. Brief review of observing, note taking, data sorting, interpreting, outlining (planning), and revising.
    5. Review Handbook Section 3a. In-class "prewriting" about your newsletter / Statesman article for 15-30 minutes. The rhetorical purpose may be of your choosing (i.e., description, analysis, entertainment . . .). (a) Make a list of the things you might refer to in your article. Brainstorm.
    6. In-class "freewriting" of newsletter / Statesman article toward draft of this text, with emphasis on developing a preliminary thesis. Review Handbook Section 3b. What is the relationship of the preliminary thesis to observing, describing, and evaluating?
    7. Discuss ways to present new material.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web09) Read "FAQ: Effective Words Online," p. 286, then check these online sites:

        Then check out the Effective Words WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

        (R09A) Annie Dillard, "Flying," pp. 288-292 (descr)
      1. (R09B) Amitav Ghosh, "The Ghosts of Mrs. Gandhi," pp. 330-343 (argum/pers, narr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

        (H09A) Ch. 54, "Understanding Verbs and Verb Phrases" ([1st and 2nd eds., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 56]) [Review]

      1. (H09B)Ch. 9, "Using Verbs," ([1st ed., Ch. 8])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR09A) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #2, p. 291

      2. (P#3) For Paper #3 newsletter / Statesman article prepare a preliminary bibliography of 3-5 sources (books, articles, films/videotapes, people to interview) which you expect to use for Paper #3. Use correct bibliography format. Follow The New St. Martin's Handbook, Chs. 44-47. ([1st ed., Chs. 38, 39] [2nd ed., Chs. 40, 41] [3rd ed., Chs. 44, 45])

      3. Come to the next regular class prepared to discuss ways and places to find information on the topic and questions.

      4. (P#3) Review Handbook Section 3d-e. Develop an outline or plan for your newsletter / Statesman article. Remember, it is better if the content of this piece is directly related to your major.

        An outline is like a road map in that it lets you see both where you're headed and what progress you're making at getting where you're going with the time and energy at hand. (The difference between an outline and a road map is that when lost with an outline men have occasionally been known to stop and ask for directions.) Remember, a good outline helps you get where you are going more efficiently, it lessens the chances that you will wander off the desired road, and, most importantly, it gives you some sense of where you are at. In the writing process you need to be able to judge your progress. An outline helps you do that. If you can not judge your progress (even if that sometimes is s--l--o--w) you will likely wander about frustrated. A simple outline can prevent that frustration; it also usually improves your writing.

      5. (P#3) Writing from your outline and freewrite materials, finish a "rough draft" of the newsletter / Statesman article. (For this nontechnical audience watch diction and vocabulary choice, and sentence and paragraph lengths; keep organization simple, and do not use many references.) Keep the lay reader interested in what you are describing, analyzing and/or poking fun of. Bring this draft to class.

    • CONFERENCES:

      • Sign up for a conference if you have not already been in to see me. Bring drafts.


    (10) Thurs.

    14 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (10): BIBLIOGRAPHY

    NOTE: Class will meet in H 470.


    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Discussion of assigned readings
    2. Bring in bibliography and your freewriting for Paper #3, newsletter / Statesman article
    3. Group work on analysis, and discussion of bibliographies and developing a thesis from reading and interviewing
    4. Peer review of Paper #3, newsletter / Statesman article

      • Have a peer read your paper and summarize it in one sentence. Do the same for him / her.
      • Compare and discuss your summaries.
      • What ideas might be interesting enough to develop into a longer essay or paper?

    5. In-class work on "rough draft" exercise for newsletter / Statesman article. Do a Lanham-like in-class revising of newsletter / Statesman article, including peer review.
      • Talk about revising, focusing on getting started revising.
      • Talk about organizing an analysis.
      • Talk about organizing an analysis.
      • Be sure to incorporate appropriate observations.
      • Use minimal library references, but include at least one properly referenced citation within the text. (You do not always have to do this when you write an article, but do it for this assignment for the practice of properly referencing in a piece that does not normally use in- text citations -- such as a personal communication or class notes.)

    6. Discussion of common writing problems
    7. Preview of Paper #4, an analytic speech for something like a "Coffee or Conversation" session, or for a "Brown Bag" luncheon. This must be a report written out in full, not just an outline for giving a talk (unless you want to give a public lecture; see "EXTRA CREDIT OPTION FOR THE QUARTER"). For Paper #4 choose your own topic, or write on one of the topics listed below. Review Ch. 43 of The New St. Martin's Handbook ([1st ed., Ch. 40] [2nd ed., Ch. 42]), "Writing a Research Essay."

      • Write on a topic of your own choice (subject to the instructor's approval) after developing your own data base. Your data base must include at least two differing points of view.

        You may work on a paper that you are writing for another class, if it is all right with the instructor of that other class.

        - OR -

      • If you do not have a specific topic in mind, how about trying something on one or more specificaspects one of the following? These are only examples of general topic areas; variations are encouraged.

        • affirmative action
        • ape language
        • culture of poverty
        • flextime/flexible working hours
        • seventeenth century deviance (and witch hunts)
        • social stratification
        • varied theoretical assumptions about human nature
        • Bigfoot
        • alliances (personal or international or community or business or ?
        • economic bartering to avoid taxes, NAFTA, UN in former Jugoslavia, school consolidations, government vouchers for primary and secondary school, or ? . . .)
        • child training practices (enculturation and socialization)
        • conditions before and after contact with outsiders
        • leadership
        • male/female roles in . . .
        • religious similarities/differences between Christianity and another religion or belief system
        • why Jesse Ventura (should/should not) run for President
        • problems with studying a group like the Yanomamö
        • warfare/aggression
        • other specific conflict/conflict-resolution situation (For e.g., should UMD spend more money on women's athletics? Should Miller Hill Mall be allowed to expand? Should we give Jeno any more of the taxpayers' money? Should the taxpayers of Minnesota spend $150 million on a new stadium for the Vikings?
        • Or write about a conflict/conflict-resolution situation involving domestic violence, male/female domestic roles, American Indian spear fishing treaty rights, other American Indian treaty rights, US-Canadian relations, Mexican Chiapas Zapatista revolt/revolution, assassinations, Neo-Nazi "Skinheads" in Germany, Neo-Nazis in America, IRA in Ireland and Great Britain, Chicago drug gangs in Duluth, UN. . . .)


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web10) Finish your basic WebPage

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R10A) Galina Dutkina, "Sovs, Hacks, and Freeloaders," pp. 367-377 (argum/pers, class)
      2. (R10B) Deborah Tannen, "How Male and Female Students Use Language Differently," pp. 412-418 (argum/pers, eg/ill)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H10A) Ch. 20, "Creating Coordinate and Subordinate Structures" ([1st ed., Ch. 18])
      2. (H10B) Then read Tannen's essay (R10b) with an eye to coordination and subordination

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR10A) Verburg, "Explorations," #2, p. 418
      2. (WR10B) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #2, p. 418

      3. (P#3) Continue research, note taking, and working on paper drafts. Always bring these to class.

        Freewrite the remainder of your newsletter / Statesman article.

        Then revise and rewrite the entire newsletter / Statesman article. Also revise your outline again, if necessary.

        Then finish close-to-final draft of Paper #3 newsletter / Statesman. Do this using Ch. 43 of The New St. Martin's Handbook ([1st ed., Ch. 40] [2nd ed., Ch. 42]). In the end you should have 2 - 5 pages of well-written text.

    • (P#4) Select a topic for an analytic speech for Project #4.

    Week 06
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (11) Tues.

    19 Jan.

    1999


    WORDS FOR DAY (11): COORDINATE AND SUBORDINATE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. Re (R11B) Videotape: "Arranged Marriages" (Ten-minute excerpt from N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman. NY: Public Broadcasting Corporation, 1980. VC 182) [Why is "Arranged Marriages" in quotation marks and N!ai, the Story of a !Kung Woman in italics?]
    3. Evaluation of Readings R01-R10
    4. Practice coordination/subordinating using The New St. Martin's Handbook, Ch. 20, "Creating Coordinate and Subordinate Structures" ([1st ed., Ch. 18] [2nd ed., Ch. 20]).
    5. In-class touch-up of newsletter / Statesman.
    6. Discussion and in-class work on developing and/or restricting topic for "Coffee and Conversation" talk (P#4)
    7. Discussion of outlining (planning), data gathering, sorting and interpreting with emphasis on developing the preliminary outline and taking notes for project #4, an analytic speech.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web11) Read "FAQ: Punctuation Online," p. 350, then check out Grammar and Style Notes by Jack Lynch, and Punctuation by Mary McCaskil.

        Then check out the Punctuation WebSite from St. Martin's


    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R11A) Leslie Marmon Silko, "Yellow Woman," pp. 419-429 (narr)
      2. (R11B) Marjorie Shostak, "Nisa's Marriage," pp. 431-437, from Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman (int, proc an)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H11) Ch. 21, "Creating and Maintaining Parallel Structures" ([1st ed., Ch. 19])

    • WRITING:

        (WR11A) Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 437 Prepare for in-class writing next session
      1. (WR12B) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #2, p. 444

      2. (P#4) Finish newsletter / Statesman article to hand in next class session

        • Select one segment of text (like a paragraph, group of sentences . . .) and bracket it in red. Attach a brief (ca. 50-100 word) discussion explaining why you think it is well-written for your audience. State what assumptions you make about your audience.
        • What basic suggestions would you have for a rewrite for high school students? Write these suggestions out and hand them in with your paper.

      3. Now write 1 question about writing on a "3 X 5" card, or 3" X 5"something. Bring that question to class.

      4. Look again at the "3 X 5" and 3" X 5" above. What is the difference between the two?

      5. Think about selecting a topic for your argumentative proposal / essay for Paper #5. Start your library work for Paper #5 as soon as possible. Order whatever MINITEX materials you may need.

      6. Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. No late writing assignments will be accepted unless you make arrangements in advance. Review "HANDING IN MATERIALS."

    (12) Thurs.

    21 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (12): KETCHUP

    NOTE: Class will meet in H 470.


    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Due today or tomorrow: newsletter / Statesman article (P#3). Should you think you need to do further work, you may turn in the paper before 4:00 tomorrow afternoon.
    2. In-class writing on assigned readings for Day 11. Write on "Explorations," #1, p. 437.
    3. Review of assigned readings. What distinguishes and constitutes professional social science writing?
    4. Review of 3 X 5 questions on writing
    5. Review of other common writing problems. "What makes writing difficult?"
    6. In-class touch up of newsletter / Statesman article.
    7. Video of a talk given at UMD by Michael Dorris, Saving Grace: The Waste and Destruction of Fetal Alcohol Syndrom (VC 1716), which discusses his and Louise Erdrich's son "Adam." How does Dorris organize his talk? What kind of information does he use to support his argument? What is his argument?

      Case Study: Wisconsin vs. Zimmerman

      In August 1996, the State of Wisconsin charged Deborah J. Zimmerman, a 35-year-old waitress from Racine, with attempted first degree murder for inducing Fetal Alcohol Syndrom (FAS) to her child. Her baby girl was born with a blood alcohol level of 0.199, nearly twice the threshold for legal intoxication in Wisconsin, and the baby appears to have FAS. Ms. Zimmerman herself had a blood alcohol level more than three times the threshold when she delivered the baby. According to a report in the Duluth News-Tribune (19 August 1996, pp. 1A, 6A) before the baby was born, insisting that she did not want to give birth, ". . . she told a surgical aide, I'm just going to go home and keep drinking and drink myself to death, and I'm going to kill this thing because I don't want it anyways." How would you vote in the Wisconsin vs. Zimmerman case? How might Dorris' talk or the writings below affect your reaction to the murder trial which may be getting underway this quarter in our neighboring state? Why?


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web12) Put your best piece of writing on your WebSite

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R12A) Kikos Kazantzakis, "The Isle of Aphrodite [Cyprus]," pp. 438-444 (analogy)
      2. (R12B) Simone de Beauvoir, "Woman as Other," pp. 445-452 (argum/pers, c/effect, eg/ill)
      3. (R12C) Handout: Hairston, M. C., "What Business People Think about Grammar and Usage"

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H12A) Ch. 48 "Understanding Disciplinary Discourse" ([1st ed., Ch. 42] [2nd ed., Ch. 45] [3rd ed., Ch. 46])
      2. (optional) Ch. 49 "Writing about Literature" [3rd ed., Ch. 48] (If you are interested in literature and writing about literature have a look at this chapter.)

    • WRITING:

      1. Following Lanham's "Paramedic Method" do an analysis of at least the first three pages of de Beauvoir's "Woman as Other" (R12B) Prepare suggestions for revising de Beauvoir's essay. You will receive a separate copy of this to work on.
      2. (WR12A) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 443
      3. (WR12B) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #2, p. 444

      4. (P#4) Work on taking notes from five or more sources, and then integrate this material into your writing. "Sources" can include notes on things like discussion of the topic with your professors and/or friends, write-ups from displays in art galleries and museums, notes from television programs like Nova and 60 Minutes, notes from programs on Public Radio. . . . Freewrite for Paper #4, your "Coffee and Conversation" talk, incorporating some of these materials. Freewrite at least two double-spaced pages. Bring this to the next class.

      • Write your main idea in one sentence

    UMD DOES NOT PERMIT CANCELLATION OF COURSES AFTER THE END OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF CLASS.
    Week 07
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (13) Tues.

    26 Jan.

    1999


    WORDS FOR DAY (13): SPEECH

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. Schedules permitting, in-class discussion with the author of a book on the works of Simone de Beauvoir.
    3. In-class writing on Simone de Beauvoir's, "Woman as Other." Write on the following: "De Beauvoir's essay can be improved by . . . ." Include some of the results of the parametric exercise in your essay.
    4. Discussion of Hairston, M. C., "What Business People Think about Grammar and Usage" (handout)
    5. Discussion of writing assignment for proposal / essay, Paper #5: Argumentative proposal or essay written to, for example, a county or local board, or to a club or other voluntary association, or to a funding agency.
    6. Peer review and discussion of Paper #4. Generate a list of what makes for an effective analysis. Generate a list of what makes for a good speech. In-class revising of speech.

      Paper #5, the Argumentative proposal / essay, should be a brief written analysis that argues to an audience aware of the problem, but unaware of its complexities. Focus in on the issues crucial to the solution you wish to advocate. Your goal is to build an understanding of the problem full enough that the audience (the county or local board, or whomever. . . ) can consider solutions intelligently. One of the solutions proposed can be to further study the problem--if the proposed study is well thought out and properly presented. The audience should be a group of persons who can do something about the problem. You are only one of several presenters, each arguing for a different solution. You must include examples built from observation, interview, background research, and local statistics. Length: 4-10 well-written double-spaced pages; minimum length = 4 pages.

      Choose an issue that has some larger scope, but that is local to Duluth or to a region you come from or have lived in long enough to understand well. Or choose an issue that is pertinent to your major or your chosen career field. Avoid topics that will generate more heat than new light (e.g., abortion, gun control, religious disputes, pornography, party politics. . .). Whatever topic you choose, you must explore its local or regional relevance. What impact does it have on northern Minnesota and/or Wisconsin?

      You may use a problem on which you are working for another class (with that instructor's permission), or select your own problem, or use one of the following:

      • write an Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) proposal (worth up to ca. $1,000.)
      • a solution to the American Indian treaty-based fiscing rights disputes in Wisconsin or Minnesota
      • Duluth Children's Museum funding, or NE Minnesota Historical Center funding, or Minnesota Public Radio funding, or funding for public fine art, or funding to send a UMD student athlete to the next Olympics
      • National Park restrictions on use of wilderness areas
      • nuclear waste disposal in Minnesota or Wisconsin
      • spouse/child abuse and the need for regional shelters
      • UMD's need for a men's drop-in center
      • need to change UMD's liberal education requirements
      • argue for a laptop computer policy for UMD, or another type of computer policy

      In class we will work on writing and revising Paper #5, but preliminary work must be done before that.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (W13A) Read "FAQ: Mechanics Online," pp. 404-405 of the Handbook, then look again at Grammar and Style Notes by Jack Lynch, and check out Capitalization by Mary McCaskil.

        Then check out the Mechanics WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R13A) Naila Minai, "Women in Early Islam," pp. 470-479 (comp/contr, expo)
      2. (R13B) Handout: Oldenburg and Brissett, "The Essential Hangout" (an, argum/pers)
      3. (R13C) Handout: Oldenburg and Brissett, "The Third Place" (an, argum/pers)
        Note the handling of this material (R13B/C) for different audiences.

      4. Prepare a preliminary bibliography of at 3-5 sources which you expect to use for your (argumentative) proposal / essay ( P#5). Continue to look for additional sources for your proposal / essay (project #5). Read as much as you can about your problem for Paper #5, making note cards and bibliography cards. At the minimum, read at least one of the items from the bibliography and prepare note cards on that source for your own use. Identify the main argument of the author(s). List the types of support the authors use to support their main claim. Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the major premise. Follow The New St. Martin's Handbook, Chs. 41 and 42. ([1st ed., Chs. 38, 39] [2nd ed., Chs. 40, 41])

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H13A) Ch. 50, "Making Oral Presentations" ([1st ed., NA] [2nd ed., NA] [3rd ed., Ch. 53]) (See also handout materials from Hariston.)

    • WRITING:

      1. Complete note cards for both the Oldenburg and Brissette essays (R13B/C). State the problem being made known. Make a list of ways in which the writers explain and demonstrate that the problem exists. Bring the cards to class with you.

      2. Bring, in addition, two questions on the Brissett-Oldenburg articles to the next class period: (1) one question on writing and writing techniques, and (2) one question on substance.

      3. Make a revised/edited outline for Paper #4. See The New St. New Martin's Handbook, Sections 3e., 4e., 43b. ([1st ed., Sections 2i, 3e, 40b] [2nd ed., Sections 3e., 4e., 42b])

      4. Indicate your audience at the top of the outline. See The New St. New Martin's Handbook, Section 2h. ([1st ed., Section 2d] [2nd ed., Section 2e])

      5. Work on rough draft of "Coffee and Conversation" presentation (P#4).

      6. Begin Paper #5 "prewriting" and "freewriting" (cf., Day 16). This time around, number the paragraphs when you do your "freewriting" (¶ = paragraph):

        • ¶ #1 Exactly what is the problem? Write one paragraph defining the problem.

        • ¶ #2 Who does the problem affect? Write one paragraph describing who the problem affects.

        • ¶ #3 Why does the problem need a solution now? Why can't it wait? Write one paragraph explaining why the problem must be addressed now.

        • ¶ #4 Exactly what has to be done now? Write one paragraph indicating the apparent solution.

        • ¶ #5 Who can do something about the problem? Who grants money? Who provides other resources? What do they need to know? Specifically who is the person who, or what is the committee or organization which, you think can help solve the problem? Make a note of that. [This is just another audience definition problem.]

    • OTHER ASSIGNMENTS:

      1. Have you ordered your MINITEX or other interlibrary loan materials yet for your argumentative proposal / essay (P#5)? Why not?

    (14) Thurs.

    28 Jan.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (14): DISCUSSION

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Discussion of "The Essential Hangout" and "The Third Place"
    2. Hand in cards for R13B/C, if you didn't already do so
    3. Final exam practice session: IV. Writing mechanics and Processes


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web14) Work on your WebPage to get the following the way you want them:

        • background
        • font colors/styles
        • images
        • midi
        • HomePage messages
        • points to other things
        • Your Writings page

        If you need help, stop by, or see Annabella

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R14A) Unni Wikan, "The Xanith: A Third Gender Role?" pp. 488-502 (def)
      2. (R14B) David Abram, "Making Magic," pp. 513-522 (iron)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H14A) Ch. 22, "Varying Sentence Structures" ([1st ed., Ch. 20])
      2. (H14B) Ch. 23, "Creating Memorable Prose" ([1st ed., Ch. 21])

    • WRITING:

      1. Revise/edit Paper #4. Complete next-to-final draft of this, and get it ready to hand in.

        • Delete what is repetitive or verbiage from the earlier draft.
        • Add examples, statistics, comparisons to illustrate your point.
        • Get some urgency into your paper.

      2. Write a press release for your "Coffee and Conversation" piece. Include information on when (including day and time) and where (including address and room numbers) it will be held, who to contact for further information, intended audience (is "everyone welcome," for example?), cost, and sponsoring agency (if any). Do this on a separate sheet.
      3. In one sentence at the top of page one write what you think is your main problem with this paper.
      4. Incubate on Paper #5, your proposal / essay. That is, the assignment is to do no work on Paper #5. (This assumes that you have already done everything suggested up until this point.) Quite frequently one of the best things you can do when writing is put the project aside for a day or two, or longer. In fact, sometimes doing nothing is the very best thing you can do. The sequence should go (1) preparation, (2) incubation, and (3) inspiration. So, incubate. When you incubate, just be careful that you don't expirate.

    Week 08
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (15) Tues.

    02 Feb.

    1999


    WORDS FOR DAY (15): CONVERSE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. From The New St. Martin's Handbook do exercise 22.1 on pp. 270-271, exercise 22.3 on p. 276, exercises 23.1 and 23.2 on p. 281
    3. In-class revising of "Coffee and Conversation" talk (P#4)

      • Check "big" items: outline, logic . . .
      • Check "midrange" items: paragraphs, transitions . . .
      • Check "small" items: wordiness, mechanics, spelling . . .

      • Review: The New St. Martin's Handbook:
        • §4c (on getting responses to drafts) ([1st ed., §3c])
        • §4d (on evaluating the thesis and its support) ([1st ed., §3d])
        • §4e (on analyzing organization) ([1st ed., §3e])
        • §4f (on reconsidering the title, introduction, and conclusion) ([1st ed., §3f])
        • §4g.1 (on examining paragraphs) ([1st ed., §3g.1])
        • §4g.2 (on examining sentences) ([1st ed., §3g.2])
        • §4g.3 (on examining words) ([1st ed., §3g.3])
        • §4g.4 (on examining tone) ([1st ed., §3g.4]])
        • §4j (on proofreading the final draft) ([1st ed., §3i])

    4. Discussion of and in-class work on developing (argumentative) proposal / essay (P#5). Review freewriting paragraphs from Day 13. Work on paragraph #1, "What is the problem?," and paragraph #2, "Who does the problem affect?"


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web15) Read "FAQ: Research Online," pp. 430-431 of the Handbook, then check

        Then check out the Research WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R15A) Joseph Bruchac, "Digging into Your Heart," pp. 523-530 (argum/pers)
      2. (R15B) Eudora Welty, "Fairy Tale of the Natchez Trace," pp. 531-543 (c/effect, proc an)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H15A) Ch. 27, "Considering Diction" ([1st ed., Ch. 25])
      2. (H15B) Ch. 28, "Considering Language Variety"
      3. (H15C) Ch. 29, "Considering Others: Building Common Ground"

    • WRITING:

      1. Finish Paper #4 to hand in next time.

        • Indicate audience and thesis statement at the top of the first page.
        • In one sentence at the top of page one write what you think is the best feature of your article. In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with your article.
        • What makes your writing effective? Make a list. Attach that list to the end of your paper

      2. Write a press release for your "Coffee and Conversation" presentation (P#4). Include this with your paper.

      3. Continue research, reading, note taking, and freewriting for proposal / essay (P#5).

        • Read something pertaining to your topic and add two sentences or a paragraph relating to what you have read. Identify this addition on your drafts. Identify this by writing on your drafts something like, "this is the new material that I added for Day 15." At a minimum, read one new source for your proposal / essay project (Paper #5).
        • Make bibliography cards and note cards for your own use.

      4. Work on the paragraphs defining your problem for project #5. You should already have finished your freewriting (cf., Day 13).

        • Answer the question, "Exactly what is the problem?" (¶ #1)
        • Work on the paragraph explaining who the problem affects. (¶ #2)
        • Write one paragraph explaining why the problem needs a solution now. Why can't it wait? (¶ #3)
        • Write a list of solutions/resolutions that are possible for your problem. List as best you can the reasons for and the objections to each. Use two columns. List pros in one column, cons in the other. (¶ #4)
        • Work on the paragraph outlining who can do something about the problem? (¶ #5)

    • (WR15A) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #1, p. 530
    • (WR15B) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #1, p. 543

    • Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. No late writing assignments will be accepted unless you make arrangements in advance. Review "HANDING IN MATERIALS."

    (16) Thurs.

    04 Feb.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (16): WOMAN

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Hand in Paper #4 today or tomorrow. Hand in all materials, including drafts. See "HANDING IN MATERIALS." When you get your paper back keep track of revisions and suggestions for revision to help you improve your writing.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web16) Critique (to them) the WebPages of
        the other two people in your lab group.

        (Lab groups are listed at the bottom of the W99 Class WebPage page.)

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R16A) Gabriel García Márquez, "Dreams for Hire," pp. 567-574 (iron, narr)
      2. (R16B) Gino Del Guercio, "The Secrets of Haiti's Living Dead," pp. 587-596 (expo)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H16) Pick one of the following documenting styles and follow it:

      • Ch. 44, "Documenting Sources: MLA Style"
      • Ch. 45, "Documenting Sources: APA Style"
      • Ch. 46, "Documenting Sources: CBE Style"
      • Ch. 47, "Documenting Sources: Chicago Style"
        ([1st ed., Ch. 41] [2nd ed., Chs. 43-44] [3rd ed., Chs. 44-45])

    • WRITING:

      1. Work at revising proposal / essay (Paper #5). Write a draft full enough that you can also begin work on your resolution. You will need to have definitions clear, a division of the whole into parts, and adequate set of reasons. Know your audience.
      2. Classify in writing your possible resolutions. Select those that seem best for your audience. Are there resolutions your audience might be more comfortable with than the one you intend to offer?
      3. Write a paragraph expanding on your proposed solution. List the 3-5 major ideas, examples, claims, and other illustrative materials that support your argument. Be prepared to discuss your revisions with your peer reviewers.
      4. Include in your revision two opposing positions or pieces of evidence that can be used against your argument. Have these written out and ready to use in class.

      5. (W16A) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #2, p. 574
      6. (W16B) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 595


    Week 09
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (17) Tues.

    09 Feb.

    1999


    WORDS FOR DAY (17): MAN

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. Discussion of Documenting Sources: APA, MLA, CBE, and Chicago Styles
    3. Toulman System exercise for developing an argument (cf., The New St. Martin's Handbook, p. 92), including exercise 5.6 from The New St. Martin's Workbook. How does this compare with the way Michael Dorris organized his UMD talk?
    4. In-class revising/developing of Paper #5, (argumentative) proposal / essay. Rewrite and revise freewriting paragraphs from Day 13. Why does the problem need a solution now? Why can't it wait? Exactly what has to be done now? Who can do something about the problem? Who grants money? Who provides other resources? What do they need to know? Specifically who is the person who, or what, is the committee or organization which, you think can help solve the problem?
    5. Group work on arguments


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web17) Read "FAQ: Academic Writing Online," pp. 620-621 of the Handbook, then check these online

        Then check out the Academic Disciplines WebSite from St. Martin's, including

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R17A) Chinua Achebe, "The Song of Ourselves," pp. 599-605 (argum/pers) Optional: Videotape, Chinua Achebe, UMD # VC 1571
      2. (R17B) Wole Soyinka, "Nigerian Childhood," pp. 606-614 (descr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H17A) Ch. 5, "Thinking Critically: Constructing and Analyzing Arguments" ([1st ed., Ch. 4])
      2. (H17B) Page through the remainder of Part 2 of The New St. Martin's Handbook, "Sentences: Making Grammatical Choices," Chs. 7-12 ([1st ed., Chs. 6-10])

        • Ch. 7, "Constructing Grammatical Sentences" (Review)
        • Ch. 8, "Understanding Pronoun Case"
        • Ch. 9, "Using Verbs" (Review)
        • Ch. 10, "Maintaining Subject-Verb Agreement"
        • Ch. 11, "Maintaining Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement"
        • Ch. 12, "Using Adjectives and Adverbs"

    • WRITING:

      1. Develop and revise/edit your proposal / essay (P#5).
      2. Write out your main argument in one sentence. Make a list of the 3-5 major ideas, examples, statistics, and claims that support your argument(s).
      3. Also write a 100-150 word abstract for your proposal / essay (cf. handout)

      4. (H16) Pick one of the following documenting styles and follow it:

      • Ch. 44, "Documenting Sources: MLA Style"
      • Ch. 45, "Documenting Sources: APA Style"
      • Ch. 46, "Documenting Sources: CBE Style"
      • Ch. 47, "Documenting Sources: Chicago Style"
        ([1st ed., Ch. 41] [2nd ed., Chs. 43-44] [3rd ed., Chs. 44-45])

    (18) Thurs.

    11 Feb.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (18): LAWYER

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Review of assigned readings
    2. Revising: "American Indians: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow" (practice exercise for the final exam)
    3. Discussion of abstracts, and abstract for proposal / essay (P#5): Handout: Hairston, M. C., "Abstracts"
    4. Read the proposal / essay of someone else. Have them read yours. If you were a person making the decision on the proposal / essay topic, what else would you like to know about the problem? Would you give the money asked for, or provide the other resources requested? If not, why not? If you would, what specifically most convinced you? If you wouldn't, what would it take to convince you to grant the request?
    5. In-class revising of proposal / essay (P#5). Work on revising sentences; check wordiness and overuse of "to be" verbs. Discuss your works, examining the quality of their arguments and the quality of the evidence used as support for the position(s) taken. Check thesis.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web18) Check the library resources available at Useful WebSites: http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/tr/truseful.html#L

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R18A) Grace Paley, "Six Days: Some Rememberings," pp. 655-661 (narr)
      2. (R18B) Cornel West, "Race Matters," pp. 662-669 (argum/pers, expo)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H18) Page through the remainder of Part 3 of The New St. Martin's Handbook, "Sentences: Making Conventional Choices," Chs. 13-18 ([1st ed., Chs. 11-16]):

        • Ch. 13, "Maintaining Clear Pronoun Reference"
        • Ch. 14, "Recognizing Shifts"
        • Ch. 15, "Identifying Comma Splices and Fused Sentences"
        • Ch. 16, "Recognizing Sentence Fragments"
        • Ch. 17, "Placing Modifiers Appropriately"
        • Ch. 18, "Maintaining Consistent and Complete Grammatical Structures"

    • WRITING:

      1. Prepare a simple list of what makes your argument(s) effective. Attach that list to the end of your paper.
      2. Finish "rough draft" of proposal / essay (Paper #5)

      3. (WR18A) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #2, p. 660

    Week 10
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (19) Tues.

    16 Feb.

    1999


    WORDS FOR DAY (19): ANGST

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Very brief review of assigned readings
    2. Responses to questions on The St. Martin's Handbook
    3. Discussion of final exam
    4. Practice exercise(s) for final exam
    5. Peer review and discussion of proposal / essay (P#5). Check thesis, evidence, style and punctuation. In one sentence at the top of page one, describe the best feature of your paper and article. ("That they are done," is not enough.) In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with them. Check thesis, sources, audience, logic, mechanics, spelling and style. In-class revising.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web19A) Read "FAQ: Considering Media Online," p. 644 of the Handbook, then check these online:
      2. (Web19B) Then check out the ACA Rhetoric and Public Address Library WebSite from St. Martin's

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R19A) Neil Postman, "Future Shlock," pp. 670-679 (eg/ill)
      2. (R19B) Nelson Mandela, "Black Man in a White Court," pp. 688-697 (argum/pers)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H19A) Page through the remainder of Part 5 of The New St. Martin's Handbook, "Selecting Effective Words," Chs. 24-26 ([1st ed., Chs. 22-26]

        • Ch. 24, "Attending to Spelling"
        • Ch. 25, "Using Dictionaries"
        • Ch. 26, "Enriching Vocabulary"

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR19A) Think about Verburg, "Elaborations," #1, p. 679

      2. Revise/edit proposal / essay (P#5), incorporating the suggestions received in class. Prepare papers to hand in, as before. In addition:
        • Include in your revision two opposing positions or pieces of evidence that can be used against your argument(s).
        • In one sentence at the top of page one, write what you think are the best features of your paper and article. In another sentence write what you think is the main problem with these papers. Do you agree or disagree with the person who reviewed your paper?
        • Explain in writing why paper five is well written for the audience. Select a passage that illustrates how well written it is and discuss it. Length: 100-200 words.

      3. Prepare all writing assignments to hand in next class period. No late writing assignments will be accepted unless you make arrangements in advance. Review "HANDING IN MATERIALS."

    (20) Thurs.

    18 Feb.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (20): THE END

    Final Exam will be held today.
    Course evaluations will be given on Tuesday, 16 February.
    Other due dates remain the same.


    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. Course evaluation
    2. Due today or tomorrow: Paper #5 IN FINAL FORM TO HAND IN
    3. Due: Extra Credit writing critique of one chapter of When Everybody Called Me Forever-Flying-Bird, 3-5 pages.
    4. Brief review of assigned readings
    5. Evaluation of Readings R11-R19
    6. Review of writing problems: What makes writing hard? Cf., Day 01.
    7. Review of writing solutions: What helps it get easier? Cf., Day 01.
    8. Write a 20 minute critique of another student's paper. Put your name, the other student's name and the title of the essay on the first page of your critique. Give this critique to the author of the paper. Include the other student's critique of your proposal / essay (P#5) with your materials when you hand them in.
    9. Practice exercise(s) for final exam (time permitting)


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web20) Read "FAQ: Multilingual Writers Online," p. 684 of the Handbook, then check the For Multilingual Writers WebSite from St. Martin's, and

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R20A) Aung San Suu Kyi, "Freedom from Fear," pp. 698-704 (argum/pers)
      2. (R20B) Fay Weldon, "Down the Clinical Disco," pp. 705-712 (iron, narr)

    • ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H20) If you have not already done so, page through the remainder of The New St. Martin's Handbook: Part 6, "Understanding Punctuation Conventions," Chs. 30-35 ([1st ed., Chs. 27-32] [2nd ed., Chs. 29-34])

        • Ch. 30, "Using Commas"
        • Ch. 31, "Using Semicolons"
        • Ch. 32, "Using End Punctuation"
        • Ch. 33, "Using Apostrophes"
        • Ch. 34, "Using Quotation Marks"
        • Ch. 35, "Using Other Punctuation Marks"

        Part 7, "Understanding Mechanical Conventions," Chs. 36-39 ([1st ed., Chs. 33-36] [2nd ed., Chs. 35-38])

        • Ch. 36, "Using Capitals"
        • Ch. 37, "Using Abbreviations and Numbers"
        • Ch. 38, "Using Italics"
        • Ch. 39, "Using hyphens"

  • WRITING:

    1. (WR18A) Think about Verburg, "Explorations," #1, p. 703

  • Week 11
    Week: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | Home |
    Day: | 01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 | 08 | 09 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | Final Exam |
    (21) Wed.

    24 Feb.

    1999

    16:00 -
    17:55

    Cina 214


    Welcome Course Summary Syllabus Class Schedule Summary of Assignments COMPforum (Discussion Board) Exams
    Envelope: E-mail
    Home: TR
    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    PCForum search links page

    | WWW Reference Works | Map of Africa | Other Maps

    WORDS FOR DAY (21): FINAL

    Final Exam will be on Thursday, 18 February,
    \ 4:00-5:50 in Cina 214.
    Course evaluations will be given on Tuesday, 16 February.
    Other due dates remain the same.


    Need Help?


    TOPIC OF THE DAY:

    Final Exam

    • The final exam will be open-book. You may bring your texts, class notes, a dictionary, a thesaurus, the memos I have written to you, and any personal notes.

    • The exam will include five parts (about 20% of your grade, or 40 of a possible ca. 200 points; 4%, or 8 points for each of five parts, plus 4 points for the vocabulary extra credit option):

      1. questions on the Verburg readings, from the "Explorations" sections of the readings

      2. questions on the Verburg readings, from the "Connections" sections of the readings

      3. writing exercise, including some from the "Elaborations" sections of the Verburg readings

      4. a section on the writing process from the The New St. Martin's Handbook (including grammar and mechanics, and how to do bibliographical citations in APA or MLA or CBE or Chicago-style formats)

      5. a revising exercise (similar to what we will work on in class)

      6. for up to 4 points extra credit: a question on vocabulary (cf., "Word of the Day" entries which follow, such as the one for "interview" on Day 06).

    • Makeup Exam Note: If you cannot take the final exam at the designated time, prior to finals week please arrange for a makeup exam.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web21)Check out Writing Labs, etc. On-Line: http://www.d.umn.edu/cla/faculty/troufs/writing.html

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R21A) David Grossman, "Israeli Arb, Israeli Jew," pp. 713-729 (comp/contr)
      2. (R21B) Anchee Min, "The Fall of Autumn Leaves," pp. 733-742 (narr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H21) Review Chs. 1-56 ([1st ed., Chs. 1-46] [2nd ed., Chs. 1-49] [3rd ed., Chs. 1-54])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR21A) Hanks, Tom, "[Write] well the part, for therein lies the glory"

      2. (P#6) Using your writing skills, help make the world a better place for the young ones who follow

    (22) Fri.

    26 Feb.

    1999


    WORD FOR DAY (22): GOOD-BYE

    TOPICS OF THE DAY:

    1. No later than Friday, 26 February 1999, pick up final papers and final exam at Cina 215.


    ASSIGNMENTS:

    • WORLDWIDE WEB:

      1. (Web22) Surf happily off into the setting sun.

    • ESSAY READING:

      1. (R22A) Fang Lizhi, "Thoughts on Reform," pp. 743-754 (argum/pers)
      2. (R22B) Jianying Zha, "Yearnings," pp. 769-781 (descr)

    • THE NEW ST. MARTIN'S HANDBOOK:

      1. (H22) Review Chs. 1-56 over, and over again. . . . ([1st ed., Chs. 1-46] [2nd ed., Chs. 1-49] [3rd ed., Chs. 1-54])

    • WRITING:

      1. (WR21A) Write well, as needed, appropriate for the purpose and audience

      2. (P#6) Revise / edit (P#6) from Day 21

    Footnote to the Quarter

    "Whether you realize it or not right now, the way you write can make a real difference in the life you lead after you have completed freshman English [and Composition 3160]. . . . What writing ability finally gives you, then, is the power to express yourself on paper for any purpose you choose. . . . Very few things that college can give you will be more important to you afterward than the ability to put your thoughts and feelings into words."

    (James A. W. Heffernan and John E. Lincoln, Writing: A College Handbook, 2nd ed., NY: W. W. Norton, 1986, p. 662).

    Have a good break.

    -- Tim Roufs


    Envelope: E-mail © 1998 - 2014 Timothy G. Roufs
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